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Thread: Two works by Poe decoded. Announcement!!

  1. #16
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    POE'S LIGEIA, Part 2

    Do Al Aaraaf's contents confirm and describe exactly the events taking placing in Greece during his visit?
    Let's take first a brief glance at the greek situation during years 1826-27:
    Greece's revolt of 1821 was instigated to counter Britain's alliance with the Sultan. The greek revolutionaries were soon divided , pro and against Britain (same as in the US at the time) and a civil war was fought as from 1823 simultaneously to the revolutionary war. In 1826 the "against" were negotiating a peace treaty with the progressive albanian ruler of Egypt Mehmet Ali whose forces, led by his son Ibrahim, had taken Morea and Missolonghi and were in control of most of "Greece" then with few exceptions. Egypt was aided by many enligthened royalist french-like Lafayette, himself aided by the US in 1824- who were against the jacobine french revolution,its product, Napoleon, and the puppet government that replaced him. Thus the fight was not really against "Greece to be" but resistance to the british conquest of the Levant.
    Those same greeks who had started and fought for the revolution had already made their choice: By maintaining good relations with Egypt and negotiating next another peace treaty with the Sultan, they thought they could maintain their food sources and continue trading grain with both Egypt and the Black Sea, their traditional trading partners.
    Edgar's "four bright suns" however had other plans('Twas a sweet time for Nesace- for there Her world lay lolling on the golden air, Near four bright suns- a temporary rest-An oasis in desert of the blest. Of the four bright suns only England, France and Russia have recognised historicaly their Navarino role, one "sun" is therefore missing! See further "Thy will is done, O God! The star hath ridden high Thro' many a tempest, but she rode Beneath thy burning eye " The star who rode so high as to get too close to the "burning eye" is Zante- Ianthe- Greece. For the "Star" and the "burning eye" see the end.)
    Tzar Alexander of Russia, who had witnessed as a child the murder of his father through THE conspiracy at the turn of the century, was a weak Tzar controlled more or less by the brits and in constant fear of a revolution against him.
    The joint fleets of Alexander's Russia, "puppet" France, Britain (and obvioulsy the USA-only Edgar and the ship's log document their participation as the Monroe Doctrine did not provide for "international intervention") destroyed the Egyptian fleet at Navarino.
    Greece did not immediately become a british protectorate. Governor Capodistria, appointed shortly after Navarino, also maintained an "against" policy and was therefore murdered in 1831.
    Coming back to Edgar:
    He told us already that he "lived through" modern greek Ligeia, he learned the word from greeks, that he witnessed and discussed all their stress and agony, then in their 6th year of their revolt against the Sultan, in their 4th of the civil war, facing then in addition to all that, the fleets of the joined "suns".He confessed furthermore that he himself, "Angelo", had been long slumbered by Nesace's witchery, obviously not as strong as the "spell" cast against her in "Lemnos" as below:

    "Ianthe, dearest, see- how dim that ray!
    How lovely 'tis to look so far away!
    She seem'd not thus upon that autumn eve
    I left her gorgeous halls- nor mourn'd to leave.
    That eve- that eve- I should remember well-
    The sun-ray dropp'd in Lemnos, with a spell
    On th' arabesque carving of a gilded hall
    Wherein I sate, and on the draperied wall-
    And on my eyelids- O the heavy light!
    How drowsily it weigh'd them into night!
    On flowers, before, and mist, and love they ran
    With Persian Saadi in his Gulistan:
    But O that light!- I slumber'd- Death, the while,
    Stole o'er my senses in that lovely isle
    So softly that no single silken hair
    Awoke that slept- or knew that he was there.


    After Ligeia's failure, he himself, Angelo, attempts to persuade his endangered beloved, yet then unfaithfull (On flowers, before, and mist, and love they ran, With Persian Saadi in his Gulistan) Ianthe-Zante before the battle, to give in to the superior strength before her but that she would not listen.
    He calls her a beautifull but stubborn and unfaithfull witch, says he was not sorry for their separation, that he was in fact ever so gentle and discreet, like a ghost perhaps or something similar but......

