Twenty Years After


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(1845)



The year is now 1648, twenty years since the close of the last story. Louis XIII has died, as has Cardinal Richelieu, and while the crown of France may sit upon the head of Anne of Austria as Regent for the young Louis XIV, the real power resides with the Cardinal Mazarin, her secret husband. D'Artagnan is now a lieutenant of musketeers, and his three friends have retired to private life. Athos turned out to be a nobleman, the Comte de la Fere, and has retired to his home with his son, Raoul de Bragelonne. Aramis, whose real name is D'Herblay, has followed his intention of shedding the musketeer's cassock for the priest's robes, and Porthos has married a wealthy woman, who left him her fortune upon her death. But trouble is stirring in both France and England. Cromwell menaces the institution of royalty itself while marching against Charles I, and at home the Fronde is threatening to tear France apart. D'Artagnan brings his friends out of retirement to save the threatened English monarch, but Mordaunt, the son of Milady, who seeks to avenge his mother's death at the musketeers' hands, thwarts their valiant efforts. Undaunted, our heroes return to France just in time to help save the young Louis XIV, quiet the Fronde, and tweak the nose of Cardinal Mazarin.

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The sequel to The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After is slightly slower but is still an interesting read. It does repeat the success-formula of The Three Musketeers and maybe is less compelling, but the characters show more depth and have now really got older. Our hero d’Artagnan has in the meantime moved on to the rank of Lieutenant of the Musketeers, as in those 20 years the division between the Cardinal’s and King’s Musketeers has been abolished. However, d’Artagnan has still got ambitions to become Captain of the Musketeers, like Mr de Tréville, his compatriot. Cardinal Mazarin, a stingy Italian, is now governing France--after the death of cardinal Richelieu--rather than the regent to Louis XIV, his mother queen Anne of Austria who is supposed to have married Mazarin in secret. When Mazarin orders d’Artagnan to go and help Cromwell in his rebellion against Charles I of England, in an attempt to avoid civil war in France, d’Artagnan goes to look for his friends but cannot all persuade them to come with him. They will meet in a very unusual place indeed. In spite of their efforts, King Charles I of England is still killed and our friends will have to return home, in trouble. Nevertheless, the book will end on a positive note again, after an admirable intervention of d’Artagnan. Dumas makes his characters grow in this book and develops the personality they had in The Three Musketeers. All of them have grown older and have moved on in their lives. A good read, nevertheless, certainly because there is another sequel to the sequel: The Vicomte de Bragelonne. --Submitted by kiki1982





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Recent Forum Posts on Twenty Years After

What if...

What if Mordaunt is Athos' son? When I read "Twenty Years After" I couldn't help, but to think so.All his strange behaviour torward him. And it has something to do with the time look: in 1649 years (the date was in the book) athos said that he's 49 years, so in 1548, he was also, unless he was born in new years cuz then it was something like the begining of january. So he was born in 1599. And it's said that athos was 25, when he married milady, so they got marry in 1624. Mordaut was born in 1625 (in 1648 he was 23, unless his bithday is in new years). So....they divorced in summer I believe, cuz it's said that June and july was the worst month for athos , and summer + 9 month (or 8) it equally 1625. Maybe..I'm not good at math..Just wanna some discussion, because I'm borring:smilielol5:


Mordaunt's Hypocrisy

I am nearing the end of the book now, and there was one thing about the character of Mordaunt that consistently bothered me, and which made me want to scream at the book sometimes, because I just found it a rather baffling inconsistency within his character. He was all full of vengeance rage for what became of his mother, and because her crimes robbed him of what should have been his inheritance, and had this murderous loyalty to her in spite of all the crimes which she had committed, and the fact that she brought her own fate down upon herself in the things she had done. Yet, the fact that his mother killed his father has not the least bit of concern to him. The death of his father meant nothing to him, he was willing to just shrug that off without a thought or a care. His mother was executed for committing a series of crimes, including cold blooded murder on more than one occasion, while his father was killed out of the cold-blooded selfish greed of his mother, but he finds the offence of his mother greater than that of the offence against his father.


The four heros...

Does anyone else also think that the characters actually grow in Twenty years Later? Athos: I think he is even more respectable in a way than he was before... His speach to d'Artagnan is so powerful... He's fantastic in his support for Charles I and so worth his title of Count de La Fere... Aramis: He's again so behind-your-back but still so devoted as well to a cause... That first scene he enters the book in is so great with the ladders... And when he comes to save them all in the palaxe of Mazarin with his army. Brings just a smile to my face, that. Porthos: He is sooooooooo adorable! I mean, he is so devoted to the cause, he is so stupid still but has just learned to not to ask any questions anymore because he doesn't understand anyway... When d'Artagnan makes a plan to escape when they are locked up in Mazarin's palace, that's just so great, when he asks 'and if I strangle him?' Just makes me laugh out loud! And still he can bring tears to your eyes when he refuses to leave the boat without his servants because they are so dear to him. He thorw them in the water and 'pulls them up by their hair before they could even think about drowning and i a moment they were sitting in the boat'. That made my eyes water. 'A cream of a guy' they would say in Dutch. Last but not least d'Artagnan who has come a long way since he started and got to know his friends. He's become so incredibly to the point. Not so impulsive and unhandy anymore but rather 'I want it and how do I get it'-type of man. He's so manly suddenly, not so rash anymore, smart yes and still maybe slightly fast with his tongue but he has learned to keep his nature under control... They all grow so tremendously in their character, I really wqs amazed when I saw that. Dumas had easily been able to just write another adventure story like the first one, but he took another oportunity that was much better...


