Bartlett's Familiar Quotations

A Collection of Passages, Phrases, and Proverbs Traced to Their Sources in Ancient and Modern Literature


The following 1395 quotes match your criteria:


Author: William Shakespeare
I would fain die a dry death.
The Tempest. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground.
The Tempest. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
What seest thou else
In the dark backward and abysm of time?
The Tempest. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I, thus neglecting worldly ends, all dedicated
To closeness and the bettering of my mind.
The Tempest. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Like one
Who having into truth, by telling of it,
Made such a sinner of his memory,
To credit his own lie.
The Tempest. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
My library
Was dukedom large enough.
The Tempest. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Knowing I lov’d my books, he furnish’d me
From mine own library with volumes that
I prize above my dukedom.
The Tempest. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
From the still-vexed Bermoothes.
The Tempest. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I will be correspondent to command,
And do my spiriting gently.
The Tempest. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Fill all thy bones with aches.
The Tempest. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Come unto these yellow sands,
  And then take hands:
Courtsied when you have, and kiss’d
  The wild waves whist.
The Tempest. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Full fathom five thy father lies;
  Of his bones are coral made;
Those are pearls that were his eyes:
  Nothing of him that doth fade
But doth suffer a sea-change
Into something rich and strange.
The Tempest. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The fringed curtains of thine eye advance.
The Tempest. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
There ’s nothing ill can dwell in such a temple:
If the ill spirit have so fair a house,
Good things will strive to dwell with ’t.
The Tempest. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Gon. Here is everything advantageous to life.
Ant. True; save means to live.
The Tempest. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A very ancient and fish-like smell.
The Tempest. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows.
The Tempest. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Fer. Here ’s my hand.
Mir. And mine, with my heart in ’t.
The Tempest. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
He that dies pays all debts.
The Tempest. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A kind
Of excellent dumb discourse.
The Tempest. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Deeper than e’er plummet sounded.
The Tempest. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits, and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, t
The Tempest. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
With foreheads villanous low.
The Tempest. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Deeper than did ever plummet sound
I ’ll drown my book.
The Tempest. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Where the bee sucks, there suck I;
In a cowslip’s bell I lie.
The Tempest. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Merrily, merrily shall I live now,
Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.
The Tempest. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Home-keeping youth have ever homely wits.
The Two Gentleman of Verona. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have no other but a woman’s reason:
I think him so, because I think him so.
The Two Gentleman of Verona. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, how this spring of love resembleth
The uncertain glory of an April day!
The Two Gentleman of Verona. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
And if it please you, so; if not, why, so.
The Two Gentleman of Verona. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
O jest unseen, inscrutable, invisible,
As a nose on a man’s face,
The Two Gentleman of Verona. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
She is mine own,
And I as rich in having such a jewel
As twenty seas, if all their sand were pearl,
The water nectar, and the rocks pure gold.
The Two Gentleman of Verona. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
He makes sweet music with th’ enamell’d stones,
Giving a gentle kiss to every sedge
He overtaketh in his pilgrimage.
The Two Gentleman of Verona. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
That man that hath a tongue, I say, is no man,
If with his tongue he cannot win a woman.
The Two Gentleman of Verona. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Except I be by Sylvia in the night,
There is no music in the nightingale.
The Two Gentleman of Verona. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A man I am, cross’d with adversity.
The Two Gentleman of Verona. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Is she not passing fair?
The Two Gentleman of Verona. ACT IV Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
How use doth breed a habit in a man!
The Two Gentleman of Verona. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
O heaven! were man
But constant, he were perfect.
The Two Gentleman of Verona. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Come not within the measure of my wrath.
The Two Gentleman of Verona. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I will make a Star-chamber matter of it.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
All his successors gone before him have done ’t; and all his ancestors that come after him may.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
It is a familiar beast to man, and signifies love.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Seven hundred pounds and possibilities is good gifts.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Mine host of the Garter.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I had rather than forty shillings I had my Book of Songs and Sonnets here.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
If there be no great love in the beginning, yet heaven may decrease it upon better acquaintance, when we are married and have more occasion to know one another: I hope, upon familiarity will grow more contempt.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
O base Hungarian wight! wilt thou the spigot wield?
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
“Convey,” the wise it call. “Steal!” foh! a fico for the phrase!
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Sail like my pinnace to these golden shores.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Tester I ’ll have in pouch, when thou shalt lack,
Base Phrygian Turk!
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thou art the Mars of malcontents.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Here will be an old abusing of God’s patience and the king’s English.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
We burn daylight.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
There ’s the humour of it.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Faith, thou hast some crotchets in thy head now.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Why, then the world ’s mine oyster,
Which I with sword will open.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
This is the short and the long of it.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Unless experience be a jewel.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Like a fair house, built on another man’s ground.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
We have some salt of our youth in us.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I cannot tell what the dickens his name is.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
  What a taking was he in when your husband asked who was in the basket!
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, what a world of vile ill-favour’d faults
Looks handsome in three hundred pounds a year!
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Happy man be his dole!