    "We came- and to thy Earth- but not to us
    Be given our lady's bidding to discuss:
    We came, my love; around, above, below,
    Gay fire-fly of the night we come and go,
    Nor ask a reason save the angel-nod
    She grants to us, as granted by her God-
    But, Angelo, than thine grey Time unfurl'd
    Never his fairy wing O'er fairier world!
    Dim was its little disk, and angel eyes
    Alone could see the phantom in the skies,
    When first Al Aaraaf knew her course to be
    Headlong thitherward o'er the starry sea-
    But when its glory swell'd upon the sky,
    As glowing Beauty's bust beneath man's eye,
    We paused before the heritage of men,
    And thy star trembled- as doth Beauty then!"
    Thus, in discourse, the lovers whiled away
    The night that waned and waned and brought no day.
    They fell: for Heaven to them no hope imparts
    Who hear not for the beating of their hearts.


    aaaah, Angelo, you can't have it both ways, you cannot be sarcastic to those who hear the beating of their hearts and call yourself a poet ....shame on you!

    Anyway, the answer to the question above is Yes, they do.

    End of Part II
    Last edited by yanni; 12-30-2005 at 02:43 AM. Reason: spelling

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    POE'S LIGEIA, Part III

    Does his correspondence, before and after, confirm his greek expedition and explain his exact role?
    Reading through his correspondence with his foster father, one sees that Edgar declares himself insulted after hearing Allen calling him names so he leaves the Allens on March 18th, 1827 determined to: .....place myself [in] some situation where I may not only o[bt]ain a livelihood....indeavor to find some place in this wide world, where I will be treated — not as you have treated me — This is not a hurried determination, but one on which I have long considered — and having so considered my resolution is unalterable" He suggests Allen complies to his demands or else"....If you fail to comply with my request, I tremble for the consequence". but is totaly broke and starving "I am in the greatest necessity, not having tasted food since Yesterday morning. I have no where to sleep at night, but roam about the Streets — I am nearly exhausted— I sail on Saturday —I have not one cent in the world to provide any food".
    We have thus a determined young man who has long prepared his departure, as he says, knows propably where he is going, does not care to take with him the necessary means and is burdened by a complaining stomach . Allen may have or have not helped him. He then disappears and, in the long interval until he sets foot on land again, Edgar is registered only once simply as "enlisted under the name Edgar A. Perry May 26, 1827" The source does not disclose place of enlistment.
    Until his next letter to Allen from Fort Moultrie, Charleston harbor, December 1st 1828, 18 months elapse, he is nowhere to be seen, total vacuum, no records, no letters, nothing at all to document his "long considered determination", his overflowing energy, his enthusiasm, his presence anywhere.

    Assuming the passage from the East Coast to the Aegean Sea to last between four to six weeks, Edgar reached Athens somehow privately when the Constitution was there as well, ie May 1827, enlisted then and there (The last spot of Earth's orb I trod upon Was a proud temple call'd the Parthenon-he finds himself in a totally different world next) for a five year term) and undertook his "unknown diplomatic" duties, possibly as translator (french-english, hence perhaps his greek friends) and a double agent as well (" we came.... below").
    Because it is a very different Edgar indeed who writes to Allen, December 1st, 1828, upon his return:
    "But, at no period of my life, have I regarded myself with a deeper satisfaction -- or did my heart swell with more honourable pride -- The time may come (if at all it will come speedily) when much that appears of a doubtful nature will be explained away, and I shall have no hesitation in appearing among my former connexions -- at the present I have no such intention, and nothing, short of your absolute commands, should deter me from my purpose. "
    Allen, mumbling "he had better remain as he is until the termination of his enlistment.", appears to have long lost hope in his adoptee, propably just another investment for him.
    A month later, (Jan. 1) signor Edgar Perry is promoted to Sergeant-Major of his regiment, "the highest rank open to an enlisted man".Yet Edgar has higher expectations, wants out, purchases a substitute, is released April 15, 1829, moves to Baltimore in May (7 or 8), manages to have his butchered Al Aaraaf printed by Hatch and Dunning in December, horses around a while, leaves Baltimore for the West Point June 1830 and, less than a year later , for some reason or other, reabandons his military career, leaves New York and returns to Baltimore before May 6, 1831, ready to leave the States for ever and either join Lafayette or the polish army.
    Is it idealism that leads his merrygoround or does his heart attempt to fill his wallet's vacuum?
    Propably the last as his previous involvement in the ++ game at Navarino shows: After leaving Ianthe to her fate and having survived the battle (I slumber'd- Death) he is being sarcastic, declares very proud for the role he played, for his "Dim... little disk, and angel eyes" and is set to benefit from his experience as well. A split personality that is not trusted by either side. How he must have envied his Ianthe!

