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Thread: Two works by Poe decoded. Announcement!!

  1. #46
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    Edgar vs Rambo

    Hoping that among our "silent viewers", the distinguished Poe authorities newly invited as above are now included, we now return to Edgar and his personality as revealed in the Announcement so far.

    Attention is next drawn to " The Cask of Amontillado" (published 1846) where our Edgar decides to forever entomb his "Fortunato"-his truth seeking younger irish self- so that "Montresor"- the other side, the "reasoning" scottish obviously, of his schizzo personality- stops being punished anymore from the thousand injuries the sincerity of the former already caused.

    One is again reminded of Dr Fludd's "playne simplicity/Vnity" vs "double dealers, false and treacherous men/Errour's den" eternal conflict between truth and falsehood.

    Other conclusions on Edgar may be drawn from the text but are of limited interest when compared to the observation that this conclusion-that he decides to "bury Truth" to surrvive-is totaly independent of whatever has been revealed so far in the Announcement, ie it can easily be drawn from the text of "The Cask" itself as it will be next explained:

    According to the Concise Oxford Dictionary, "amontillado" metaphoricaly means "of dry speech or manner", ie sincere writing style. Furthemore, whereas he selects the word "Cask"-casket- in the title, later on in the text, he makes the distinction by using another word-pipe-thus the conclusion is indeed easily and independently reached, that Truth is buried.
    The question arise therefore "Why has this simple observation not been made thus far? "

    The "learned scholars" say practicaly nothing at all:

    According to Hammond, "Whether the story is read as an allegory on the eternal conflict between the unimaginative man and the creative artist, or simply as a self-portrait of two aspects of Poe himself, 'The Cask of Amontillado' remains one of his most brilliantly written tales and one which deserves to be included in any anthology of horror."

    At http://www.ivcc.edu/rambo/poe5.htm an english literature teacher named Rambo places 100 or so questions regarding the Cask of Amontillado but "forgets" to ask himself, or his students, the most elementary as above.

    "Silentium inter clamores"
    Last edited by yanni; 05-14-2008 at 03:41 AM. Reason: text correction

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    Edgar vs Rambo continued

    On the subject of the "learned scholars"as well as Edgar's death, a friend suggested a check at http://www.geocities.com/lord_vision...smasons_1b.htm
    There, The Cask of Amontillado as well as other works are mentioned and it is stated that Edgar was against George Washington and Ben Franklin because they were masons.
    It is further implied that his murder had something to do with masons.

    Quoting from the site:

    " 1849-1850 Zachary Taylor, 12th. President of the United States (Whig) Confirmed Mason. Also a member of the Knights Of The Garter.
    1849. October, 7. Edgar Allan Poe was murdered by a blow to the head. Poe was not a drunk or drug addict as history would lead you to believe and did not die from a drug overdose. (John F. Courtney, M.D. Addiction and Edgar Allan (sic) Poe, Resident and Staff Physician, January, 1971 p. 107-115). Poe was exposing the Mason's through many of his short stories. It was inevitable that Poe would not only run afoul of the festering secret society's but end a victim of their 'arguments'. He was not a passive recipient, and he did his best to immortalize a searing indictment in Masonry in at least four of his short stories.
    1. The Cask of Amontillado. A Roman Catholic aristocrat takes revenge on his Freemason enemy by walling him into a corner of the family catacombs, thus destroying his life and freedom by masonry. (Kent Bales, "Poetic justice in the Cask of Amontillado", Poe Studies, 6, 1972, p. 51) Insult is added to injury in this tale since Poe drew its central character and basic narrative situation from the Freemason, Benjamin Franklin. Since the name of Franklin's hero is Montresor and this is of course the name Poe has chosen for his; that his source is indeed Franklin is confirmed by William H. Shurr ("Montresor's Audience" in the 'Cask of Amontillado' Poe Studies, 1, 1977)
    2.The Devil in the Belfry. Published in The Philadelphia Saturday Chronicle of May 18, 1839. Poe satirizes president Martin Van Buren and his corrupt political machine in New York. (Poe's Political Satire, University of Texas studies in English, 35, 1956, 81-95-Burton R. Pollin, City University of New York)
    3. Mellonta Tauta. This criticizes the aura of sanctimony which surrounds Mason George Washington, specifically in a tedious "George Washington cornerstone ceremony" Washington actually laid the cornerstone to the Capitol building in a full Masonic regalia and there is a widely circulated painting of this event. Washington's Masonic Apron "
    4. Never Bet The Devil Your Head. This is Poe's most gruesome portrayal of Masonry and has some parallel to a well-known Masonic story - Kipling's "The Man Who Would Be King" in which esoteric bridge-symbolism forms an important backdrop. The man does not take the advice Poe's story offers and looses his head on a covered bridge. Royal Arch Masonry is obsessed with bridge symbolism (Princess Diana was murdered under a covered bridge) to the same extent that the Masonic grade of Ninth degree is up to it's neck in decapitation ritual.


    (continued)

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    Edgar vs Rambo continued

    The wide but vague accusation against all Freemasons above fails to make any distinction between Edgar's "profrench" party that governed USA from the time of George Washington-Ben Franklin and the "probrits" that prevailed as from Andrew Jackson. The "study" furthermore does not examine the mentioned works in detail thus some comments are deemed necessary:

    Regarding The Cask of Amontillado:
    -"Yanni's" short interpretation above is further confirmed if Edgar's hero, Montresor, is taken to be either John Montresor, the engineer who constructed Fort Mifflin or his father J.G. Montresor, both french protestants who remained loyal british subjects throughout the American War of Independence
    (see http://footguards.tripod.com/01ABOUT...0montresor.htm ).
    There also was a Sir Francis Montresor among Franklin' corresponntents, propably related to the above.
    -Franklin's (Bagatelles) Montresor is dying (as an atheist and is nevertheless granted a place in heaven by Saint Peter), however Edgar's Montresor lives and buries Fortunato, his otherself, a very basic difference. Fortunato is a mason and Montresor pretends also to be one.
    -The "controversial" (G. R. Thompson- Shannon Burns) phrase "you, who so well know the nature of my soul" confirms Yanni's "dual personality" theory and is not at all controversial .

