Around the World in Eighty Days


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(1873)



As the 2004 film adaptation of Around the World in Eighty Days opens, two significant events happen. First, we see a Chinese man named Passepartout (played by Jackie Chan) fleeing from the Bank of England, which has just been robbed. Secondly, we meet Phileas Fogg (played by Steve Coogan), an inventor who seems obsessed with creating new and faster modes of transportation. As Fogg's current "Valet" (Test Subject) quits, Passepartout lands in Fogg's garden and volunteers for the job, as it's a convenient way to get away from the police who are pursuing him. When Fogg ventures to the Royal Academy of Science to report his latest findings, he's belittled by the cocky Lord Kelvin (played by Jim Broadbent). After a heated debate, Kelvin jokingly states that Fogg should attempt to traverse the globe in 80 days--and Fogg accepts this challenge. Soon, he and Passepartout set off for Paris, where they will begin their journey. There, they meet Monique La Roche (played by Cécile De France), a struggling artist who decides to tag along on their trip. As Fogg attempts to meet his deadline, the secret of Passepartout's involvement in the robbery is revealed, as are romantic feelings between Fogg and Monique. However, Kelvin has dispatched agents to stop Fogg, making their travels even more challenging.--Submitted by Anonymous.




This great book of adventure is about a man named Phileas Fogg, who takes a wager to go around the world in no more then 80 days. He risks his entire fortune on this bet So he and his French valet Jean Passepartout make a tremendous journey Around The World In Eighty Days.--Submitted by Phileas Fogg.



Around the World in 80 days was written during a time of war between France and Prussia. The story centers around an eccentric English gentleman and his French servant, Passepartout. The English gentleman, Mr. Phileas Fogg, enters into a wager whereby he will circumnavigate the globe and return to his starting point exactly 80 days from the starting date. The wager was between Mr. Fogg and friends in the “Reform Club”, an organization of wealthy men. This voyage would not have been possible earlier than the 1870s as the innovations such as railroad travel and steam engines would have made this time frame impossible. Mr. Phileas Fogg was nothing if not methodical. He diligently planned the entire journey including rail time tables and financial budgeting. The travelers had many adventures along the way. The team had to deal with bank robberies and travel on the backs of elephants. In India, they combated savages that were about to sacrifice a woman. The travelers saved the woman and escaped with their lives. In the United States, the adventures battled native American Indians that attacked their train. Passepartout was captured by the Indians during the fight and Mr. Fogg was forced to delay his travels and give chase to the Indians with a troop of US cavalry at his side. The chase was successful in saving Passepartout, but resulted in Mr. Fogg losing valuable time in his journey. He was now likely to lose his wager. Even though Mr. Fogg and company were now significantly behind schedule, he was not going to give up. The group desperately tried to move very quickly and slowly, but surely, he made up lost time. After 81 days had passed, the travelers entered London. Mr. Fogg believed that he had lost the wager. As methodical and organized as Mr. Fogg was, he did not take into account the fact that by traveling Eastward, he would actually gain an additional day. While Mr. Fogg and Passepartout actually slept 81 times, only 80 days on the calendar in London had passed. Mr. Fogg had won his wager. This work by Jules Verne is one of his classics. It has been made into several movies, including the 1956 version by the same name. That version starred David Niven as Phileas Fogg and Mario Moreno as Passepartout. The 2004 version of 80 days starred Jackie Chan as Passepartout and Stephen Coogan as Mr. Fogg. All in all, this work is a very easy read and an exciting adventure story. Although this is somewhat different than other works by Verne (many of his other works were early science fiction), it is easily one of the classics of the time.--Submitted by Anonymous.




The story begins at England. We are introduced to Fogg, a very precise man who regularly goes to the Reform Club every evening. At one such visit to the club to play cards, he gets into a conversation with his fellow card players as to whether it is possible to go around the world in eighty days. He believes that it is and is challenged to complete the adventure. This is the beginning of the entire plot and from then on we see how Fogg goes around the world and we witness the amazing adventures that he has with his companions. The main plot is based on Fogg’s travels, while other such plots merely support the central theme Fix, the detective follows Fogg all over. He believes that Fogg is the bank robber who has robbed a great sum from the bank of England. He puts obstacles in Fogg’s path just so that he can arrest him whenever he gets the warrant from England. The suspicion that Fogg might be a clever gentleman robber is the sub-theme of the book and the author makes the reader also suspicious. Passepartout too wonders whether his master might be a robber though in his heart he has ample trust in Fogg’s integrity. The plot moves ahead with Fogg striving through various obstacles to reach London in time. He goes through Brindisi, Suez, Bombay, Calcutta, Hong Kong, Yokohama, San Francisco, New York and finally Liverpool. Fix arrests Fogg at Liverpool and this delays our hero. He thinks that he has missed the deadline and hasn't reached London in time when in reality he reached a full day earlier. Thus Fogg wins the wager and in the course of his travels, finds himself a worthy charming, beautiful wife too.--Submitted by ifda.






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Recent Forum Posts on Around the World in Eighty Days

Another School Assignment!

