Under the Greenwood Tree


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or; The Mellstock Quire



A rural painting of the Dutch school.



First published anonymously in 1872.



Thomas Hardy's novels are exceptionally descriptive of nature and emotional feelings of each individual characters and the reflections of life. Under the greenwood tree is indeed a novel so immensely written to picturise the 18th century society and the closeness of the social fabric during that time. It is a superb presentation of various seasons. The feminine character of Miss Fancy and the true love and emotions with Dick Duwey is a classical presentation of the life style and the real world feelings interestingly woven as a love plot with unassumed gesture. I read this novel as a student at the age of 18, and after 42 years, I had the opportunity to read it once again. I am extremely delighted as my mind rolled back to those times. I recommend strongly this novel especially to younger generation to learn many things of life.--Submitted by Dr. Adibhatla Santharam


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Thomas Hardy

I watched a T.V. version of Under the Greenwood Tree and the heroine married the handsome young farmer. I do not have the book but I understood that Fancy Day married the wealthy land owner in the end. Can anyone help me with this?:)


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