    Regarding The Devil in the Belfry:
    There is nothing indicating an attack against masons by Edgar in this work either. The tale's message is furthermore quite clear: He is being sarcastic to the "political system" in general then and confirms his "free irish spirit", already mentioned in the present "Announcement", by the actions and identity of his hero who concludes his mockery of the "ideal town" by annoyning the ". very red cabbages....out of all time and tune, with both hands, making a great show, the nincompoop! of playing Judy O'Flannagan and Paddy O'Rafferty."

    In his "Mellonta Tauta", written propably April 1848, Edgar is inspired by George Washington's monument inauguration on October 19th 1847 "under the Auspices of the Washington Monument Association of the City of New York" and mocks directly both the republican system, the brits as well as the next US president Zacchary Taylor:

    "As to the how of the surrender, no language can be more explicit. Lord Cornwallis was surrendered (for sausage) "under the auspices of the Washington Monument Association"- no doubt a charitable institution for the depositing of corner-stones.- But, Heaven bless me! what is the matter? Ah, I see- the balloon has collapsed, and we shall have a tumble into the sea. I have, therefore, only time enough to add that, from a hasty inspection of the fac-similes of newspapers, &c., &c., I find that the great men in those days among the Amriccans, were one John, a smith, and one Zacchary, a tailor.
    Good-bye, until I see you again. Whether you ever get this letter or not is point of little importance, as I write altogether for my own amusement. I shall cork the MS. up in a bottle, however, and throw it into the sea. ".


    In "Never Bet The Devil Your Head" Edgar does indeed relate masons to the devil himself (the man with the black silk apron in which he takes away Dammit's head),
    refuses to obey them ("who is he? If he asks me to jump, I won't do it, that's flat, and I don't care who the devil he is") and makes sure he relates them to "The bridge, as I say, was arched and covered in, in a very ridiculous manner, and there was a most uncomfortable echo about it at all times- an echo which I never before so particularly observed as when I uttered the four last words of my remark."
    Edgar ridicules Kant, Emmerson and all transcendentialist ("The end justifies the means, morals are subjective, nothing "in heaven") and suggests that men are all equal in fron of the inevitable:
    "So in the end he grew worse, and at length died, a lesson to all riotous livers."

    Concluding:

    Edgar is well aware of the changes in philosophy also reflected in society and masonic history (french enlightement vs Weishaupt's Illuminism adopted by british lodges under the duke of Sussex) and attacks the latter only through his attack against US presidents belonging to this particular "side".
    Edgar has never attacked either George Washington or Benjamin Franklin, both related to french enlightment philosophy and masonism.

    Edgar never really buries his old "Fortunato" irish self, remains to the bitter end true to this side of his personality and, as he grows older, his writing is evidently more sincere than "conditions allowed". .

    Obviously, everything written on him by "learned scholars", is partial.
    Last edited by yanni; 05-14-2008 at 03:45 AM. Reason: "duke of Sussex" instead of George IV

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    On Edgar, Franklin, freemasonry and the "Stuart" jewels.

    A timeline of the Affaire du collier and Franklin's last letter before leaving France.

    1784

    May.Christening of baby Charles Edward Rohan-Stuart in Paris.

    June The jesuits of Bavaria attack Weishaupt and his gang. Knigge resigns .

    Nov Savalette de Lange(Saint Germain's "boy") suggests Cagliostro and Mesmer should be invited to the congress of Les Plilalethes.

    Dec Cagliostro-as "Grand Copte"- establishes in Lyon "The mysteries of high egyptian masonry". Members receive the flamming star as a badge-symbol and thus participate in "Spiritual alchemy" (see Marsiglio Ficino, Florence).

    1785

    Jan According to the myth La Contesse La Motte-Valois tells cardinal de Rohan of the Queen's desire to purchase the necklace for her. She then orders the necklace from the jewlers on 21st Jan.

    Feb 10th Les Philalethes invite Cagliostro to participate in their gathering, he accepts but then refuses to attend

    March 12 St Germain is happy and writes a poem in favour of the lady where he dines every Wednesday.

    March 27 future King Louis XVII is born

    April 6th Cagliostro writes letter to the congress of les Philalethes and calls all members of the congress to abide by the rules of Egyptian Masonry and requests the archives of Les Philalethes be destroyed. Von Gleichen is ordered to go and meet him.

    12th Cagliostro's demands are rejected.

    13th Cagliostro replies:We offered you the truth but you rejected it. He takes however part in the meetings of the "Grand Orient"

    May 13th Letter by Saint-Martin mentions that Willermoz. encouraged him and that he expects to be called to Lyon to hear and see for himself.

    Ben Franklin's last letter before leaving Paris for the USA (to George Whatley, May 23, 1785).includes, just before the end, following interesting passage:
    "My intended translator of your Piece, the only one I know who understands the _Subject_, as well as the two Languages, (which a translator ought to do, or he cannot make so good a Translation,) is at present occupied in an Affair that prevents his undertaking it but that will soon be over. I thank you for the Notes. I should be glad to have another of the printed Pamphlets."

    May 28th Aug. Graefe in Hamburg, emmisary of The great Lodge of England, confronts Zinnendorff.

    May 29th Correspondence between Saint-Martin καί Willermoz mentions "exquisite revelations", apparition of the "Saviour", resurrection of "Israel" and something magnificent they name "The thing"(La chose) and to phenomena of highest importance.