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have a kind of alacrity in sinking.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
As good luck would have it.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
  The rankest compound of villanous smell that ever offended nostril.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
A man of my kidney.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Think of that, Master Brook.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Your hearts are mighty, your skins are whole.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
In his old lunes again.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
So curses all Eve’s daughters, of what complexion soever.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
This is the third time; I hope good luck lies in odd numbers…. There is divinity in odd numbers, either in nativity, chance, or death.
The Merry Wives of Windsor. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thyself and thy belongings
Are not thine own so proper as to waste
Thyself upon thy virtues, they on thee.
Heaven doth with us as we with torches do,
Not light them for themselves; for if our virtues
Did not go forth of us, ’t were all
Measure for Measure. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
He was ever precise in promise-keeping.
Measure for Measure. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Who may, in the ambush of my name, strike home.
Measure for Measure. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I hold you as a thing ensky’d and sainted.
Measure for Measure. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
A man whose blood
Is very snow-broth; one who never feels
The wanton stings and motions of the sense.
Measure for Measure. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
He arrests him on it;
And follows close the rigour of the statute,
To make him an example.
Measure for Measure. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Our doubts are traitors,
And make us lose the good we oft might win
By fearing to attempt.
Measure for Measure. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
The jury, passing on the prisoner’s life,
May in the sworn twelve have a thief or two
Guiltier than him they try.
Measure for Measure. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall.
Measure for Measure. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
This will last out a night in Russia,
When nights are longest there.
Measure for Measure. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Condemn the fault, and not the actor of it?
Measure for Measure. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
No ceremony that to great ones ’longs,
Not the king’s crown, nor the deputed sword,
The marshal’s truncheon, nor the judge’s robe,
Become them with one half so good a grace
As mercy does.
Measure for Measure. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Why, all the souls that were, were forfeit once;
And He that might the vantage best have took
Found out the remedy. How would you be,
If He, which is the top of judgment, should
But judge you as you are?
Measure for Measure. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The law hath not been dead, though it hath slept.
Measure for Measure. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, it is excellent
To have a giant’s strength; but it is tyrannous
To use it like a giant.
Measure for Measure. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
But man, proud man,
Drest in a little brief authority,
Most ignorant of what he ’s most assured,
His glassy essence, like an angry ape,
Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven
As make the angels weep.
Measure for Measure. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
That in the captain ’s but a choleric word
Which in the soldier is flat blasphemy.
Measure for Measure. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Our compell’d sins
Stand more for number than for accompt.
Measure for Measure. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
The miserable have no other medicine,
But only hope.
Measure for Measure. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A breath thou art,
Servile to all the skyey influences.
Measure for Measure. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Palsied eld.
Measure for Measure. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The sense of death is most in apprehension;
And the poor beetle, that we tread upon,
In corporal sufferance finds a pang as great
As when a giant dies.
Measure for Measure. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The cunning livery of hell.
Measure for Measure. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Ay, but to die, and go we know not where;
To lie in cold obstruction and to rot;
This sensible warm motion to become
A kneaded clod; and the delighted spirit
To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside
In thrilling region of thick-ribbed ice;
Measure for Measure. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The weariest and most loathed worldly life
That age, ache, penury, and imprisonment
Can lay on nature, is a paradise
To what we fear of death.
Measure for Measure. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The hand that hath made you fair hath made you good.
Measure for Measure. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful.
Measure for Measure. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
There, at the moated grange, resides this dejected Mariana.
Measure for Measure. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, what may man within him hide,
Though angel on the outward side!
Measure for Measure. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Take, O, take those lips away,
  That so sweetly were forsworn;
And those eyes, the break of day,
  Lights that do mislead the morn:
But my kisses bring again, bring again;
Seals of love, but sealed in vain, sealed in va
Measure for Measure. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Every true man’s apparel fits your thief.
Measure for Measure. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
We would, and we would not.
Measure for Measure. ACT IV Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
A forted residence ’gainst the tooth of time
And razure of oblivion.
Measure for Measure. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Truth is truth
To the end of reckoning.
Measure for Measure. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
My business in this state
Made me a looker on here in Vienna.
Measure for Measure. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
They say, best men are moulded out of faults,
And, for the most, become much more the better
For being a little bad.
Measure for Measure. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
What ’s mine is yours, and what is yours is mine.
Measure for Measure. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The pleasing punishment that women bear.
The Comedy of Errors. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A wretched soul, bruised with adversity.
The Comedy of Errors. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Every why hath a wherefore.
The Comedy of Errors. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Small cheer and great welcome makes a merry feast.
The Comedy of Errors. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
One Pinch, a hungry lean-faced villain,
A mere anatomy.
The Comedy of Errors. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A needy, hollow-eyed, sharp-looking wretch,
A living-dead man.
The Comedy of Errors. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let ’s go hand in hand, not one before another.
The Comedy of Errors. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
He hath indeed better bettered expectation.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A very valiant trencher-man.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
He wears his faith but as the fashion of his hat.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
What, my dear Lady Disdain! are you yet living?