    Answer: His "greek expedition" participation is evident and reconfirmed by his promotion. His role in Greece "dim", his "angel eyes" bifocal.

    End of Part III (one more to follow sometime later).
    Last edited by yanni; 12-30-2005 at 02:46 AM. Reason: fond change

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    POE'S LIGEIA, Part IV

    PART IV

    How does Ianthe further relate to Ligeia?
    Edgar learned, months later, of the 1835 murder of the man's wife in Zante and there is no evidence as to how he learned it. There are however many indications: .
    The Constitution visited Corfu, the seat of the british governor of the Ionian isles, July 30th, 1836. The ship returned home in 1838, thus Edgar propably received a letter regarding the event sometime October 1836. He was married shortly before and had already written his "Marriage vow". Towards the end of the year Whitte reacts to his sudden change of behaviour for the worse, the Sonnet is published in January, Edgar is then dismissed from the Messenger and moves from Richmond.
    Whereas his "Vow" is an obvious selfish expression of his communication difficulties with his young wife and also a "product of the mind", his Sonnet is-finally-passionate, a sigh from a broken heart. He is not crying for Zante the isle but Ianthe, the woman-flower that died. He is therefore lying again but his passion is sincere. The Sonnet IS a poem.
    He tries to recover, never mentions Ianthe-Zante again but...he remains "stuck" with a murder that troubles his conscience:
    He spends a lot of time remembering, writing and tearing paper and remorse and, when quoting twenty months later Clanvill, it is Ligeia, the corpse attempting a ressurection, that replaces and symbolises his murdered Ianthe of the Sonnet, the lovely wife of his "friend" who, by not yielding to the "superior" powers, was paid back through his wife's and brother's murder by the "clan" who next took over "Zante"-Greece. (Secretly changing sides after 1831, they were supported by the brits who dissolved the Ionian Parliament in 1835 at the time of the murder and established next an autocratic banana- protectorate. They all killed "Zante" and Edgar knew).
    Ligeia, the blackhaired siren, the corpse with the earpiercing voice, reappeared in the Baltimore American Museum, September 18, 1838.

    What happened to our heroes next?
    The woman:Nothing is known of the name and origins of the murdered Ianthe. We do know that she was so brave as to have followed and stayed with her man to a most remote, strange and dangerous place. Her presence in Zante and the murder itself have been crosschecked. Some daugthers have been registered in saved correspondence one of which became possibly an opera singer .

    The man, Edgar's friend, was an exceptionaly well educated, multi talented and versatile person. He spoke modern and ancient languages and resembled in so many ways the mysterious San Germain (four aliases discovered already) one can easily qualify him as the next "San Germain". They were afterall related.
    A top ranking diplomat of the greek revolutionary government from 1822 to 1826, his whereabouts from July 1826 to September 1827 are unknown. His lifelong best friend however, a frenchman, was Ibrahim's aide de camp at Navarino, an indication that he was also close by.
    When his wife was killed he was seen, late 1835, in London. wearing mourning black clothes. When asked, he replied: Signor M****, non posso piangere, ma mia moglie e morte, e inutile di piangere. He left London shortly after.
    He totally allienated himself from Modern Greece after the murder, lived in wealth and died in peace at the age of 80 in the country of his choice. His biography, partly compiled with info supplied by select relevant authorities, has been deposited to same since August 2005. If ever published it will be, like the present, part of a larger book.

    Edgar, who had propably learned of the man's family and role both from books at Jefferson' s University as well as from his foster father, died broke and broken but he had his dream fulfilled. He did become a poet afterall.

    Allen lived long enough to supervise the sabotaged "frigates order" turn into a joke: From about five ordered only one arrived much later when it was no more needed.. No penalties were ever paid as Alex Contostavlos, the greek negotiator, was heavily bribed by Allen's friends.

    The murderer, a famous poet himself and with a most flexible spine as well (until the murder was carrried out on his orders) ceased writing thereafter, locked himself in and died an alcoholic early 1857.
    He was fingerpointed for his role in the murder in two letters published in Athens 1999 and 2000, the second by a major newspaper on day 1821 is celebrated. Silence followed eversince.

