The Mayor of Casterbridge


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The Life and Death of a Man of Character



(1886)



Set in the fictional town of Casterbridge (based on the town of Dorchester in Dorset), this is one of Hardy's Wessex novels.



Henchard is a strong man brought low by his own faults of character and human failings. The book is a mix of love and conflict, fate and tragedy all contained within Hardy's unique area of Wessex.--Submitted by Anonymous


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Recent Forum Posts on The Mayor of Casterbridge

Problem with the wheat

I met a friend who likes Hardy and who is a professor in agriculture. I asked him whether he liked Hardy because of all the descriptions of farming. He said the problem described with the wheat was the same problem he studied for his PhD. Overall, he said the first few chapters up to the wife-selling episode were good, but that after that, it started to just go on and on.


Hardy is amazing.

To all you people out there that are reading this book for school and finding it terribly boring well I did it in school as well and I read it on my own first of all and absolutely adored it. It had so many twists and turns and I couldn't put it down. Honestly, it is only because you are reading it and methodically going through it and picking out stuff that it is so boring. Read it all on your own and you'll get hooked. :D I'm actually really sad that Hardy is being called boring. He's one of the best and most amazing writers of all time! I love his gloomy endings. I think he's the male, pessimistic version of Jane Austen. :)


Please answer quickly

can anybody explain the social , economic , and political conditions reflected in The Book MAYOR OF CASTER BRIDGE and highlight important developments and problems existing in 19th and 20th century


hardy influencing rowling?

Has any one noticed in Thomas Hardy's Mayor of Casterbridge that the word Dumbledore and Hagrid are used in the same sentence. If any one wishes to check this it's near the beginning of a chapter on page 100 of the penguin edition (in UK). Also just started reading The return of the native and there's another character called Diggory. Now any Harry Potter fan will recognise this as well - coincidence?


Questions about this Book? ASK AWAY!!!

I'll be happy to answer any questions(or most), to the best of my ability, pertaining to this book.


The mayor and redemption

In asking about redemption, I'm not speaking of it in the Biblical sense, but rather, of turnign a new leaf, to be a new person if you will. I read this book in college as part of a great college class that I was in. I remember the discussion of this book vividly as the story obviously deals with a man with a sordid past who has evidently moved on. Can a person truly improve themselves and move on entirely? Or are they to be continually haunted by their past actions? The million dollar question.:D


Important Quotes

What are some of the most important quotes in the book in your opinion? Mostly in regards to character, settting, portrayal of women, the idea of the tragic hero and/or the idea of fate vs. choice. Any ideas?


SELL YOUR LECTURER INSTEAD

Trust me, Hardy was the bravest man who lived - the book was sheer misery to read, let alone write. If, like me, you're being forced to read it for your course, you're better off following the advice above.


MoC

I think this was a great book and it had all the details needed... I also thought it informed me a bit about the time back then.


hardy

hardy's hard novel indeed. I am seeing the nature's influence in the minds of the characters. The lifes of the characters are moving in the direction of natures will. nothing is definite in this ephemeral world. all the hard things in life should be borne by a person in this world. this is highlighted in this novel.


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