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
There ’s a skirmish of wit between them.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The gentleman is not in your books.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Shall I never see a bachelor of threescore again?
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Benedick the married man.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
He is of a very melancholy disposition.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
He that hath a beard is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than a man.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
As merry as the day is long.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have a good eye, uncle; I can see a church by day-light.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Speak low if you speak love.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Friendship is constant in all other things
Save in the office and affairs of love:
Therefore all hearts in love use their own tongues;
Let every eye negotiate for itself
And trust no agent.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Silence is the perfectest herald of joy: I were but little happy, if I could say how much.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Lie ten nights awake, carving the fashion of a new doublet. He was wont to speak plain and to the purpose.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more,
  Men were deceivers ever,—
One foot in sea and one on shore,
  To one thing constant never.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Sits the wind in that corner?
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Shall quips and sentences and these paper bullets of the brain awe a man from the career of his humour? No, the world must be peopled. When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
From the crown of his head to the sole of his foot,
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Every one can master a grief but he that has it.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Are you good men and true?
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
To be a well-favoured man is the gift of fortune; but to write and read comes by nature.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The most senseless and fit man.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
You shall comprehend all vagrom men.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
2 Watch. How if a’ will not stand?
Dogb. Why, then, take no note of him, but let him go; and presently call the rest of the watch together, and thank God you are rid of a knave.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Is most tolerable, and not to be endured.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
If they make you not then the better answer, you may say they are not the men you took them for.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The most peaceable way for you if you do take a thief, is to let him show himself what he is and steal out of your company.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I know that Deformed.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The fashion wears out more apparel than the man.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I thank God I am as honest as any man living that is an old man and no honester than I.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Comparisons are odorous.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
If I were as tedious as a king, I could find it in my heart to bestow it all of your worship.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
A good old man, sir; he will be talking: as they say, When the age is in the wit is out.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, what men dare do! what men may do! what men daily do, not knowing what they do!
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, what authority and show of truth
Can cunning sin cover itself withal!
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I never tempted her with word too large,
But, as a brother to his sister, show’d
Bashful sincerity and comely love.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have mark’d
A thousand blushing apparitions
To start into her face, a thousand innocent shames
In angel whiteness beat away those blushes.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
For it so falls out
That what we have we prize not to the worth
Whiles we enjoy it, but being lack’d and lost,
Why, then we rack the value; then we find
The virtue that possession would not show us
Whiles it was ours.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The idea of her life shall sweetly creep
Into his study of imagination,
And every lovely organ of her life,
Shall come apparell’d in more precious habit,
More moving-delicate and full of life
Into the eye and prospect of his soul.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Masters, it is proved already that you are little better than false knaves; and it will go near to be thought so shortly.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The eftest way.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Flat burglary as ever was committed.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Condemned into everlasting redemption.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, that he were here to write me down an ass!
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A fellow that hath had losses, and one that hath two gowns and every thing handsome about him.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Patch grief with proverbs.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Men
Can counsel and speak comfort to that grief
Which they themselves not feel.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Charm ache with air, and agony with words.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is all men’s office to speak patience
To those that wring under the load of sorrow,
But no man’s virtue nor sufficiency
To be so moral when he shall endure
The like himself.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
For there was never yet philosopher
That could endure the toothache patiently.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Some of us will smart for it.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I was not born under a rhyming planet.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Done to death by slanderous tongues.
Much Ado about Nothing. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Or, having sworn too hard a keeping oath,
Study to break it and not break my troth.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Light seeking light doth light of light beguile.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Small have continual plodders ever won
  Save base authority from others’ books.
These earthly godfathers of heaven’s lights
  That give a name to every fixed star
Have no more profit of their shining nights
&n
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
At Christmas I no more desire a rose
Than wish a snow in May’s new-fangled mirth;
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A man in all the world’s new fashion planted,
That hath a mint of phrases in his brain.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A high hope for a low heaven.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
And men sit down to that nourishment which is called supper.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
That unlettered small-knowing soul.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A child of our grandmother Eve, a female; or, for thy more sweet understanding, a woman.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Affliction may one day smile again; and till then, sit thee down, sorrow!
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The world was very guilty of such a ballad some three ages since; but I think now ’t is not to be found.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The rational hind Costard.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Devise, wit; write, pen; for I am for whole volumes in folio.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A man of sovereign parts he is esteem’d;
Well fitted in arts, glorious in arms:
Nothing becomes him ill that he would well.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A merrier man,
Within the limit of becoming mirth,
I never spent an hour’s talk withal.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Delivers in such apt and gracious words
That aged ears play truant at his tales,
And younger hearings are quite ravished;
So sweet and voluble is his discourse.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
By my penny of observation.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The boy hath sold him a bargain,—a goose.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
To sell a bargain well is as cunning as fast and loose.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A very beadle to a humorous sigh.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
This senior-junior, giant-dwarf, Dan Cupid;
Regent of love-rhymes, lord of folded arms,
The anointed sovereign of sighs and groans,
Liege of all loiterers and malcontents.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A buck of the first head.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
He hath never fed of the dainties that are bred in a book; he hath not eat paper, as it were; he hath not drunk ink.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Many can brook the weather that love not the wind.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
You two are book-men.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Dictynna, goodman Dull.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
These are begot in the ventricle of memory, nourished in the womb of pia mater, and delivered upon the mellowing of occasion.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
For where is any author in the world
Teaches such beauty as a woman’s eye?