    Middle of June Attempt against the life of Saint Germain.. .

    June 30th Saint Martin is ready to go to Lyon to see the "thing" with his own eyes. Fifteen months later (Sept 1786) while in Paris declares sorry for his foolishness to have spoken so freely to certain of his brother masons .

    July 4th Saint Martin receives the title "chevalier bienfaisant de la Cite Sainte" (Propably Jerusalem)

    10th A certain "Jacob Lange" is found dead in Ratisbon. Papers found on his body uncover Weishaupt's Illuminati who are then persecuted. (The name chosen indicates the "package" was sent by St Germain).
    Last edited by yanni; 02-12-2006 at 02:12 AM. Reason: corrections

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    The Gold Bug vs. Queen's Necklace

    Yanni, you write in your timeline about "Saint Martin is ready to go to Lyon to see the thing with his own eyes". What is this "thing" he is going to see? Could it be the Queen's Necklace?

    From my first post on this forum I suggested that Edgar's tale The Gold Bug had hidden within a form of secret writing that made the plaintext of the cryptogram of the tale a house for a secret message. What I did not say was that that message alluded to hidden diamonds in a mansion in Philadelphia. The tale The Gold Bug in describing the treasure says that the settings that once held great diamonds were hammered as if to prevent recognition as to what they were. Could there be a common thread between Edgar (and his tale The Gold Bug), Franklin and the Queen's Necklace?

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    The "thing" or "La chose"

    Yanni, you write in your timeline about "Saint Martin is ready to go to Lyon to see the thing with his own eyes". What is this "thing" he is going to see? Could it be the Queen's Necklace?

    Firstly here is what "learned scholars have to say on the Affaire:

    It .....was, according to Nesta Webster, the first act of the revolutionary drama. "The famous 'Affair of the Necklace' can never be understood in the pages of official history: only an examination of the mechanism provided by the secret societies can explain that extraordinary episode which, in the opinion of Napoleon, contributed more than any other cause to the explosion of 1789.
    In its double attack on Church and Monarchy, the Affair of the Necklace fulfilled the purpose of both Frederick the Great and of the Illuminati.
    Cagliostro, we know, received both money and instructions from the Order for carrying out the plot, and after it had ended in his own and the Cardinal de Rohan's exoneration and exile, we find him embarking on fresh secret-society work in London..." According to Eco's chronology, the Affair of the Diamond Necklace was orchestrated by Cagliostro. Dumas describes it as a Masonic plot to discredit the Monarchy.


    Imo the Affaire included the full Stuart regalia(Crown and jewels, sword etc) as well as their claim to the throne of England and was part of a secret treaty.

    See it in the context of the geopolitical events and some keyplayers:

    January 1784 US Congress approves the Treaty of Paris whereby England and France agree the war is over.
    February 1784 Saint Germain declares himself dead in Schleswig Holstein.
    March 1784 Cardinal de Rohan meets Marie Antoinette in Versailles.
    Charles Stuart nominates in his will his brother Cardinal Henry, de jure Duke of York, his sole heir and successor. Henry at the time shares the same roof with his lover, cardinal Cesarini, in Rome. Nobody knows where the Stuart regalia are then.

    ---the timeline as above---

    August 1785, De Rohan , Lamotte and Cagliostro are arrested in Paris.
    May 1786 Cardinal de Rohan is aquitted, deLamotte is condemned but "escapes to London" to join her husband and the "jewels", Cagliostro is released (and is, soon after, received with honors in London but Morande reveals his Balsamo identity).
    July -Important documents are stolen from St Germain's lodgings in Paris.
    -Hamburg Germany: Masons accept the superiority of the Grand Lodge of England.
    August:-French finance minister Calonne presents his reform bill to the King.
    - Zinnendorff is replaced by Von Exter who is appointed rovisional Grand Maitre of Hamburg and Lower Saxony.
    -England and France sign treaty to free commerce.
    -
    -
    -1818. Walter Scott discovers the "Stuart regalia" in Edinborough Castle.

    From my first post on this forum I suggested that Edgar's tale The Gold Bug had hidden within a form of secret writing that made the plaintext of the cryptogram of the tale a house for a secret message. What I did not say was that that message alluded to hidden diamonds in a mansion in Philadelphia. The tale The Gold Bug in describing the treasure says that the settings that once held great diamonds were hammered as if to prevent recognition as to what they were. Could there be a common thread between Edgar (and his tale The Gold Bug), Franklin and the Queen's Necklace?

    As already stated, in his Visionary-Assignation Edgar reveals that he knows the identities of both Sain Germain and "Yanni d'Anastasy", his successor, and their family connection. He propably knows all about the Affaire as well and had some kind of access to the papers of Ben.Franklin while at Jefferson University.

    In my previous post above, reference was made to a passage from Franklin's last letter which refers, imo, to Saint Germain and his involvement in the specific "Affair"!! Franklin believes it will be soon shorted out and his friend will be able then to translate Whatley's piece, ie Franklin is not yet ready to leave Paris then. A couple of weeks later however an assasination attempt is made against St Germain (documentation to be provided when his identity is revealed), so Franklin propably expedites his departure as things are looking already ugly then.

    Imo "The Gold Bug" along with the Beale papers is a fantastic hoax Edgar writes specificaly for his protestant readers fexceeding themselves searching for "treasure" in the most unlikely places. Edgar believes in life after death and heavenly values, they don't!

    It will all be sorted out when St Germain's identity is revealed and "Concino's riddle" is solved early Arpil.

