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Introduction

THE
SECOND

BOOKE OF THE
FAERIE QVEENE.

Contayning
THE LEGEND OF SIR GVYON.

OR
OF TEMPERAUNCE.

 


R Ight well I wote most mighty Soueraine,
  That all this famous antique history,
   Of some th'aboundance of an idle braine
   Will iudged be, and painted forgery,
   Rather then matter of iust memory,
   Sith none, that breatheth liuing aire, does know,
  Where is that happy land of Faery,
   Which I so much do vaunt, yet no where show,
But vouch antiquities, which no body can know.
But let that man with better sence aduize,
   That of the world least part to vs is red:
   And dayly how through hardy enterprize,
   Many great Regions are discouered,
   Which to late age were neuer mentioned.
   Who euer heard of th'Indian Peru?
   Or who in venturous vessell measured
   The Amazon huge riuer now found trew?
Or fruitfullest Virginia who did euer vew?

Yet all these were, when no man did them know;
   Yet haue from wisest ages hidden beene:
   And later times things more vnknowne shall show.
   Why then should witlesse man so much misweene
   That nothing is, but that which he hath seene?
   What if within the Moones faire shining spheare?
   What if in euery other starre vnseene
   Of other worldes he happily should heare?
He wo[n]der would much more: yet such to some appeare.

Of Faerie lond yet if he more inquire,
   By certaine signes here set in sundry place
   He may it find; ne let him then admire,
   But yield his sence to be too blunt and bace,
   That no'te without an hound fine footing trace.
  And thou, O fairest Princesse vnder sky,
   In this faire mirrhour maist behold thy face,
   And thine owne realmes in lond of Faery,
 And in this antique Image thy great auncestry.

The which O pardon me thus to enfold
   In couert vele, and wrap in shadowes light,
   That feeble eyes your glory may behold,
   Which else could not endure those beames bright,
   But would be dazled with exceeding light.
   O pardon, and vouchsafe with patient eare
   The braue aduentures of this Faery knight
   The good Sir Guyon gratiously to heare,
In whom great rule of Temp'raunce goodly doth appeare.

 

 

Edmund Spenser