Learning is but an adjunct to ourself.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
It adds a precious seeing to the eye.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
As sweet and musical
As bright Apollo’s lute, strung with his hair;
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
From women’s eyes this doctrine I derive:
They sparkle still the right Promethean fire;
They are the books, the arts, the academes,
That show, contain, and nourish all the world.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
He draweth out the thread of his verbosity finer than the staple of his argument.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Priscian! a little scratched, ’t will serve.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
They have been at a great feast of languages, and stolen the scraps.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
In the posteriors of this day, which the rude multitude call the afternoon.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
They have measured many a mile
To tread a measure with you on this grass.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let me take you a button-hole lower.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have seen the day of wrong through the little hole of discretion.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A jest’s prosperity lies in the ear
Of him that hears it, never in the tongue
Of him that makes it.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
When daisies pied and violets blue,
  And lady-smocks all silver-white,
And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue
  Do paint the meadows with delight,
The cuckoo then, on every tree,
Mocks married men.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The words of Mercury are harsh after the songs of Apollo.
Love’s Labour ’s Lost. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
But earthlier happy is the rose distill’d
Than that which withering on the virgin thorn
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
For aught that I could ever read,
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, hell! to choose love by another’s eyes.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Swift as a shadow, short as any dream;
Brief as the lightning in the collied night,
That in a spleen unfolds both heaven and earth,
And ere a man hath power to say, “Behold!”
The jaws of darkness do devour it up:
So quick bright t
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind;
And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Masters, spread yourselves.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
This is Ercles’ vein.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I ’ll speak in a monstrous little voice.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am slow of study.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
That would hang us, every mother’s son.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I will roar you as gently as any sucking dove; I will roar you, an ’t were any nightingale.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A proper man, as one shall see in a summer’s day.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The human mortals.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The rude sea grew civil at her song,
And certain stars shot madly from their spheres
To hear the sea-maid’s music.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
And the imperial votaress passed on,
In maiden meditation, fancy-free.
Yet mark’d I where the bolt of Cupid fell:
It fell upon a little western flower,
Before milk-white, now purple with love’s wound,
And maidens call it love-in-i
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I ’ll put a girdle round about the earth
In forty minutes.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
My heart
Is true as steel.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I know a bank where the wild thyme blows,
Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows,
Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine,
With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A lion among ladies is a most dreadful thing.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Bless thee, Bottom! bless thee! thou art translated.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Lord, what fools these mortals be!
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
So we grew together,
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have an exposition of sleep come upon me.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen,
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The lunatic, the lover, and the poet
Are of imagination all compact:
One sees more devils than vast hell can hold,
That is, the madman: the lover, all as frantic,
Sees Helen’s beauty in a brow of Egypt:
The poet’s eye, in a fine f
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
For never anything can be amiss,
When simpleness and duty tender it.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The true beginning of our end.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The best in this kind are but shadows.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A very gentle beast, and of a good conscience.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
This passion, and the death of a dear friend, would go near to make a man look sad.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The iron tongue of midnight hath told twelve.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
My ventures are not in one bottom trusted,
Nor to one place.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Now, by two-headed Janus,
Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Though Nestor swear the jest be laughable.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
You have too much respect upon the world:
They lose it that do buy it with much care.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano,—
A stage, where every man must play a part;
And mine a sad one.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Why should a man whose blood is warm within,
Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster?
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
There are a sort of men whose visages
Do cream and mantle like a standing pond.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am Sir Oracle,
And when I ope my lips, let no dog bark!
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I do know of these
That therefore only are reputed wise
For saying nothing.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Fish not, with this melancholy bait,
For this fool gudgeon, this opinion.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
In my school-days, when I had lost one shaft,
I shot his fellow of the selfsame flight
The selfsame way, with more advised watch,
To find the other forth; and by adventuring both,
I oft found both.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
They are as sick that surfeit with too much, as they that starve with nothing.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Superfluity comes sooner by white hairs, but competency lives longer.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
If to do were as easy as to know what were good to do, chapels had been churches, and poor men’s cottages princes’ palaces.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The brain may devise laws for the blood, but a hot temper leaps o’er a cold decree.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
He doth nothing but talk of his horse.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
God made him, and therefore let him pass for a man.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
When he is best, he is a little worse than a man; and when he is worst, he is little better than a beast.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I dote on his very absence.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
My meaning in saying he is a good man, is to have you understand me that he is sufficient.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Ships are but boards, sailors but men: there be land-rats and water-rats, water-thieves and land-thieves.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you, walk with you, and so following; but I will not eat with you, drink with you, nor pray with you. What news on the Rialto?
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him.
He hates our sacred nation, and he rails,
Even there where merchants most do congregate.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
A goodly apple rotten at the heart:
O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath!
