Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 119

Thread: who's your favorite poet? why?

  1. #16
    laudator temporis acti andave_ya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    At the nearest library
    Posts
    2,489
    Blog Entries
    157
    Haven't read very much, but Wilfred Owen and Rupert Brooke. The War Poets.
    "The time has come," the Walrus said,
    "To talk of many things:
    Of shoes--and ships--and sealing-wax--
    Of cabbages--and kings--
    And why the sea is boiling hot--
    And whether pigs have wings."

  2. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Lancashire, UK
    Posts
    27
    I have a soft spot for the poetry of A.E. Housman. He suffered from unrequited love and so did I. He was a great comfort when I was in trouble.

  3. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    18
    Mine are : Shakespeare's sonnets (obviously).
    I also love John Donne, George Herbert,Milton and Poe. I love some of Marvell's works but generally find him rather difficult to appreciate.

  4. #19
    Procrastinator
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Good Old Albion
    Posts
    167
    I agree with a lot of the choices posted in the thread so far; there are some really good poets here. If I had to pick one I think at the moment I would have to go for William Blake. This is likely to change, though, since if I'd answered the same question a few months ago I'd have probably answered TS Eliot. A few months before that and I may have said Marvell or Donne. Shakespeare is always near the top, too.

  5. #20
    Registered User kelby_lake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    3,620
    Quote Originally Posted by mayneverhave View Post
    T.S. Eliot. Difficulty and obscurity aside, I find his poetry to be some of the most affecting work I have ever read.
    Agreed. I can see the influence on Lolita. Although his poems got a bit tedious when they started going overly religious.

    I quite like Hardy's poems actually, especially Neutral Tones.

    I'm more of a person who likes individual poems: To An Athlete Dying Young, The Tyger, Remember (by Christina Rosetti)...

  6. #21
    aspiring Arthurianist Wilde woman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    grad school in upstate NY
    Posts
    703
    I cannot come up with a single favorite. But recently, I've 'discovered' G.M. Hopkins and I find his sprung rhythm VERY exciting. I enjoy the way he coins hyphenated words and combines them with unusual rhythms and striking imagery to create a really fresh, vivacious brand of poetry. For me, it's very compelling.

    I love Blake, for his deceptively simple songs. Also Keats and Tennyson...who, for me, are the quintessential Romantic poets. And in the Classical vein, Ovid.

  7. #22
    Hopeless Romantic. IndigoStorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    The Friendly City
    Posts
    24
    John Keats ... His life was so short that he must hardly have had time to even edit his work and yet he still managed to produce some of the finest work ever written in the English language.

    His last poem "Bright Star" written on board ship on his way to Italy where he died, is my favourite.
    I have been astonished that men could die martyrs for religion - I have shuddered at it. I shudder no more - I could be martyred for my religion - Love is my religion - I could die for that. John Keats

  8. #23
    I eat words. Moshu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    108
    Blog Entries
    8
    I love Robert Frost, I can really make connections with his poetry. Others would be Milton, Lord Byron, Tennyson, Thomas Carew and Ben Johnson. Oh yes, Emily Dickenson and Edna St. Vincent Millay. =D There's so many; and I'm a sucker for classic poetry...

  9. #24
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    The USA... or thereabouts
    Posts
    6,081
    Blog Entries
    78
    Easily Dante. The Comedia is quite simply unrivaled. I would have no problem with suggesting that it is the single greatest creation in Western literature. Its breadth and depth are equaled only by the collected works of Shakespeare and the Bible. Had Dante not even written this, he would still be a marvelous and important poet. Along with Guido Cavalcanti he brought the sonnet and the sonnet cycle to a new level of depth and complexity. The poems included in the semi-autobiographical La vita nuova are quite marvelous and the entire cycle certainly sets a model for Petrarch, Ronsard Sidney, Spenser, and others.
    Beware of the man with just one book. -Ovid
    The man who doesn't read good books has no advantage over the man who can't read them.- Mark Twain
    My Blog: Of Delicious Recoil
    http://stlukesguild.tumblr.com/

  10. #25
    Acting It Out Diane Havens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    9
    Pablo Neruda, Franz Wright, Shakespeare, T.S. Eliot, Jane Hirshfield, John Keats, Laurence Ferlinghetti, and so many more
    Diane

    dianehavensvo.com
    actingitout.com

  11. #26
    Registered User blithe_spirit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    15
    I never cared much for the War Poets as a group but the poems of Rupert Brooke never fail to move me. Other favourites whose poems have the same effect are Milton, especially 'L'Allegro' and 'Il Penseroso'; Matthew Arnold, especially 'The Scholar Gypsy'; Sylvia Plath and, of course, Shakespeare for his sonnets.
    Last edited by blithe_spirit; 05-09-2009 at 05:50 PM.