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    Una Birch and Nesta Webster, particularly the latter, are the best available sources for info on secret societies. The "other side" unfortunately, secret societies, still do not believe in opening up their archives to the public.
    Below some quotes on St Germain from their works:

    "...an enigmatic personality of unusual power and numberless parts. He has been dead a little more than a century, and so in time is almost one of ourselves ; he lived surrounded by spies and secret agents ; he took no pains to conceal his habits from the world, and yet he remains a mystery. He was involved in many of the most important events of the eighteenth century and was responsible for much of its diplomacy. Some day, perhaps, his life may be set down as a consecutive story inspired by a definite aim. It is a work worth doing, for it would prove whether Saint-Germain was, as men have so often called him, a charlatan, or whether he was, as some believe him to have been, a political genius of unrivalled ambition and great accomplishment."

    "The Comte de Saint-Germain, another of Weishaupt’s ambassadors, emerges at intervals upon the surface of affairs a brilliant and accomplished personage, and sinks again to work in the great secret service, or to sit, as tradition has it, upon his golden altar in an attitude of Oriental absorption. Saint-Germain was probably not only the secret missionary and entertainer of Louis XV., but also the agent of masonic and other societies working for the regeneration of humanity ; one life was probably only the cloak for the other."
    (No, he was not Weishaupt "ambassador", Cagliostro was and the latter's link to London very revealing).

    "Saint-Germain has been represented by modern writers—not only those who compose his following—as a person of extraordinary attainments, a sort of super-man towering over the minor magicians of his day. Contemporaries, however, take him less seriously and represent him rather as an expert charlatan whom the wits of the salons made the butt of pleasantries. His principal importance to the subject of this book consists, however, in his influence on the secret societies. According to the Mémoires authentiques pour servir à l’histoire du Comte de Cagliostro, Saint-Germain was the “ Grand Master of Freemasonry,”[50] and it was he who initiated Cagliostro into the mysteries of Egyptian masonry."

    also see http://freemasonry.bcy.ca/anti-masonry/webster_n.html on Nesta Webster
    This canadian Lodge attacks Webster and puts St Germain and Cagliostro in "the same basket":
    "She fails to define the part that is not disputed. This vagueness allows her to imply that such colourful charlatans as the Comptes de Saint-Germain and de Cagliostro were persons of influence and authority. She also claims, based on hearsay, that they were both Jews. She uses this as further proof of a Jewish inspiration for the prevalence of occultism and mysticism in pre-revolutionary Europe."

    A charlatan, huh ?

    "Marie Antoinette was deeply interested in matters and men of this nature. De Rohan entertained her with tales of Cagliostro ; she consulted Saint-Germain, and was one of the visitors who clustered round the mysterious fluid of the hypnotic doctor Mesmer, which was calculated to heal all ills, and who listened to his dictum, “ There is but one health, one illness, and one remedy.” Though Mesmer’s experiments were rejected by the French savants of the day as worthless, they were eagerly taken up in other parts of Europe. Mesmer enforced the law of mutual dependence and of unity in the natural world, as Saint-Martin enforced the laws of mutual dependence and of unity in the spiritual world. It might well have been Saint-Martin and not Mesmer who said, “ that the life of man is part of the universal movement,” for they were both exponents of the truth of the solidarity of the race."
    (Una Birch admits here she knows St Germain did not really die earlier on in Germany but was alive at the time of the Affaire, an indication that he was the same person as the "other St Germain-ministre de guerre").

    It will all be soon sorted out!

    BTW St Germain's experiments on "flax", early 1770 in Venice as count Saltycov, refer to his invention of the "brulot"-fire ship (Flax=flox, grk for fire and not flax the plant).
    See:
    http://www.hermetics.org/brc-17.html
    (The Brotherhood of the Rosy Cross By Arthur Edward Waite London, 1924)
    CHAPTER XVII
    SAINT-GERMAIN AND CAGLIOSTRO
    "The Graf Max von Lamberg met him in Venice under an assumed name, engaged in experiments on flax, and in July, 1770, they were staying together at Tunis.He is said also to have been at Leghorn in the same year during a visit of the Russian fleet, when he wore a Russian uniform "and was called Graf Saltikoff by the Graf Alexis Orloff." I have not met with confirmation of this story."
    Last edited by yanni; 02-18-2006 at 05:52 AM. Reason: a note added for clarification

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    St Germain in Britain (1743-45)

    St Germain scouted Britain ahead of the unsuccesfull Stuart invasion of Scotland. He was arested for spying, managed to fool his captors and later charmed the London upper class with his musical talent. The artistic name he adopted as a musician-composer-they said he was at least as good as Handel- was Giovanni (Yanni in grk).

    See following sites below:

    http://www.forteantimes.com/articles...tgermain.shtml

    "...the Count of St-Germain is one of the most intriguing mystery-men of the 18th century."
    By DOUG SKINNER.

    “The Provost of Edinborough is in custody of a messenger, and t’other day they seized an odd man, who goes by the name of Comte St-Germain. He has been here these two years, will not tell who he is or whence, but professes two very wonderful things, the first that he does not go by his right name; and the second that he never had any dealings, or desire to have any dealings with any woman – nay, nor with any succedaneum. He sings, plays on the violin wonderfully, composes, is mad, and not very sensible. He is called an Italian, a Spaniard, a Pole, a somebody that married a great fortune in Mexico, and ran away with her jewels to Constantinople, a priest, a fiddler, a vast nobleman. The Prince of Wales has had unsatiated curiosity about him, but in vain. However, nothing has been made out against him, he is released; and what convinces me that he is not a gentleman, stays here, and talks of his being taken up for a spy.” 2

    Curiously, the Count’s disdain for succedanea was censored by Walpole’s editors until 1954. Maybe they didn’t want to offend succedanea. There’s much to say about this first swatch of gossip; I’ll confine myself to pointing out that the Count is a burlesque figure here, but obviously much talked about. He must have made quite an impression.The next year, some of his music is performed and published in London.