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Many a time and oft
In the Rialto you have rated me.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog,
And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Shall I bend low, and in a bondman’s key,
With bated breath and whispering humbleness.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
For when did friendship take
A breed for barren metal of his friend?
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
O father Abram! what these Christians are,
Whose own hard dealings teaches them suspect
The thoughts of others!
The Merchant of Venice. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Mislike me not for my complexion,
The shadow’d livery of the burnish’d sun.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The young gentleman, according to Fates and Destinies and such odd sayings, the Sisters Three and such branches of learning, is indeed deceased; or, as you would say in plain terms, gone to heaven.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The very staff of my age, my very prop.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
It is a wise father that knows his own child.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
An honest exceeding poor man.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Truth will come to sight; murder cannot be hid long.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
In the twinkling of an eye.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
And the vile squeaking of the wry-necked fife.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
All things that are,
Are with more spirit chased than enjoy’d.
How like a younker or a prodigal
The scarfed bark puts from her native bay,
Hugg’d and embraced by the strumpet wind!
How like the prodigal doth she return,
With ov
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
Must I hold a candle to my shames?
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
But love is blind, and lovers cannot see
The pretty follies that themselves commit.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
All that glisters is not gold.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Young in limbs, in judgment old.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Even in the force and road of casualty.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 9.

Author: William Shakespeare
Hanging and wiving goes by destiny.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT II Scene 9.

Author: William Shakespeare
If my gossip Report be an honest woman of her word.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
If it will feed nothing else, it will feed my revenge.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions?
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The villany you teach me I will execute, and it shall go hard, but I will better the instruction.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Makes a swan-like end,
Fading in music.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Tell me where is fancy bred,
  Or in the heart or in the head?
How begot, how nourished?
  Reply, reply.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt
But being season’d with a gracious voice
Obscures the show of evil?
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
There is no vice so simple but assumes
Some mark of virtue in his outward parts.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thus ornament is but the guiled shore
To a most dangerous sea.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The seeming truth which cunning times put on
To entrap the wisest.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
An unlesson’d girl, unschool’d, unpractised;
Happy in this, she is not yet so old
But she may learn.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Here are a few of the unpleasant’st words
That ever blotted paper!
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The kindest man,
The best-condition’d and unwearied spirit
In doing courtesies.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thus when I shun Scylla, your father, I fall into Charybdis, your mother.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let it serve for table-talk.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
A harmless necessary cat.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
What! wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice?
The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am a tainted wether of the flock,
Meetest for death: the weakest kind of fruit
Drops earliest to the ground.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I never knew so young a body with so old a head.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The quality of mercy is not strain’d,
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest:
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes.
’T is mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes
The throned mo
The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel!
The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Is it so nominated in the bond?
The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is not in the bond.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Speak me fair in death.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
An upright judge, a learned judge!
The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A second Daniel, a Daniel, Jew!
Now, infidel, I have you on the hip.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I thank thee, Jew, for teaching me that word.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
You take my house when you do take the prop
That doth sustain my house; you take my life
When you do take the means whereby I live.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
He is well paid that is well satisfied.
The Merchant of Venice. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank!
Here we will sit and let the sounds of music
Creep in our ears: soft stillness and the night
Become the touches of sweet harmony.
Sit, Jessica. Look how the floor of heaven
Is thick inlaid with
The Merchant of Venice. Act. v. Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am never merry when I hear sweet music.
The Merchant of Venice. Act. v. Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The man that hath no music in himself,
Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds,
Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils;
The motions of his spirit are dull as night,
And his affections dark as Erebus.
Let no such man be trusted.
The Merchant of Venice. Act. v. Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
How far that little candle throws his beams!
So shines a good deed in a naughty world.
The Merchant of Venice. Act. v. Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
How many things by season season’d are
To their right praise and true perfection!
The Merchant of Venice. Act. v. Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
This night methinks is but the daylight sick.
The Merchant of Venice. Act. v. Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
These blessed candles of the night.
The Merchant of Venice. Act. v. Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Fair ladies, you drop manna in the way
Of starved people.
The Merchant of Venice. Act. v. Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
We will answer all things faithfully.
The Merchant of Venice. Act. v. Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Fortune reigns in gifts of the world.
As You Like It. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The little foolery that wise men have makes a great show.
As You Like It. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Well said: that was laid on with a trowel.
As You Like It. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Your heart’s desires be with you!
As You Like It. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
One out of suits with fortune.
As You Like It. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Hereafter, in a better world than this,
I shall desire more love and knowledge of you.
As You Like It. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
My pride fell with my fortunes.
As You Like It. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Cel. Not a word?
Ros. Not one to throw at a dog.
As You Like It. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, how full of briers is this working-day world!
As You Like It. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Beauty provoketh thieves sooner than gold.
As You Like It. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
We ’ll have a swashing and a martial outside,
As many other mannish cowards have.
As You Like It. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Sweet are the uses of adversity,
Which like the toad, ugly and venomous,
Wears yet a precious jewel in his head;
And this our life, exempt from public haunt,
Finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks,
Sermons in stones, and good i
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The big round tears
Coursed one another down his innocent nose
In piteous chase.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
“Poor deer,” quoth he, “thou makest a testament
As worldlings do, giving thy sum of more
To that which had too much.”
