The Picture of Dorian Gray


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Oscar, Oscar, Oscar, Forever is a long time... I get bored at cocktail parties!--Submitted by Tequila Mockingbird.


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Oscar Wilde's perfectly charming and witty manner of expression will enchant you in more ways than one. He is a master storyteller and drifts through the story like a gentle summer breeze through odour filled roses, giving you the feeling that you can literally smell the flower he is describing. The Picture of Dorian Gray is a masterpiece. A beautiful story, based in a beautiful era. The story focuses on an extremely handsome young man, who at the beginning is naively not aware of the power this brings. Through his friend Basil, the artist who is to blame for the exquisite portrait of Dorian, he meets Lord Henry, the fun loving, dangerously influential gentleman who takes a liking to Dorian and makes him a sort of protégé of his. It is Lord Henry that takes Dorian's innocence and teaches him the way of the world, or British society, and sparks the light of vanity and pride in Dorian. This magical story enters into the fragile world of youth and old age, the thirst to maintain the former and the fear of the inevitable latter, accompanied with dreadful emotions of love, shame, hate, fear...I can't imagine why no one has made a movie of it yet. This is one book that will stand on your shelf with pride, and will be the most worn and torn one there. Enjoy the genius of Wilde.--Submitted by Ivana Magdenoska.

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There is an old film version of this story called "The Portrait of Dorian Grey" which was possibly made in the late 1930's to early 1940's. The actor who played the main character, Dorian Gray, was most exquisite of form and played the character most effectively. Actor George Sands was the Lord who corrupted the young Dorian, and I believe it was for the sheer pleasure of corruption of youth that he undertook that task. This story is more about choices, personal volition, and responsibility. We can look at Dorian and question his making that choice, but the person who set him upon that path bears the greater responsibility for corruption of an innocent person. In the end, Dorian is done-in by his own desire to destroy what he had himself created of his life, and what he had destroyed of the person of his own making. Chilling and undeniably timely as the society we make for ourselves today seeks to destroy itself by corrupting the youth that we deem iconic. --Submitted by Anonymous

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What would you do if you had a record of every bad deed you did? Would you hide it away where no one would see it? What would you do to hide your secret if someone discovered it? Read this book and ponder these age old questions.--Submitted by Sandra Branum

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Recent Forum Posts on The Picture of Dorian Gray

Review and Analysis Gangster style

Maybe the funniest treatment of the book, ever. Enjoy! http://thug-notes.com/


Lord Henry's speech:goals and means.

Lord Henry's aims (goals) I shall not judge. "To be beautiful and young above all." It's his actual speech that is brilliant. I find his proposition in chapter 2: "Youth! Youth! Youth! There is nothing in the world but youth." He backs up his argument with that same paragraph in chapter 2 directed to Dorian and with two different paragraphs in chapter 1 directed to Basil. Chapter 2 Henry to Dorian: "Be young! It doesn't lasts long and is worth having. When youth go beauty goes and beauty is worth having because"... and he gives two reasons. Chapter 1 Henry to Basil: Paragraph 1: Beauty vs ugly Beauty vs intelligence Beauty = stupid = good (moral and estheatics are equalled...to be beautifu is a good thing a moral thing.) Paragraph 2: adds the time factor. This beauty which is so good doesn't last because we all try to be intelligent and well informed and therefore become ugly. Basically he ties beauty to a moral value. If to be beautiful is a moral thing wouldn't you do anything in the world (means) to achieve that goal? All his actions are justified for a higher goal, to be happy. Beauty brings happiness. I feel like if oscar wilde could have sta down one day and said, "Beauty, for or against. Discuss." You try it...try being a lawyer that has to defend that position in a debate....fascinating the way Oscar does it...whether you lik his goals or not...that is none of my business. About his goals....everyone is free to decide what values will make him or her happy. One can only debate the means used to achieve his goals. And his writing style, which in my opinion is timeless and perfection.


Original Picture of Dorian Grey

My friend and I have been trying to locate the original Picture of Dorian Grey by Oscar Wilde, but to no avail. A simple Google search for that topic doesn't seem to provide much, and it's hard to go on hearsay from Google anyway. Does anyone know what I could search for? Or better yet, do you know where I could find a copy or download? Assistance is very much appreciated. Thank you. :)


Questions about the Picture of Dorian Gray

What was the book that Lord Henry gave to Dorian Gray that fascinated dorian so much? What is the book about? Why was dorian so afraid that people view his painting? How did Dorian meet Sybil Vane?


Explanation of an epigram from "Portrait of Dorian Gray"

For those of you familiar with this novel, I'm inquiring the meaning of Lord Henry Wotton's "The world goes to the altar of its own accord" in chapter 18. Thanks. *I meant "Picture of Dorian Gray" in the title*


Oscar Wilde

Hi,everyone! I just want to know your opinion!) Is The Picture of Dorian Gray a moral or immoral book? Thank you=)


film

Hey, has anyone seen the film Dorian Gray? Is it any good?:goof:


the book from Lord Henry

Does anyone know what the book is Lord Henry sends Dorian when he has decided to put the portrait upstairs in the schoolroom? It is about a youth in Paris and about the corruption of the youth. A kind of psychoanalytical thing. Dorian gets fascinated by it and has several copies made in several colours so that it will suit his changing moods and tastes. But does anyone know what book Wilde had in mind? It could be interesting to understand The Picture better... Thanks! k


Dorian Grey&Why Devil didn't play his key role?

I just posted my first blog here.I can't say it is a Review of the book,i call it Abstract and i wrote a few already on my favorite masterpieces. My review is named *Dorian Grey&A Conversation with Oscar Wilde* I don't know if you asked yourself why Mr.Wilde didn't give the Devil an active role in his novele-i think Devil was not present as a character who take part in events. Goethe and Mikhail Bulgakov gave Devil a key role to act from the very beginning of their works. i would like to know your thinking on this theme. To read my abstract,please visit my blog here. If i posted this on wrong place,then a thread could be :What is your thinking about Abstracts? How do you like my writing and what do you think about such method of expression?


Essay Help!!

Hi, Im writing an essay for my english class and I was wondering if someone could help me out on the following topics... 1. Comment on Lord Henry and Dorian as "artists of their own lives." 2. Discuss in depth the "terrible moral" in Dorian Gray. 3. Explain how and why Dorian has "sold his soul to the devil." If anyone can help and send me feedback on these topics it would be great and I would really appreciate it


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