    For the Count's next musical performances in London see:
    http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...01/ai_n9231891

    "He is an Odd Creature, & the more I see him the more curious I am to know something about him. He is everything with everybody: he talks Ingeniously with Mr. Wray, Philosophy with Ld. Willoughby, & is gallant with Miss Yorke, Miss Carpenter & all the Young Ladies. But the Character of Philosopher is what he seems to pretend to, & to be a good deal conceited of: the Others are put on to comply with Les Manieres du Monde, but That you are to suppose his real Characteristick; & I can't but fancy he is a great Pretender in all kinds of Science, as well as that he really has acquired an uncommon Share in some. - Well! so much for Monsr. le Comte de St. Germain, whom neither you nor I have anything to do with, (though he inquir'd very kindly after you)"

    "Horace Walpole reports that Saint-Germain 'spoke Italian and French with the greatest facility, though it was evident that neither was his language; he understood Polish, and soon learnt to understand English and talk it a little. [...] But Spanish or Portuguese seemed his natural language.' Of his musicianship, Walpole writes that 'he sung in a most agreeable taste, but with little or no voice' and characterised his violin playing as exquisite. Lady Jemima concurs that his 'excellence is softness' and that his voice is so quiet (except when he rages) 'that in a large Room it is quite lost'. Walpole's conclusion is that Saint-Germain 'was a man of Quality who had been in or designed for the Church. He was too great a musician not to have been famous if he had not been a gentleman.'"

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    The myth of the two Saint Germains.

    Last two posts were intented to guide the silent viewer to read and learn all about the "mysterious personality" of "charlatan" St Germain as depicted by various "authorities" who, not surprisingly, claim ignorance as to his identity and origins.
    Insisting they don't know who he really was-they claim in fact only Luis XV knew that-they spare no effort to distinguish him from their fictitious "Claude-Luis comte de Saint Germain", war ninister of France (27 October 1775 -27 September 1777).

    Una Birch, linking Saint Germain to Marie Antoinette and the Mesmer period of 1784-5 (see U.B. "Secret Societies and the french revolution" at http://yamaguchy.netfirms.com/una/una_rev.html) doubts the existence of two different Sain Germains and so does Mme Campan in her book on Marie Antoinette (http://www.authorama.com/memoirs-of-...inette-10.html) as per following paragraph:

    "In 1775, on the death of the Marechal du Muy, the ascendency obtained by the sect of innovators occasioned M. de Saint-Germain to be recalled to Court and made Minister of War. His first care was the destruction of the King’s military household establishment, an imposing and effectual rampart round the sovereign power."

    Saint Germain did indeed belong to the "innovators" and furthermore one does not need be a professor of the english language to understand that "To be recalled to court" refers to someone who was already there before, in some official capacity or other-in this case as a foreign policy advisor to the King, a position the real Saint Germain is known to have had -a privilege unfortunately never granted to the "fake" Saint Germain by any french King or by the many "historians" who wrote the virtual biography of "Claude-Luis".

    The one and only Saint Germain acted indeed as the advisor to Luis XV, as his confident embassador to friendly courts and as his spy sometimes. What Mme Campan really says is he maintained this position until Luis XV death in 1774 (in parallel with his opponent in court, the famous de Choiseul until his "disgrace").

    When Saint Germain's identity and origins are revealed, as scheduled* , it will all be sorted out and the point made here is just to show what blundering amateurs the particular "historians" really are.

    A third indication- evidence rather-is of course Edgar himself as described so far in this "Announcement" by the interpretation of Sonnet to Zante, Al Aaraaf and some comments made regarding The Assignation or Visionary.

    This last work is now been studied in more detail and a relative interpretation will follow soon.

    *Early April this year (so that descendents of Saint Germain's in France, a large and important family, as well as any relevant authorities have the time to present their objections if any. They have been already advised by mail post December last).
    Last edited by yanni; 02-27-2006 at 06:49 AM. Reason: date correction

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    EDGAR'S SAINT GERMAIN as per THE ASSIGNATION-VISIONARY

    In previous posts it was stated that Edgar's description of the mysterious man in The Visionary "fits Saint Germain like a glove" and that, in this particular tale, Edgar reveals he knew the true identity of both Saint Germain as well as of Yanni D'Anastasy, his successsor and relative.

    How were these conclusions drawn?

    Edgar's hero has following characteristics:
    - "the graceful person of a very young man, with the sound of whose name the greater part of Europe was then ringing"
    - "who to all the world was still a stranger"
    - "below rather than above the medium size"
    - "Herculean strength which he has been known to wield without an effort, upon occasions of more dangerous emergency. With the mouth and chin of a deity —singular, wild, full, liquid eyes, whose shadows varied from pure hazel to intense and brilliant jet —and a profusion of curling, black hair, from which a forehead of unusual breadth gleamed forth at intervals all light and ivory"
    - "his were features than which I have seen none more classically regular"
    - "wealthy. Report had spoken of his possessions in terms which I had even ventured to call terms of ridiculous exaggeration.."
    - "... peculiarity of spirit which seemed to place him so essentially apart from all other human beings, than by calling it a habit of intense and continual thought, pervading even his most trivial actions —intruding upon his moments of dalliance —and interweaving itself with his very flashes of merriment —"

    He owns a
    "....Palazzo, one of those huge structures of gloomy, yet fantastic pomp, which tower above the waters of the Grand Canal in the vicinity of the Rialto. "
    in which he keeps a rare ancient and modern art art collection
    - the grotesques of the Greek painters, nor the sculptures of the best Italian days, nor the huge carvings of untutored Egypt.
    - my statues —my pictures —my originality of conception in architecture and upholstery —absolutely drunk, eh? with my magnificence?
    a truly "little regal cabinet"
    where he keeps
    - "..some chefs d'oeuvre of the unknown great —and here unfinished designs by men, celebrated in their day, whose very names the perspicacity of the academies has left to silence and to me".