  12. #27
    God's love gives me power cute angel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    The world of novels
    Posts
    39
    Emily Dickenson

  13. #28
    Bibliophile JBI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    6,358
    Quote Originally Posted by stlukesguild View Post
    Easily Dante. The Comedia is quite simply unrivaled. I would have no problem with suggesting that it is the single greatest creation in Western literature. Its breadth and depth are equaled only by the collected works of Shakespeare and the Bible. Had Dante not even written this, he would still be a marvelous and important poet. Along with Guido Cavalcanti he brought the sonnet and the sonnet cycle to a new level of depth and complexity. The poems included in the semi-autobiographical La vita nuova are quite marvelous and the entire cycle certainly sets a model for Petrarch, Ronsard Sidney, Spenser, and others.
    Hmm, I'd argue the sonnet would have taken form regardless - I don't particularly think its development was as reliant on Dante as other Dolce stil Nuovo poets, or even radical contemporaries like Cecco Angliolieri who certainly worked a lot more of them. Perhaps the cycle is indebted somewhat to Dante, but I think his influence is more essential in other areas - namely linguistics, and a popularization of themes that would dominate poetry up until this day in the West.

    The Vita Nuova wouldn't have made such a splash over time (it certainly made a splash in its day) had it not been for its appropriation as a prologue for the Comedia. Still, such subjunctive thought goes nowhere - I will agree though, that he was the master, and to date is probably the most essential poet in Western literature, as you call it (I do not group Homer into this category, because quite simply, his inclusion in Western literature is a mere appropriation).

  14. #29
    biting writer
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    when it is not pc, philly
    Posts
    2,184
    You know, I usually balk at these kind of questions, but if I am going to answer this honestly, my favorite poet is a post-modern atheist named Jerry McGuire, and evidently, stalking him down on Google has informed me that I am still in love with him, which should serve as a warning about honesty. Since he taught me Donne, Donne is my second favorite.

    Let me try to add, again, that this board is too conservative; maybe it is natural that students do not read nor seek the influence of living poets, but luke, you know better. Dante is a great poet, but your favorite? In the 21st century? The Comedia is the classic Catholic nightmare, but it is also chock full of petty Florentine blowback. I pricked myself in tracking down my internalized Irish godhead, but at least it was through a contemporary that I learned how to branch out into the canon and the vibrant literary zine culture, one and the same.
    Last edited by Jozanny; 05-10-2009 at 10:12 PM. Reason: cattle prodding

  15. #30
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    The USA... or thereabouts
    Posts
    6,081
    Blog Entries
    78
    Let me try to add, again, that this board is too conservative; maybe it is natural that students do not read nor seek the influence of living poets, but luke, you know better. Dante is a great poet, but your favorite? In the 21st century? The Comedia is the classic Catholic nightmare, but it is also chock full of petty Florentine blowback. I pricked myself in tracking down my internalized Irish godhead, but at least it was through a contemporary that I learned how to branch out into the canon and the vibrant literary zine culture, one and the same.

    Jozie... you are assuming that it is a sign of daring to prefer a contemporary as your favorite... and consequently it is proof of conservatism to admit to a preference for an established master. The reality is that I can't imagine finding the same degree of aesthetic pleasure in any Modern or Contemporary poet as I've found in Dante. Who? T.S. Eliot? Rilke? Montale? Neruda? Geoffrey Hill? None of them come close. As I don't turn to art to reinforce my own experiences and thoughts I don't feel a need for a favorite poet to be closer to my own time... my own experience. I have read the Comedia, the Vita Nuova and the sonnets repeatedly. The only poets I imagine as having read as much or as deeply or with as much pleasure would probably include Baudelaire, Rilke, and certainly Blake. By the same token my favorite composer is J.S. Bach... followed by Mozart and Wagner... in spite of the fact that I quite love Miles Davis, Thelonius Monk, Bob Dylan, and the Rolling Stones. I will admit your may be the preference of the artist for the work of another artist of his or her own time. Without the least hesitation I would place Michelangelo at the pinnacle of Western art... followed by Rembrandt and Rubens... but I just might admit to finding Bonnard to be my personal favorite... if not Max Beckmann. I'll also admit that if the question were broader... if we were asked who was our favorite writer... and if Shakespeare, Dante, and Blake were all off limits... I just might go with J.L. Borges.
    Beware of the man with just one book. -Ovid
    The man who doesn't read good books has no advantage over the man who can't read them.- Mark Twain
    My Blog: Of Delicious Recoil
    http://stlukesguild.tumblr.com/

Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Favorite Poet
    By Admin in forum Poems, Poets, and Poetry
    Replies: 104
    Last Post: 10-04-2009, 03:51 PM
  2. Petrarch's Love is having a birthday!
    By andave_ya in forum General Chat
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 02-15-2009, 02:57 PM
  3. Happy Belated Birthday, Mortis Anarchy!
    By Scheherazade in forum General Chat
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 01-02-2009, 03:31 AM
  4. Favorite Poet
    By sherlock in forum Poems, Poets, and Poetry
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-08-2008, 12:14 AM
  5. My Favorite Chinese Poet
    By joynone in forum Poems, Poets, and Poetry
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-19-2006, 10:57 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •