XXI-XXX





XXI


II. 33. ghar ghar dīpak barai

Lamps burn in every house, O blind one! and you cannot see them.
One day your eyes shall suddenly be opened, and you shall see:
and the fetters of death will fall from you.
There is nothing to say or to hear, there is nothing to do: it is
he who is living, yet dead, who shall never die again.

Because he lives in solitude, therefore the Yogi says that his
home is far away.
Your Lord is near: yet you are climbing the palm-tree to seek
Him.
The Brāhman priest goes from house to house and initiates people
into faith:
Alas! the true fountain of life is beside you., and you have set
up a stone to worship.
Kabīr says: "I may never express how sweet my Lord is. Yoga and
the telling of beads, virtue and vice--these are naught to Him."

XXII


II. 38. Sādho, so satgur mohi bhāwai

O brother, my heart yearns for that true Guru, who fills the cup
of true love, and drinks of it himself, and offers it then to
me.
He removes the veil from the eyes, and gives the true Vision of
Brahma:
He reveals the worlds in Him, and makes me to hear the Unstruck
Music:
He shows joy and sorrow to be one:
He fills all utterance with love.
Kabīr says: "Verily he has no fear, who has such a Guru to lead
him to the shelter of safety!"

XXIII


II. 40. tinwir sāńjh kā gahirā āwai

The shadows of evening fall thick and deep, and the darkness of
love envelops the body and the mind.
Open the window to the west, and be lost in the sky of love;
Drink the sweet honey that steeps the petals of the lotus of the
heart.
Receive the waves in your body: what splendour is in the region
of the sea!
Hark! the sounds of conches and bells are rising.
Kabīr says: "O brother, behold! the Lord is in this vessel of my
body."

XXIV


II. 48. jis se rahani apār jagat men

More than all else do I cherish at heart that love which makes me
to live a limitless life in this world.
It is like the lotus, which lives in the water and blooms in the
water: yet the water cannot touch its petals, they open beyond
its reach.
It is like a wife, who enters the fire at the bidding of love.
She burns and lets others grieve, yet never dishonours love.
This ocean of the world is hard to cross: its waters are very
deep. Kabīr says: "Listen to me, O Sadhu! few there are who
have reached its end."

XXV


II. 45. Hari ne apnā āp chipāyā

My Lord hides Himself, and my Lord wonderfully reveals Himself:
My Lord has encompassed me with hardness, and my Lord has cast
down my limitations.
My Lord brings to me words of sorrow and words of joy, and He
Himself heals their strife.
I will offer my body and mind to my Lord: I will give up my life,
but never can I forget my Lord!

XXVI


II. 75. ōnkār siwae kōī sirjai

All things are created by the Om;
The love-form is His body.
He is without form, without quality, without decay:
Seek thou union with Him!
But that formless God takes a thousand forms in the eyes of His
creatures:
He is pure and indestructible,
His form is infinite and fathomless,
He dances in rapture, and waves of form arise from His dance.
The body and the mind cannot contain themselves, when they are
touched by His great joy.
He is immersed in all consciousness, all joys, and all sorrows;
He has no beginning and no end;
He holds all within His bliss.

XXVII


II. 81. satgur sōī dayā kar dīnhā

It is the mercy of my true Guru that has made me to know the
unknown;
I have learned from Him how to walk without feet, to see without
eyes, to hear without ears, to drink without mouth, to fly
without wings;
I have brought my love and my meditation into the land where
there is no sun and moon, nor day and night.
Without eating, I have tasted of the sweetness of nectar; and
without water, I have quenched my thirst.
Where there is the response of delight, there is the fullness of
joy. Before whom can that joy be uttered?
Kabīr says: "The Guru is great beyond words, and great is the
good fortune of the disciple."

XXVIII


II. 85. nirgun āge sargun nācai

Before the Unconditioned, the Conditioned dances: "Thou and I are
one!" this trumpet proclaims.
The Guru comes, and bows down before the disciple:
This is the greatest of wonders.

XXIX


II. 87. Kabīr kab se bhaye vairāgī

Gorakhnath asks Kabīr:
"Tell me, O Kabīr, when did your vocation begin? Where did your
love have its rise?"
Kabīr answers:
"When He whose forms are manifold had not begun His play: when
there was no Guru, and no disciple: when the world was not
spread out: when the Supreme One was alone--
Then I became an ascetic; then, O Gorakh, my love was drawn to
Brahma.
Brahma did not hold the crown on his head; the god Vishnu was not
anointed as king; the power of Shiva was still unborn; when I
was instructed in Yoga.

I became suddenly revealed in Benares, and Rāmānanda illumined
me;
I brought with me the thirst for the Infinite, and I have come
for the meeting with Him.
In simplicity will I unite with the Simple One; my love will
surge up.
O Gorakh, march thou with His music!"

XXX


II. 95. yā tarvar men ek pakherū

On this tree is a bird: it dances in the joy of life.
None knows where it is: and who knows what the burden of its
music may be?
Where the branches throw a deep shade, there does it have its
nest: and it comes in the evening and flies away in the morning,
and says not a word of that which it means.
None tell me of this bird that sings within me.
It is neither coloured nor colourless: it has neither form nor
outline:
It sits in the shadow of love.
It dwells within the Unattainable, the Infinite, and the Eternal;
and no one marks when it comes and goes.
Kabīr says: "O brother Sadhu! deep is the mystery. Let wise men
seek to know where rests that bird."



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