Justice


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(1910)




Galsworthy's plays deal with social problems, concerned with the naturalistic aspects of life. The play 'Justice' is about Falder, a weak-willed person, who forges a cheque to help Ruth, harassed by her husband Honeywill. Fortunately he is caught, brought to court and imprisoned, justice being done. But Galsworthy talks about the injustice done to Falder who tried to rescue Ruth. He says that from a humanitarian point of view Falder was right on his part in that the decision was partial from the 'blind' rigid side of law showing inhuman nature. The play shows the defect of the legal system in its rigidity in treating prisoners inhumanly and that no follow up is done to rehabilitate the discharged prisoners which in turn alienates them from society.--Submitted by Ankit Gaurav Uppal






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How Far Is the Crime of Falder Supportable?

Crime of any nature is never supportable, nor of Falder. He was given a cheque for encashment. Falder tampered with the figured amount thus mis-appropriated the account. But he had to pay the penalty, enormously multiple in magnitude. In the jail he was treated inhumanly in solitary confinement. Out of the gaol he was an out-cast. He was reabsorbed conditionally. But, the shadow of country's law was in constant pursuit and that caused his doom. So, when the custodian of justice serves little in rectification and worsens the state of the individual, his crime shows microscopic through the macrscope of so called "justice".


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