I'm glad I read the book and not the movie that the network's summary appears to highlight. Jules Verne's writing can really place the reader into the story. I found the story intriguing because the main character Fogg could always find a new form of transportation when one avenue was blocked. "No, it was foreseen" -- Fogg's motto -- may be worth adopting! Don't miss reading this classic -- but remember you are in 1873!


a.t.w..i.80.d

i relly enjoyed while reading this novel i red till chapter 10 its really good story


No Subject

It's a very interesting novel.it's my course book in class 8th.


No Subject

I like this novel and I have seen how wonderful our world is ! I want to know why do you like it exactly.If you like ,you can E-mail me,or add my MSN:I will on line every weekend.Thank you for Online-Literature and all the people for the great replies,Thank You Very Much!


One of the best classics

Who says young people aren't interested in reading old-aged stories? -- I'm not the one! The first time i picked up this book was in the school library about 3-4 days ago and now I've finished reading the whole book. Around the World in 80 Days is a readers' classic! I would like to recommend it because the story is enjoyable, exciting and so (even if you mostly think novels are boring) hillarious (my favorite charactor was Passepartout). The author was excellent as in his time to have such an idea to write such a great story. Thumps up!


I love Jules Verne

Jules Verne is my favourite author, his writings convinced me to write about Science Fiction and fantastic adventures.
Around The World In eighty Days is one of his best books, one day I finish reading it and found it very exciting.

Thank You


No Subject

IAround the world in eighty days

MAIN CHARECTERS
Phileas Fogg – a man about forty years old who made a bet with some people at the Reform Club that he could make a tour around the world in eighty days or less
Passepartout - a confident young man who works for Phileas Fogg as a servant
Ralph Thomas & Stuart – the people who bet against Mr. Fogg
Mr. Fix – the detective from Scotland Yard that wants to find Mr. Fogg

CHAPTER 1& 2 July 30, 2004
In chapter one it introduces Phileas Fogg a man who was very rich and apart of the Reform club an exclusive club for rich people. He also looking for a new servant and so he finds Passepartout and young French boy who is looking for work.
In chapter two Passepartout was not sure if he wanted to be a servant but later in the chapter he finds that he does.

Chapter 3&4 July 30, 2004
In chapter three a bank robber steals a package of bank notes worth fifty-five thousand pounds. Later at the Reform club Ralph Thomas and Stuart were talking about the robbery. Then another of man said “The world is big enough for the thief to find some country that is safe for him”. Then Mr. Fogg casually went in the conversation and said, “ It was once” they were all confused Stuart asked “ has the world got smaller?” Mr. Fogg showed them an estimate made by the Daily Telegraph showing how someone could get around the world in eighty days .The men were arguing back and forth until Mr. Fogg said “ I bet twenty thousand…. Pounds that I can make a tour around the world in eighty days or less." So after the whole thing was settled Mr. Fogg went home to get Passepartout and now they packed some of their things the rest they would buy there.

After they’re done packing some of their things they go to the train station and bought two first class ticket’s to go to Suez. On the way over their Mr. Fogg notices that Passepartout is crying when Mr. Fogg asked him why he was crying he answered “In my hurry I forgot to turn off the gas in my room.” Mr. Fogg answer to this was it well burn but you well pay for it.
Chapter 5&6 July 30, 2004
Now almost everyone in London knows about the wager that was made in the Reform club because most newspapers have done an article on it. Now those person have seen newspaper articles they began wagers among themselves. Later that week a dispatch was sent from Suez to the commissioner of police in London saying “ I’ve found the bank robber, Phileas Fogg. Send without delay warrant of arrest to Bombay.”
In chapter six a detective form Scotland Yard named Mr. Fix try’s to find Mr. Fogg and Passepartout. He thinks that they robbed the bank. Mr. Fix later meats Passepartout on the boat going to Bombay and asked him to see his master to visa his passport.
Chapter 7&8
In chapter seven Mr. Fogg goes to see Mr. fix to get his passport visa so he well have proof to show the members of the reform club if he does make his tour around the world in eighty days or less. When Mr. Fogg gets there Mr. fix asks him many questions wile his passport is being checked.
f you don't feel like reading it ive sumized the frist few chapters


do not judge the book by its cover

well, at first i didn't want to read this book. but since it's mandatory for our class to have a book report about it, i was forced to do it. but guess what?!? i love it! from the beginning up to the end! it was fantastic! i think i've just toured the wolrd for reading it in 3 and 1/2 hours!!!!
i love how Verne deliver the characters' personalities--especially Phileus Fogg. ü i really like how he made everything in 'mathematical' way of writing. (though i have to admit... i hate math!)
his chapters were simple but he sees to it that we'll get something when we turn to the next chapter, which really made me glad.
he has a fluid writing of expressing what he wanted in particular chapter. moreover, the book is very practical--specifically in financial descriptions.
all in all, this book is sure a BOMB! i really like it!


This is a great book

**This exotic book that I'm reading in my 7th grade class is one of the most wonderful (but also hard to understand) books in the world. Even though it was difficult to understand at first, me and my classmates finally got the hang of the book. now that we're on chapter 13, it feels like the book can't get anymore exciting. If you ever meet up with this book, please take the time out to read it**


No Subject

I really enjoyed reading this book...
Verne is one of my favourites authores; it is very interesting because I realized how big is our world.. and if you want to go round the world.. you would have some problems ..byeee


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