    San Germain's biography was easy to compile when his true identity was discovered earlier this year: Apart from his "secret" role as war minister of the Bourbons 1771-1779, he was a famous enlightened-he gave the "light" to the word- man of the 18th century and, but for his origins, diplomatic and ministerial duties and relative friends worldwide, his biography was already written as a half truth! The other half was possibly considered of "limited publication interest" as it concerned, mostly and fundamentaly, the creation of modern Greece, democratic France and the USA. The "halfbiographer" is since considered a top "gens de lettres" in France

    The star of Tycho Brache was taken, when it appeared, as a sign for the battle of Lepanto(1571) that determined the fate of the "West" then. As the true heroes of our story as well as Don Quixote, Edgar's favorite, relate to this battle, it is relevant. The star itself disappeared soon after and Tycho then disputed Galileo's truth along with a catholic priest who had a brother who called him stupid however and became himself a famous astronomer. His descendends are relevant to this story as well.

    The other star, the pentagon symbol used extensively by our Edgar and his great country, has nothing to do with Tycho's or any of the others claiming proprietory rights. It has everything to do with the comet of 1652-53 that was "patented" soon after in Florence. It is this star that appears on the Great Seal together with the "eye" on the pyramid and all other "mystery" symbols.

    Edgar's Not long the measure of my falling hours, For nearest of all stars was thine to ours must always precede any serious meditation on history, literature and opera buffa.

    Written to the memory of "Yanni the greek" by his co-kin.
    Athens, Dec 29th 2005.

  4. #19
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    There seems to be a prophetic element in Poe as well:

    She ceas'd- and buried then her burning cheek
    Abash'd, amid the lilies there, to seek
    A shelter from the fervor of His eye;
    For the stars trembled at the Deity.
    She stirr'd not- breath'd not- for a voice was there
    How solemnly pervading the calm air!
    A sound of silence on the startled ear
    Which dreamy poets name "the music of the sphere."
    Ours is a world of words: Quiet we call
    "Silence"- which is the merest word of all.

    Happy New Year all.

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    Reading through "favorite poem of the week" I reread Edgar's Anabelle Lee and realised he is still talking of Ianthe in 1849.
    The identity of the dark haired bright greek maiden who enchanted Edgar is now known but needs doublechecking(Her name and description are on the web, her biography is not, like all other 'heroes" of this story.)
    Whatever is found will be disclosed when this thread is moved to E.A.Poe's "section" or the views reach 3000, whichever comes sooner.
    Last edited by yanni; 01-02-2006 at 09:33 AM.

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    Epiphany

    Edgar confirms all the above and further reveals his double acting role in "The Visionary" where he describes in the person of the allmighty mystery man the original San Germain to the most minute detail. ALL characteristics given fit San Germain like a glove.

    Thus Edgar discloses to the now enlightened silent reader:

    a) That he knew both the true identities of San Germain and his successor as well as their relationship.
    b) Our hero's political role until then and the difficult position he was in at the time (1833) as he is really cornered then by his opponents, the "probritish" party..
    c) Edgar himself was acting as a double agent and, in close contact with "London", participated in a plot to take out or neutralise the man by murdering his child or wife or both.The plot is then in its final planning stage.

    The change of title is also quite indicatory:

    He selects "The Visionary" before the deed when the plot is in the planning stage and chenges it later (post mortem) to "The Assignation", revealing thus the assasination as well as Edgar's relative role (assignment).

    Edgar traded in his famous grandfather for a place under the (new) sun.....BUT.......

    " Ha! ha! ha! — ha! ha! ha!.....
    But pardon me, my dear sir, (here his tone of voice dropped to the very spirit of cordiality,) pardon me, my dear sir, for my uncharitable laughter. You appeared so utterly astonished. Besides, some things are so completely ludicrous that a man must laugh or die. To die laughing must be the most glorious of all glorious deaths!"



    ("The Visionary," later called "The Assignation," was first published in Godey's Lady's Book in January, 1834. Subsequent publication history: On August 7, 1835, "The Visionary" appeared in the Southern Literary Messenger. Later, in July of 1839, Poe's poem, "To Ianthe in Heaven," excerpted from "The Visionary," was reprinted in Burton's in Philadelphia. Bentley's Miscellany also reprinted " The Visionary" in December of 1840 without acknowledgement. On June 7, 1845, Poe's revised tale "The Assignation," was reprinted in the Broadway Journal. The revisions made to the "The Assignation" were progressive improvements.)
    Last edited by yanni; 01-06-2006 at 06:28 AM. Reason: spelling

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    Literary Steganography

    Did Edgar Allan Poe hide a secret message in his tale The Gold Bug?