The four heros...

Does anyone else also think that the characters actually grow in Twenty years Later? Athos: I think he is even more respectable in a way than he was before... His speach to d'Artagnan is so powerful... He's fantastic in his support for Charles I and so worth his title of Count de La Fere... Aramis: He's again so behind-your-back but still so devoted as well to a cause... That first scene he enters the book in is so great with the ladders... And when he comes to save them all in the palace of Mazarin with his army. Brings just a smile to my face, that. Porthos: He is sooooooooo adorable! I mean, he is so devoted to the cause, he is so stupid still but has just learned to not to ask any questions anymore because he doesn't understand anyway... When d'Artagnan makes a plan to escape when they are locked up in Mazarin's palace, that's just so great, when he asks 'and if I strangle him?' Just makes me laugh out loud! And still he can bring tears to your eyes when he refuses to leave the boat without his servants because they are so dear to him. He throws them in the water and 'pulls them up by their hair before they could even think about drowning and in a moment they were sitting in the boat'. That made my eyes water. 'A cream of a guy' they would say in Dutch. Last but not least d'Artagnan who has come a long way since he started and got to know his friends. He's become so incredibly to the point. Not so impulsive and unhandy anymore but rather 'I want it and how do I get it'-type of man. He's so manly suddenly, not so rash anymore, smart yes and still maybe slightly fast with his tongue but he has learned to keep his nature under control... They all grow so tremendously in their character, I really was amazed when I saw that. Dumas had easily been able to just write another adventure story like the first one, but he took another oportunity that was much better...


Catherine the Great of Russia, was she the inspiration?

I know it sounds maybe strange, but a while ago I saw a documentary on Catherine the Grerat of Russia, and it struck me how similar the plots of Queen Anne is to Catherine the Great's story. Catherine was German and was sent with her mother to the Russian court as a suitable wife for the oncoming tzar. He was a little retarded, but she was intelligent. They get married, but dislike each other and they don't have sufficient intercourse to make a baby. So they introduce her to a young Polish duke. They have an affair and have a child. He gets sent away. She has a profound friendship with the British amabassador, and even sells state secrets during the war with England. She almost got cought, but plays it so that she walks free... The people is aggravated more and more with the new tzar and the situation becomes critical. In the mean time Caterine has seen a musketeer and they start an affair. He has two brothers. One is the brains, one is a good fighter, etc. Can't remember what the last one was. They make sure she becomes tzarina, and that the people doesn't think anymore about the nephew of the captured tzar, who is locked up in prison because he was the rightful heir. Orloff (the musketeer) and she have a child as well, but she gets tired of him. In the mean time her husband 'dies' of a 'fever'... In fact, murdered by one of the Orloffs (the three musketeers). Then she sets eyes on another man. He was more intelligent and she could talk to him. She marries him in seret, but never makes it public, because she wants to keep her power, and otherwise she would have to hand it over to her husband, him being the man. The relationship becomes difficult, but they stay together. She sends him on campaign and eventually he dies of some disease and she is distraught. The three musketeers Orloff, each one having a certain good quality, the profound friendship with the British ambassador, the secret marriage... iIcouldn't help thinking about the documentary. On top of that Anne in the book is saddled, not with a retarded king, but with a king who is at least stupid and useless. Remember how he gets bored on the battle field at Rochelle? The country is in a dangerous position, and what does he do, 'he is bored'... How can you get bored in that situation :confused:. You should give your people guidance. Does anyone know whether Dumas got his inspiratin for Anne with Catherine the Great? Otr is it ust a dream of mine?


Mordant

I finished Twenty Years After. I was curious about other people's reaction to Mordaunt. He did go to far with his desire for murder but, there were times I could feel sorry for the guy. Left an orphan at three. Losing his money and postion. I felt with a few twists and written from his point of view Mordaunt could make a case for himself like the Count of Monte Cristo. Sorry about the misspelling. The thoughts are faster then the spelling.


I love this continuance!!!

That book was really dazzling and exciting how all Dumas books are!!!:D I couldnt stop reading until I finished... Why he didnt write more continuance?! :bawling: I would like to read more of this brave hearts with so much tensions! Everybody should read this book :thumbs_up


No Subject

After reading the The Three Musketeers, I decided I wanted to read all of the D'Artagnan romances. This book is the second in the series and takes places 20 years after the original. It is interesting to read an adventure story about men in their middle ages rather than seeing heros that are always young men. Although their lives have gone in completely separate directions, their friendship overcomes their differences. The Musketeer novels are not only entertaining but inspiring.


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