    When his identity is revealed it will be shown that all these rare qualities and characteristics do fit indeed Saint Germain "like a glove" but that's not all:
    As if Edgar knew his tale would be misinterpreted later on by his "fans, enthusiasts learned scholars" etc , he also forsees and provides them with the "cherry to the pie"!:

    - "Once I was myself a decorist" wants his hero saying.

    A decorist?
    Saint Germain?

    The "learned scholars" in various "sources" do describe him as an excelllent musician, an art expert and an amateur painter but was he ever a "decorist" by profession ?

    Yes, the truth is that he also was a famous "master craftsman" an artist whose "decorative" work is to be seen in Museums world wide, in his Louvre and in Versailles, in private collections and in many homes and libraries as well (reproductions).

    (continued)

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    EDGAR'S SAINT GERMAIN as per THE ASSIGNATION-VISIONARY

    (continud from previous post)

    What else does Edgar tell us in his tale?

    Twice, in the introduction, he defines that his work is partly imaginative.

    "ILL-FATED and mysterious man! —bewildered in the brilliancy of thine own and fallen in the flames of thine own youth! Again in fancy I behold thee!.... not —oh not as thou art... Yes! I repeat it-as thou shouldst be"

    Thus his hero, the "mystery man" who promised an hour in paradise (contessa Mentoni) to Edgar, and fooled him through the double suicide , ie Yanni d'Anastasy,his host in the Levant and St Germain's successor, MUST have all qualities and characteristics of his predecessor who died in Paris in 1790, MUST behave accordingly and MUST also have a fitting fate, he must die laughing, a glorious death in action, instead of double suicide together with their beloved (contessa Mentoni impersonating apparently their faith and beliefs)

    He MUST stand:

    "....up There like a Roman statue! He will stand Till Death hath made him marble!"

    Edgar knew of course then, in 1834, that Yanni had instead already selected to stay alive and was doing his best to survive in a world so different from the one St Germain had created in is life time.
    (In short: France the central power of an allied Europe including Russia (and with the greek revolution brewing eversince Orlof, 1770-1774), Britain "contained" and the newly established US, ex brit colony, also profrench. The great religious divide, cause for so many religious wars already, would be bridged by an "all inclusive" new religion, the egyptian rite, intented to accomodate different christian dogmas as well as jews and, possibly muslims as well. The "market forces", the jacobins and finally Napoleon and the brits undid just this plan between 1790 and 1834!)

    Edgar himself also believes, as he admits in Al Aaraaf, that his

    "... world,I left so late was into chaos hurl'd"

    but, loosing all remaining hope after Lafayette's failed coup in 1831 and his disinheritance by Allen, he is in a state of disillusinonment and writes the particular tale blaming Yanni-who was also not favouring Edgar's relation to his daughter "Ianthe" before- for selling to the highest bidder, eversince 1828, his precious scientific greek papyri collection and other egyptian papyri- till then of unknown content- the source of all ancient "wisdom", the "power" of this new "religion of science and gnosis", as well as other relics and works of art from the collection of St Germain.
    Edgar propably knows all about it as he has some relations with a Baltimore Museum as stated before.

    Yanni on the other hand was obliged to live and survive in this "new world" and although his family and himself did their best to create Modern Greece, after 1831 and the murder of governor Capodistria, his homeland is a "protectorate" and he and his family in constant danger as the 1835 murder of his wife and relatives in Zante shows.

    Edgar suspects Yanni for developing too close relations to the brits and has him writing, while crying, a poem in english, a language...

    .....with which I had not believed their author acquainted —afforded me little matter for surprise. I was too well aware of the extent of his acquirements, and of the singular pleasure he took in concealing them from observation, to be astonished at any similar discovery; but the place of date, I must confess, occasioned me no little amazement. It had been originally written London
    .


    ..and goes as far as doubting both the sincerity of his idol as well as his origins, obviously unknown to Edgar...

    ....his answer, if I mistake not, gave me to understand that he had never visited the metropolis of Great Britain. I might as well here mention, that I have more than once heard, (without of course giving credit to a report involving so many improbabilities,) that the person of whom I speak was not only by birth, but in education, an Englishman.

    The poem ...

    written in a hand so very different from the peculiar characters of my acquaintance, that I had some difficulty in recognising it as his own.

    Thou wast that all to me, love,
    For which my soul did pine —
    A green isle in the sea, love,
    A fountain and a shrine,
    etc

    expresses Edgar's deep sorrow for the world he has lost and his memories of the green isle, Zante, where he spent some of the happiest hours of his youth, the birthplace (shrine) of the Rite of Mizraim that inspired the designers of the Great Seal.

    By his

    "With one exception you are the only human being besides myself and my valet, who has been admitted within the mysteries of these imperial precincts, since they have been bedizened as you see!"


    Edgar reconfirms he knows all about St Germain and Yanni (who btw indeed had a vallet named Triantaphyllos). The "one exception" hints at the possibility of a leak-betrayal of Yanni's "St Germain" secret.
    (In 1833 Yanni gives J.G.Wilikinson access to his collection in Alex, see http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/1900/wilk...wilkinson.html or, if site does not load, search for:"ANASTASI (Giovanni) 1780-1860 Drawings of objects in the collection of, c. 1833 MS. Wilkinson dep. e. 60, pp. 242-243a, 244" )

    The tale furthermore relates Yanni-St Germain to Florence (Politian's Orfeo) and Greece (Sparta-Palaiohori) and Edgar reconfirms his presence there before also by using a third "difficult" greek word "Gelasma" (laughter).