    Is the plaintext of the tale actually housing a secret message itself?

    I think so.....a message of hidden wealth.

    Write me at:

    [email protected]

    Legrand

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    I don't really know and cryptography does not agree with me. Anyway Edgar died broke.

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    Concino......

    ....is to blame for all this.

    (This is a riddle for the really serious researcher. The one who finds what the message is, will receive a piece of turkish delight for reward)

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    What if Concino was not just shooting blanks?

    Ha! ha! ha! — ha! ha! ha!.....
    But pardon me, my dear sir, (here his tone of voice dropped to the very spirit of cordiality,) pardon me, my dear sir, for my uncharitable laughter. You appeared so utterly astonished. Besides, some things are so completely ludicrous that a man must laugh or die. To die laughing must be the most glorious of all glorious deaths!"

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    Concino's role in world history has been grossly underrated.
    He is central in our story, however strange it may appear.

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    Recap:
    It is concluded that Edgar was a double agent. His participation in a plot to neutralize Giovanni or Jean d'Anastasy, the collector of antiques and papyri also known as d'Athanasy or "Yanni" (see the web or ask for more details here) is evident and, after intepreting of The Visionary as well, it is quite possible Edgar's surname was not even "Poe" to begin with:
    -His birthdate and family details are too obscure for a general's grandson, he was given an identity and was send to the Levant as Poe so that doors would be opened to him as they did.
    -In London previously he was known as Edgar Allen all along and in the army he used the Perry name for other similar reasons (his role while at Jefferson's college).
    -His foster father Allen's business dealings regarding the sabotaged greek frigates order (1823-1830) should really be further investigated by researchers in corresponding US archives.

    Concern is expressed hereby that there has really been no response for the first ever interpretation of Edgar's Al Aaraaf, Sonnet to Zante, LIGEIA and The Visionary-Assignation as above or furthemore for statements made concerning the star symbol and its origins.

    Re Concino's usolved riddle: Yanni's prize will be placed in the freezer for future generations.

    See you all there.

  13. #28
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    A friend asked me two relevant questions:

    Answering your two basic questions partly with quotes form Al Aaraaf:

    "Do you think Franklin could have been involved in the Diamond Necklace Affair during his exploits in France (based on your timeline)?"
    'Nor long the measure of my falling hours,For nearest of all stars was thine to ours-'

    -The timeline supplied shows Franklin left Europe shortly after the attempt against the life of his friend Saint Germain. Also, some days before or after his departure, Les Philalethes refused to recognize Cagliostro's masonry, ie french enlightened royalists were still strong then although the jewels were already gone. The tides turned in favour of the probrit side (which included Weishaupt and Cagliostro) early 1786 AFTER the theft at Saint Germain's lodgings which included possibly the archives of The Nine Muses and Les Philalethes (both controlled until then by the ageing Sain Germain).
    In short I don't think Franklin was involved in the "affaire" but his departure was propably hurried because of the events.

    "Do we know where Edgar came from then?"
    'Dread star! that came, amid a night of mirth,A red Daedalion on the timid Earth.'

    If you read the Announcement you'll notice that a certain "George Townsend Washington" is mentioned in the itinerary of The Constitution:
    "....to recover the body of George Townsend Washington, a relative of the first US president, killed then in the greek civil war), visits then Chio and Efessos early May, Aegina May 10th, Athens May 14-17th, Paros May 17-21th, Petsai-Tsirigo May 29-31st, then back Smyrne June 8th where it "seems to" be on a holiday stationed until the middle of November.."

    You'll notice perhaps, as I did yesterday thanks to our communication, that the time relates very closely to the "enlistment" date of private Edgar Allen Perry to the US army. I assumed until now that Edgar used the name "Poe" to gain access to the profrench side then. I was wrong: Nobody knew "Poe" in Greece but everybody knew "Washington" then, so if a double agent wanted to impress "Washington" would be the proper name to use.

    Checked the greek encyclopedia ("Helios") this morning: G.T.W. is registered as "the president's nephew" arriving to Greece in 1825, complaining to the provisional government -when they apply to the Brits late 1825 for protection-and is killed as above in Napoli di Morea.

    A year or so ago I had searched the web for the name G.T.W but did not find anything at all.I assume that if a nephew of the US president had really died in Greece then, he would be commemorated from both sides until today. Well, he is not!

    Concluding:

    Edgar Allen Poe , US double agent working for "the brits", arrived as George Townsend Washington in The Levant, spent his time between Zante-Venice and Livorno (1825-1826) princely but when the man, whose guest he was, took his family and fled Zante, Edgar boarded the USS Constitution. There never was a real "George Townsend Washington nephew" in Greece and he never died here either. .

    If you feel up to it go ahead and look for GTW on your own and let me know. From my side I'll have to correct the "Announcement" accordingly, cause the last thing I want is to be taken for the fool I really am.

    Funny isn't it?

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    William Townsend Washington


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    Mr George Chryssis, a prominent (see *below) american from the island of Crete, is the only "authority" on the subject and part of what he has written "American Philhellenes and the Greek War for Independence" can be seen at http://www.helleniccomserve.com/gree...ependence.html

    I say "part" because, apart from exctracts A and B below.....

    A: "Leading the fundraising efforts in Baltimore was Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, a signatory of the Declaration of Independence, and in Philadelphia the leader was Mathew Carey."

    B: "Other American philhellenes who went to Greece to offer their services during the Revolution were George Wilson of Providence, Rhode Island, who excelled in bravery during the naval battle at Nafpaktos; James Williams, an African American from Baltimore who joined the Greek Navy forces; Estwick Evans from New Hampshire, who left behind his wife and children in order to fight the Greek War for Independence; captain JOHN M. ALLEN and WILLIAM TOWNSEND WASHINGTON Washington, a distant relative of president George Washington, who despite his erratic personal behavior and colorful life-style he was fearless and brave and fell heroically fighting in the battle of Palamidi."

    ....Mr Chryssis, in an ealrier version of his study (to be found at the site of a Mr Fotios Basagiannis who has copied him verbatim but did not then edit the original text of Mr Chryssis, the following text "C" is also to be found:

    C: "....W.T. Washington. (The last had fallen in love with Rosa Botsari, the daughter of Markos Botsaris (great revolution hero) , but she was killed in a battle in Nafplion."

    Possibly Mr Chryssis has withdrawn the paragraph above because "she" was not killed in Nafplion(in fact she died in 1875) but he- as per myth- was. She, on the other hand, could not have been the "amour" of Mr "Washington"(The daughter of Marco Botsaris, Catherine or Rosa, was born in 1818 and, was only 9 years old in 1827) and furthermore she was then captive of a turkish Pasha. There are thus two mistakes in the text and Mr Chryssis did well do withdraw it but still many questions arise:

    1.If Rosa was not the fair maiden of Mr "Washington-Poe" then who was?
    and
    2.Who supplied the wrong info in the first place and why?
    and
    3.Who was captain John M. Allen if not the "virtuous quaker" of the Announcement, ie Mr "Poe-Washington"'s father?
    and
    4.With all these scholars flying around how did Mr William Townsend Washington on arrival to Greece become George T. W.?
    and
    5. What does Mr Chryssis mean by the "erratic personal behavior and colorful life-style" of Mr "Washington"?
    and
    6. Is this Mr Mathew Carey the same perhaps as the the Mathew Carey-printer friend of General Lafayette as well as Mr Edgar Allen Poe? (see http://www.eapoe.org/works/criticsm/slm36021.htm#Martin and other texts relating the two men)

    There are other questions concerning the role of other american philhellenes as well, but these suffice for now.

    Perhaps Mr Chryssis would care to comment?

    *George C. Chryssis is a successful entrepreneur, philanthropist, civic activist, poet and author. He is a past supreme President of the Pancretan Association of America, a member of AHEPA, an Archon of the Ecumenical Patriarchate, a member of the Greek Archdiocese of America Leadership 100, former Vice Chairman of the Board of Trustees at Hellenic College, and Trustee of Northeastern University and Wentworth Institute of Technology. He is a founder and a former publisher of "The Hellenic Voice", a national newspaper serving the Greek American community. George, has written and published several literary essays, technical articles, editorials and commentaries, as well as four poetry books (in both Greek and English), and an internationally acclaimed and highly recognized technical book in English (with a Chinese translation). For his contributions, activities and accomplishments, he has received numerous awards, citations and recognitions. He lives and works in Boston, Massachusetts.)

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