The Dragon's Grandmother




I met a man the other day who did not believe in fairy tales.
I do not mean that he did not believe in the incidents narrated
in them--that he did not believe that a pumpkin could turn into
a coach. He did, indeed, entertain this curious disbelief.
And, like all the other people I have ever met who entertained it,
he was wholly unable to give me an intelligent reason for it.
He tried the laws of nature, but he soon dropped that.
Then he said that pumpkins were unalterable in ordinary experience,
and that we all reckoned on their infinitely protracted pumpkinity.
But I pointed out to him that this was not an attitude we
adopt specially towards impossible marvels, but simply
the attitude we adopt towards all unusual occurrences.
If we were certain of miracles we should not count on them.
Things that happen very seldom we all leave out of
our calculations, whether they are miraculous or not.
I do not expect a glass of water to be turned into wine;
but neither do I expect a glass of water to be poisoned with
prussic acid. I do not in ordinary business relations act
on the assumption that the editor is a fairy; but neither do I
act on the assumption that he is a Russian spy, or the lost
heir of the Holy Roman Empire. What we assume in action is
not that the natural order is unalterable, but simply that it
is much safer to bet on uncommon incidents than on common ones.
This does not touch the credibility of any attested tale
about a Russian spy or a pumpkin turned into a coach.
If I had seen a pumpkin turned into a Panhard motor-car
with my own eyes that would not make me any more inclined
to assume that the same thing would happen again. I should not
invest largely in pumpkins with an eye to the motor trade.
Cinderella got a ball dress from the fairy; but I do not suppose
that she looked after her own clothes any the less after it.

But the view that fairy tales cannot really have happened,
though crazy, is common. The man I speak of disbelieved
in fairy tales in an even more amazing and perverted sense.
He actually thought that fairy tales ought not to be told
to children. That is (like a belief in slavery or annexation)
one of those intellectual errors which lie very near
to ordinary mortal sins. There are some refusals which,
though they may be done what is called conscientiously,
yet carry so much of their whole horror in the very act of them,
that a man must in doing them not only harden but slightly
corrupt his heart. One of them was the refusal of milk to young
mothers when their husbands were in the field against us.
Another is the refusal of fairy tales to children.

. . . . .

The man had come to see me in connection with some silly society
of which I am an enthusiastic member; he was a fresh-coloured,
short-sighted young man, like a stray curate who was too
helpless even to find his way to the Church of England. He had a
curious green necktie and a very long neck; I am always meeting
idealists with very long necks. Perhaps it is that their eternal
aspiration slowly lifts their heads nearer and nearer to the stars.
Or perhaps it has something to do with the fact that so many of
them are vegetarians: perhaps they are slowly evolving the neck of
the giraffe so that they can eat all the tops of the trees in
Kensington Gardens. These things are in every sense above me.
Such, anyhow, was the young man who did not believe in fairy tales;
and by a curious coincidence he entered the room when I had just
finished looking through a pile of contemporary fiction, and had
begun to read "Grimm's Fairy tales" as a natural consequence.

The modern novels stood before me, however, in a stack; and you can
imagine their titles for yourself. There was "Suburban Sue: A Tale
of Psychology," and also "Psychological Sue: A Tale of Suburbia";
there was "Trixy: A Temperament," and "Man-Hate: A Monochrome," and all
those nice things. I read them with real interest, but, curiously enough,
I grew tired of them at last, and when I saw "Grimm's Fairy Tales"
lying accidentally on the table, I gave a cry of indecent joy.
Here at least, here at last, one could find a little common sense.
I opened the book, and my eyes fell on these splendid and satisfying
words, "The Dragon's Grandmother." That at least was reasonable;
that at least was true. "The Dragon's Grandmother!" While I was
rolling this first touch of ordinary human reality upon my tongue,
I looked up suddenly and saw this monster with a green tie standing
in the doorway.

. . . . .

I listened to what he said about the society politely enough,
I hope; but when he incidentally mentioned that he did not believe
in fairy tales, I broke out beyond control. "Man," I said,
"who are you that you should not believe in fairy tales?
It is much easier to believe in Blue Beard than to believe in you.
A blue beard is a misfortune; but there are green ties which are sins.
It is far easier to believe in a million fairy tales
than to believe in one man who does not like fairy tales.
I would rather kiss Grimm instead of a Bible and swear to all
his stories as if they were thirty-nine articles than say
seriously and out of my heart that there can be such a man as you;
that you are not some temptation of the devil or some delusion
from the void. Look at these plain, homely, practical words.
'The Dragon's Grandmother,' that is all right; that is rational
almost to the verge of rationalism. If there was a dragon,
he had a grandmother. But you--you had no grandmother!
If you had known one, she would have taught you to love fairy tales.
You had no father, you had no mother; no natural causes can explain you.
You cannot be. I believe many things which I have not seen;
but of such things as you it may be said, 'Blessed is he that has
seen and yet has disbelieved.'"

. . . . .

It seemed to me that he did not follow me with sufficient delicacy,
so I moderated my tone. "Can you not see," I said, "that fairy
tales in their essence are quite solid and straightforward;
but that this everlasting fiction about modern life is in its
nature essentially incredible? Folk-lore means that the soul
is sane, but that the universe is wild and full of marvels.
Realism means that the world is dull and full of routine, but that
the soul is sick and screaming. The problem of the fairy tale is--
what will a healthy man do with a fantastic world? The problem
of the modern novel is--what will a madman do with a dull world?
In the fairy tales the cosmos goes mad; but the hero does not go mad.
In the modern novels the hero is mad before the book begins,
and suffers from the harsh steadiness and cruel sanity of the cosmos.
In the excellent tale of 'The Dragon's Grandmother,' in all the other
tales of Grimm, it is assumed that the young man setting out on his
travels will have all substantial truths in him; that he will be brave,
full of faith, reasonable, that he will respect his parents,
keep his word, rescue one kind of people, defy another kind,
'parcere subjectis et debellare,' etc. Then, having assumed
this centre of sanity, the writer entertains himself by fancying
what would happen if the whole world went mad all round it,
if the sun turned green and the moon blue, if horses had six legs
and giants had two heads. But your modern literature takes insanity
as its centre. Therefore, it loses the interest even of insanity.
A lunatic is not startling to himself, because he is quite serious;
that is what makes him a lunatic. A man who thinks he is
a piece of glass is to himself as dull as a piece of glass.
A man who thinks he is a chicken is to himself as common as a chicken.
It is only sanity that can see even a wild poetry in insanity.
Therefore, these wise old tales made the hero ordinary and
the tale extraordinary. But you have made the hero extraordinary
and the tale ordinary--so ordinary--oh, so very ordinary."

I saw him still gazing at me fixedly. Some nerve snapped in me
under the hypnotic stare. I leapt to my feet and cried, "In the name
of God and Democracy and the Dragon's grandmother--in the name of all
good things--I charge you to avaunt and haunt this house no more."
Whether or no it was the result of the exorcism, there is no doubt
that he definitely went away.




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