    Later on in life Edgar does indeed follow his virtual hero's example, to die laughing, and goes on to mock and ridicule all "enemies" of his old world in his work, therefore any previous statements made refering to his eventual role as a "spy for the brits" are false although the Tale first apoeared under the Title "Assignation", January 1834 (The Lady's Book).
    Possibly Edgar "assigns" to Yanni the ideal qualities and behaviour the latter should have exhibited in Edgar's opinion.
    Last edited by yanni; 02-27-2006 at 04:34 AM. Reason: verse correction

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    A note for the benefit of the unknown silent viewer and the declared Poe scholar- enthusiast. (Innocent bystanders need not read through)!

    You better believe it viewer: In this here Announcement, E.A.Poe's "puzzle" has been solved!

    If ever "scholars" will accept it, it's another matter! They'll certainly find Yanni's "new" Edgar as disturbing as contemporary "critics" and "caretakers" found the original and they'll end up, as usually, counting costs!

    How much good cloth and tailor work was already spent to camouflage Edgar under an "appropriate" motley fool costume, how much ink, paint, solvent and literary "genius" to "interpret" his work "properly".

    But it is quite immaterial what word manipulators and truth benders do, it's no big deal, no surprise, no setback, NOT important.

    Although, as stated, Edgar was not the focus of this research (that's why the Announcement bears the title "Two works decoded" but later on in the proccess other works are decoded as well), Edgar's rare characteristic, to react and not give in to "pressures", remain his own man to the end and stay sincere by choice, makes him a trustworthy source and important material witness.
    His testimony fully supports Yanni's riddle solutions. That IS important!

    Furthermore the way his testimony was "taken", by this peculiar and extraordinary communication between an american 19th century poet and a retired greek engineer of the 21st, IS ALSO important!

    ("Till silence shall knowledge be in the environs of heaven"? You didn't really mean it Edgar, did you?)

    Why is it then not important what the "scholars" do?

    Because more surprises, bigger than Edgar's, are in the works for them:

    When the key to said riddles is provided as scheduled, the stir created will penetrate all "selective hearing" earplugs. .

    As his miracle world is approaching fast, Yanni advises all concerned to "plug-off" accordingly.

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    The Science Of Aegyptology

    Edgar's friend, Giovanni d'Anastasy, remained until now a "mystery" for aegyptologists as well. British records in particular want him to be of armenian origins and insist he was a different person than another "digger" employed by the british consul in Alex, Henri Salt, by the name Giovanni d'Athanasy or "Yanni" This "other" Yanni was italian Belzoni's supervisor and the first european to enter-Belzoni was too big to fit the entrance- the Cheffren Pyramid near Cairo on March 1818 and also the one who downed the Philae Obelisk in 1821 etc.

    Following quote is indicatory: "Giovanni D’Athanasi left Egypt for London, England in 1835. His share of the artifacts that he and his crews helped recover were sold at auctions in 1835, 1837, and 1845. D’Athanasi died nine years later on December 19, 1854. (Written by Andrew Brown, 2003)."

    They "have it" all wrong, the one and only Yanni died in 1860 in Alex ("D'Athanasi's" 1854 death is not supported by what's called "concrete evidence" as research showed. A "cover up" was staged then for some reason or other).

    His biography, compiled following info exchange with competent aegyptologists (they are wellcome to dispute it publicaly if they so desire), when combined with Yanni's family history, leaves no doubt that the two "Giovannis" are one and the same and, over and above any other conclusions reached of historic rather than archaeological interest, also shows that he was an expert "aegyptologist" with a truly immense collection.

    Yanni's collection, partly inherited from his family (the papyri mostly) , led to the creation of the aegyptian departments of Le Louvre, The Leyden Museum in Holland and the British Museum as well . (The papyri known as "Sallier", as well as MANY others, also came originaly from Yanni's "family library". They were propably sold to Sallier earlier on(1800-1820) by Yanni's father, Anastasi, aka Athanasi )

    Yanni's biography will be published herein early April but the following part will be revealed now:

    As it became later on (1835, London) apparent, Yanni "d'Athanasi" was not just (or perhaps at all) "employed" by Henri Salt but was certainly his "business partner". Together therefore they sold "their" first collection of 4000 pieces to Paris France sometime 1825 with Jean-François Champollion, Yanni's friend, acting as intermediary. That is how the the "Aegyptian" department of Le Louvre was first created May, 1826. Shortly after Champollion was appointed its first director-curator. .

    (Noteworthy that an architect LaFontaine set up the collection at Louvre: Yanni himself had a James Lafontaine uncle in Smyrne as from 1796-7 whereas Saint Germain himself was also very well aquainted with Lafontaine, the writer of greek myths and tales.)

    Yanni reassumed his "D'Anastasy" name when appointed consul of Sweden in Alex in 1826 and by this name sold next his famous alchemy papyri to Leyden at the turn of 1827-28, after Navarino and Salt's death. .

    "D'Athanasi" then reappears as follows:

    On May 28th 1835 on Sothebys second edition of a "Catalogue for auction, the property of Henry Salt, on Monday 29th of June 1835 and for eight following days: "Much assistance in the.... present Catalogue ....from Giovanni d'Athanasi who was sent over to this country with the view of rendering every information...., but...as d'Athanasi has prepared for publication a most interesting "Account of his researches in Egypt"....some details in the translation however have delayed publication of the latter."

    According to the above "Advertisement", in the period 1819-1824 Salt employed Yanni in other duties. Some items collected by Salt during this time were sold to France for 10000 pounds in 1826, however "as from 1824 until shortly before Salt's death the 27th Oct 1827 Yanni was collecting on Salt's behalf and sending items to Livorno until early October 1827".

    All the above has already been proven fictitious and furthermore Yanni's own account ("Athanasi, Giovanni d’, A Brief Account of the Researches and Discoveries in Upper Egypt made under the Direction of Henry Salt Esq, London 1836-unfortunately a copy was not made available as requested by the undersigned) is also not to be taken seriously as both his british protectors and relatives (J.G.Wilkinson's brother was married to Yanni's niece in Alex in 1824) as well as Yanni himself, have their reasons not to tell the truth.

    Yanni was "sent over" to London 1834-5 not just to publish this book and assist Sothebys in writing their "catalogue":

    The late Henri Salt "collection" was auctioned and Yanni had an "interest" in it, as the story now goes, but there are faults in this new scenario as well:

    -Letter of Catherwood to Hay 12 Feb 1836:.....Yanni Athanasi has sent a small collection for sale at Sotheby's. They will be brought to hammer in a few days.Just before he quitted England he met a friend of mine in the street and being dressed in deep mourning he was asked the reason and replied that: Signor Madox, non posso piangere, ma mia moglie e morte, e inutile di piangere. (Yanni left London late 1835, Madox met him shortly before).

    -Protocol of the standing comitte of the British Museum dated April 1836: A letter received the 29th of March is read by J.G.Wilikinson: Consul D'Anastasy is offering his collection (stored partly in Livorno and partly in Alexandria) for sale asking 6000 pounds sterling. J.G.W has seen the alexandrian part and is positive re the purchase and the asking price. The board deferred consideration until the british consul in Livorno sees the collection stored there .

    In other words not just the late Henri Salt but also the two "Yannis", all decided, for some reason or other, to get rid of their collection, at the same time.....

    (The two Yannis, coincidentaly, both stored their colection in Livorno as well...)

    And then comes Edgar with his Jan1837-first publ- "Sonnet to Zante" crying for the death of his fair maiden...

    Anyway, this is how Giovanni D'Athanasy or D'Anastasy or Ivan Avanassiev "put to hammer" in 1835, 1837 and 1845 the greatest part of his collection, including 44 papyri, that is now at the Brirish Museum:

    AFTER the murder of his wife and family in Zante.
    Last edited by yanni; 03-01-2006 at 03:35 AM. Reason: minor correction

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    The Science of Aegyptology (continued)

    The number of viewers of last post above neccessitates to address again the subject of Yanni's "magical papyri":

    Quote from earlier post:

    "Yanni had in his possesion until 1828 "magical" papyri used possibly by Saint Germain and certainly by Cagliostro-Balsamo before his capture and imprisonment in Rome. (Known as PGMxii 474-95 and PDMxii 135-64, they are to be found at the National Museum of Antiquities at Leiden Holland and have been the subject of long discussions concerning the presence or not of prophet Abraham in Egypt. Problem is that the holy man's name is followed in the papyri by the name "Walsamo", ie Balsamo written as the name is pronounced in the greek language, propably by Mr Cagliostro himself)."

    These papyri are on their own proof enough of the close links between Yanni and St Germain that will be revealed later on here.

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    Elementary Papyrology

    Let's focus on these papyri further:

    http://www.lightplanet.com/response/...m_egyptian.htm

    1. The first reference occurs in a chapter on how to make a signet ring. One of the steps is to “bring a white stone” and “write this name upon it … : Abraham, friend of m[an].” 3 (PDMxii 6-20; compare Rev. 2:17; D&C 130:10-11; Abr. 3:1.)

    2. The second instance of Abraham’s name occurs in a description of how to use a ring to obtain “success and grace and victory.” As part of his invocation, the petitioner says, “O mighty god, who surpassest all powers, I call upon thee, Iao, Sabaoth, Adonai, Elohim, [six other names], Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, [82 more names].” The first four names are Hebrew for “LORD of hosts, my Lord, God.” (PGMxii 270-321.)

    3. The third mention of Abraham comes from the same papyrus as the first two references. It is accompanied by a picture, a lion couch scene similar to the one in facsimile no. 1 of the book of Abraham, but this picture is oriented in reverse. Part of the text, a love charm, reads: “Let Abraham who … I adjure you by … and incinerate so-and-so daughter of so-and-so. Write these words and draw this image on a new papyrus.” Later in the text we read, “I adjure you spirits of the dead, [by] the dead (pharaohs) 4 and the demon Balsamos and the jackal-headed god and the gods who are with him.” (PGMxii 474-95, PDMxii 135-64.)

    A few explanations are in order: “Balsamos” is probably Baalshammayim (lord of the heavens), an old Phoenician and Canaanite god whom they believed created the earth.



    The text does not read "Abraham" to beginn with, it is in greek and, according to other sholars, it reads "Avrahas" (alpha, beta-pronounced veta- ro, alpha, chi, alpha, sigma)

    So the question arises:

    Why did the old scribe write "Avrahas" (18th cent greek pronunciation of the name as it had then evolved in the Levant ) instead of Avraham as the name was written on the first greek copies of the New Testament?

    An obvious forgery, Yanni says!

    "Baalshammayim"?

    Why not Balsamo, why not "deamon" Cagliostro?

    Was he not the forger who presented himself as the "grand copte" and prophet?

    Did he not himself admit-to get aquitted after his arrest in Paris after the "Affair"- that he worked as a "copyist" for cardinals York (Stuart) and Orsini ? (His only "Memoirs" to his lawyer Thirolier, 1786. Thirolier Jaques was related to the Bourbons and died shortly after).

    What happened to Cagliostro's papyri when they were confiscated in Paris and how did Yanni obtain them?


    Spectrography would define exactly what part of the papyrus is authentic and what not but Leyden has never published any tests made and does not even reply to relative letters from greek amateur aegyptologists.

    There is a tail to this story, a cherry to this pie as well, but why disturb count Cagliostro's law abiding learned descendants?

    Why indeed?
    Last edited by yanni; 03-03-2006 at 03:49 AM. Reason: spelling

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