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Sweep on, you fat and greasy citizens.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
And He that doth the ravens feed,
Yea, providently caters for the sparrow,
Be comfort to my age!
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
For in my youth I never did apply
Hot and rebellious liquors in my blood.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Therefore my age is as a lusty winter,
Frosty, but kindly.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, good old man, how well in thee appears
The constant service of the antique world,
When service sweat for duty, not for meed!
Thou art not for the fashion of these times,
Where none will sweat but for promotion.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Ay, now am I in Arden: the more fool I. When I was at home I was in a better place; but travellers must be content.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I shall ne’er be ware of mine own wit till I break my shins against it.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Under the greenwood tree
Who loves to lie with me.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
I met a fool i’ the forest,
A motley fool.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
And rail’d on Lady Fortune in good terms,
In good set terms.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
And then he drew a dial from his poke,
And looking on it with lack-lustre eye,
Says very wisely, “It is ten o’clock:
Thus we may see,” quoth he, “how the world wags.”
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
And so from hour to hour we ripe and ripe,
And then from hour to hour we rot and rot;
And thereby hangs a tale.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
My lungs began to crow like chanticleer,
That fools should be so deep-contemplative;
And I did laugh sans intermission
An hour by his dial.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Motley ’s the only wear.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
If ladies be but young and fair,
They have the gift to know it; and in his brain,
Which is as dry as the remainder biscuit
After a voyage, he hath strange places cramm’d
With observation, the which he vents
In mangled forms.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
I must have liberty
Withal, as large a charter as the wind,
To blow on whom I please.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
The “why” is plain as way to parish church.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Under the shade of melancholy boughs,
Lose and neglect the creeping hours of time;
If ever you have look’d on better days,
If ever been where bells have knoll’d to church,
If ever sat at any good man’s feast.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
True is it that we have seen better days.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
And wiped our eyes
Of drops that sacred pity hath engender’d.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Oppress’d with two weak evils, age and hunger.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
All the world ’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Blow, blow, thou winter wind!
Thou art not so unkind
As man’s ingratitude.
As You Like It. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
The fair, the chaste, and unexpressive she.
As You Like It. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
It goes much against my stomach. Hast any philosophy in thee, shepherd?
As You Like It. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
He that wants money, means, and content is without three good friends.
As You Like It. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
This is the very false gallop of verses.
As You Like It. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let us make an honourable retreat.
As You Like It. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
With bag and baggage.
As You Like It. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, wonderful, wonderful, and most wonderful wonderful! and yet again wonderful, and after that out of all hooping.
As You Like It. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Answer me in one word.
As You Like It. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I do desire we may be better strangers.
As You Like It. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Time travels in divers paces with divers persons. I ’ll tell you who Time ambles withal, who Time trots withal, who Time gallops withal, and who he stands still withal.
As You Like It. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Every one fault seeming monstrous till his fellow-fault came to match it.
As You Like It. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Neither rhyme nor reason.
As You Like It. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I would the gods had made thee poetical.
As You Like It. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Down on your knees,
And thank Heaven, fasting, for a good man’s love.
As You Like It. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
It is a melancholy of mine own, compounded of many simples, extracted from many objects, and indeed the sundry contemplation of my travels, in which my often rumination wraps me in a most humorous sadness.
As You Like It. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have gained my experience.
As You Like It. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I had rather have a fool to make me merry than experience to make me sad.
As You Like It. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I will scarce think you have swam in a gondola.
As You Like It. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I ’ll warrant him heart-whole.
As You Like It. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Good orators, when they are out, they will spit.
As You Like It. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Men have died from time to time, and worms have eaten them,—but not for love.
As You Like It. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Can one desire too much of a good thing?
As You Like It. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
For ever and a day.
As You Like It. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Men are April when they woo, December when they wed: maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives.
As You Like It. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The horn, the horn, the lusty horn
Is not a thing to laugh to scorn.
As You Like It. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Chewing the food
As You Like It. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
It is meat and drink to me.
As You Like It. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
“So so” is good, very good, very excellent good; and yet it is not; it is but so so.
As You Like It. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.
As You Like It. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I will kill thee a hundred and fifty ways.
As You Like It. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
No sooner met but they looked; no sooner looked but they loved; no sooner loved but they sighed; no sooner sighed but they asked one another the reason; no sooner knew the reason but they sought the remedy.
As You Like It. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
How bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man’s eyes!
As You Like It. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Here comes a pair of very strange beasts, which in all tongues are called fools.
As You Like It. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
An ill-favoured thing, sir, but mine own.
As You Like It. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Rich honesty dwells like a miser, sir, in a poor house; as your pearl in your foul oyster.
As You Like It. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
The Retort Courteous;… the Quip Modest;… the Reply Churlish;… the Reproof Valiant;… the Countercheck Quarrelsome;… the Lie with Circumstance;… the Lie Direct.
As You Like It. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Your If is the only peacemaker; much virtue in If.
As You Like It. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Good wine needs no bush.
As You Like It. Epilogue.

Author: William Shakespeare
What a case am I in.
As You Like It. Epilogue.

Author: William Shakespeare
Look in the chronicles; we came in with Richard Conqueror.
The Taming of the Shrew. Induc. Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let the world slide.
The Taming of the Shrew. Induc. Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I ’ll not budge an inch.
The Taming of the Shrew. Induc. Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
As Stephen Sly and old John Naps of Greece,
And Peter Turph and Henry Pimpernell,
And twenty more such names and men as these
Which never were, nor no man ever saw.
The Taming of the Shrew. Induc. Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
No profit grows where is no pleasure ta’en;
In brief, sir, study what you most affect.
The Taming of the Shrew. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
There ’s small choice in rotten apples.
The Taming of the Shrew. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Nothing comes amiss; so money comes withal.
The Taming of the Shrew. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Tush! tush! fear boys with bugs.
The Taming of the Shrew. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
And do as adversaries do in law,—
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
The Taming of the Shrew. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Who wooed in haste, and means to wed at leisure.
The Taming of the Shrew. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
And thereby hangs a tale.
The Taming of the Shrew. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
My cake is dough.
The Taming of the Shrew. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A woman moved is like a fountain troubled,—
Muddy, ill-seeming, thick, bereft of beauty.
The Taming of the Shrew. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Such duty as the subject owes the prince,
Even such a woman oweth to her husband.
The Taming of the Shrew. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T were all one
That I should love a bright particular star,
And think to wed it.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The hind that would be mated by the lion
Must die for love.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie,
Which we ascribe to Heaven.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Service is no heritage.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
He must needs go that the devil drives.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
My friends were poor but honest.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Oft expectation fails, and most oft there
Where most it promises.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I will show myself highly fed and lowly taught.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
From lowest place when virtuous things proceed,
The place is dignified by the doer’s deed.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
They say miracles are past.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
All the learned and authentic fellows.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
A young man married is a man that ’s marr’d.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Make the coming hour o’erflow with joy,
And pleasure drown the brim.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
No legacy is so rich as honesty.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Whose words all ears took captive.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Praising what is lost
Makes the remembrance dear.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The inaudible and noiseless foot of Time.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
All impediments in fancy’s course
Are motives of more fancy.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The bitter past, more welcome is the sweet.
All ’s Well that Ends Well. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
If music be the food of love, play on;
Give me excess of it, that, surfeiting,
The appetite may sicken, and so die.
That strain again! it had a dying fall:
O, it came o’er my ear like the sweet sound
Twelfth Night. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am sure care ’s an enemy to life.
Twelfth Night. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
At my fingers’ ends.
Twelfth Night. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Wherefore are these things hid?
Twelfth Night. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Is it a world to hide virtues in?
Twelfth Night. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
One draught above heat makes him a fool; the second mads him; and a third drowns him.
Twelfth Night. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
We will draw the curtain and show you the picture.
Twelfth Night. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is beauty truly blent, whose red and white
Nature’s own sweet and cunning hand laid on:
Lady, you are the cruell’st she alive
If you will lead these graces to the grave
And leave the world no copy.
Twelfth Night. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Halloo your name to the reverberate hills,
And make the babbling gossip of the air
Cry out.
Twelfth Night. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Journeys end in lovers meeting,
Every wise man’s son doth know.
Twelfth Night. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Then come kiss me, sweet and twenty.
Twelfth Night. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
He does it with a better grace, but I do it more natural.
Twelfth Night. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Is there no respect of place, persons, nor time in you?
Twelfth Night. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Sir To. Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?
Clo. Yes, by Saint Anne, and ginger shall be hot i’ the mouth too.
Twelfth Night. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
My purpose is, indeed, a horse of that colour.
Twelfth Night. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
These most brisk and giddy-paced times.
Twelfth Night. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let still the woman take
An elder than herself: so wears she to him,
So sways she level in her husband’s heart:
For, boy, however we do praise ourselves,
Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm,
More longing, wavering, sooner lost and wo
Twelfth Night. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Then let thy love be younger than thyself,
Or thy affection cannot hold the bent.
Twelfth Night. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
The spinsters and the knitters in the sun
And the free maids that weave their thread with bones
Do use to chant it: it is silly sooth,
And dallies with the innocence of love,
Like the old age.
Twelfth Night. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Duke. And what ’s her history?
Vio. A blank, my lord. She never told her love,
But let concealment, like a worm i’ the bud,
Feed on her damask cheek: she pined in thought,
And with a green and yellow melancholy
She s
Twelfth Night. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am all the daughters of my father’s house,
And all the brothers too.
Twelfth Night. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
An you had any eye behind you, you might see more detraction at your heels than fortunes before you.
Twelfth Night. ACT II Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon ’em.
Twelfth Night. ACT II Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Foolery, sir, does walk about the orb like the sun; it shines everywhere.
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Oh, what a deal of scorn looks beautiful
In the contempt and anger of his lip!
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Love sought is good, but given unsought is better.
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let there be gall enough in thy ink; though thou write with a goose-pen, no matter.
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I think we do know the sweet Roman hand.
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Put thyself into the trick of singularity.
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is not for gravity to play at cherry-pit with Satan.
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
This is very midsummer madness.
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
What, man! defy the Devil: consider, he is an enemy to mankind.
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
If this were played upon a stage now, I could condemn it as an improbable fiction.
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
More matter for a May morning.
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Still you keep o’ the windy side of the law.
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
An I thought he had been valiant and so cunning in fence, I ’ld have seen him damned ere I’ ld have challenged him.
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Out of my lean and low ability
I ’ll lend you something.
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Out of the jaws of death.
Twelfth Night. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
As the old hermit of Prague, that never saw pen and ink, very wittily said to a niece of King Gorboduc, That that is, is.
Twelfth Night. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Clo. What is the opinion of Pythagoras concerning wild fowl?
Mal. That the soul of our grandam might haply inhabit a bird.
Twelfth Night. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thus the whirligig of time brings in his revenges.
Twelfth Night. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
For the rain it raineth every day.
Twelfth Night. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
They say we are
Almost as like as eggs.
The Winter’s Tale. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
What ’s gone and what ’s past help
Should be past grief.
The Winter’s Tale. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A snapper-up of unconsidered trifles.
The Winter’s Tale. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
A merry heart goes all the day,
Your sad tires in a mile-a.
The Winter’s Tale. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
O Proserpina,
For the flowers now, that frighted thou let’st fall
From Dis’s waggon! daffodils,
That come before the swallow dares, and take
The winds of March with beauty; violets dim,
But sweeter than the lids of Juno’s eye
The Winter’s Tale. ACT IV Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
When you do dance, I wish you
A wave o’ the sea,
The Winter’s Tale. ACT IV Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I love a ballad in print o’ life, for then we are sure they are true.
The Winter’s Tale. ACT IV Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
To unpathed waters, undreamed shores.
The Winter’s Tale. ACT IV Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Lord of thy presence and no land beside.
King John. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
And if his name be George, I ’ll call him Peter;
For new-made honour doth forget men’s names.
King John. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
For he is but a bastard to the time
That doth not smack of observation.
King John. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Sweet, sweet, sweet poison for the age’s tooth.
King John. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
For courage mounteth with occasion.
King John. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I would that I were low laid in my grave:
I am not worth this coil that ’s made for me.
King John. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Saint George, that swinged the dragon, and e’er since
Sits on his horse back at mine hostess’ door.
King John. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
He is the half part of a blessed man,
Left to be finished by such as she;
And she a fair divided excellence,
Whose fulness of perfection lies in him.
King John. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Talks as familiarly of roaring lions
As maids of thirteen do of puppy-dogs!
King John. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Zounds! I was never so bethump’d with words
Since I first call’d my brother’s father dad.
King John. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I will instruct my sorrows to be proud;
For grief is proud, and makes his owner stoop.
King John. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Here I and sorrows sit;
Here is my throne, bid kings come bow to it.
King John. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thou slave, thou wretch, thou coward!
Thou little valiant, great in villany!
Thou ever strong upon the stronger side!
Thou Fortune’s champion that dost never fight
But when her humorous ladyship is by
To teach thee safety.
King John. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thou wear a lion’s hide! doff it for shame,
And hang a calf’s-skin on those recreant limbs.
King John. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
That no Italian priest
Shall tithe or toll in our dominions.
King John. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Grief fills the room up of my absent child,
Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me,
Puts on his pretty looks, repeats his words,
Remembers me of all his gracious parts,
Stuffs out his vacant garments with his form.
King John. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Life is as tedious as a twice-told tale
Vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man.
King John. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
When Fortune means to men most good,
She looks upon them with a threatening eye.
King John. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
And he that stands upon a slippery place
Makes nice of no vile hold to stay him up.
King John. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
How now, foolish rheum!
King John. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
To gild refined gold, to paint the lily,
To throw a perfume on the violet,
To smooth the ice, or add another hue
Unto the rainbow, or with taper-light
To seek the beauteous eye of heaven to garnish,
Is wasteful and ridiculous excess.
King John. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
And oftentimes excusing of a fault
Doth make the fault the worse by the excuse.
King John. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
We cannot hold mortality’s strong hand.
King John. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Make haste; the better foot before.
King John. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I saw a smith stand with his hammer, thus,
The whilst his iron did on the anvil cool,
With open mouth swallowing a tailor’s news.
King John. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Another lean unwashed artificer.
King John. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
How oft the sight of means to do ill deeds
Make deeds ill done!
King John. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Mocking the air with colours idly spread.
King John. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is strange that death should sing.
I am the cygnet to this pale faint swan,
Who chants a doleful hymn to his own death,
King John. ACT V Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Now my soul hath elbow-room.
King John. ACT V Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
This England never did, nor never shall,
Lie at the proud foot of a conqueror.
King John. ACT V Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Come the three corners of the world in arms,
And we shall shock them. Nought shall make us rue,
If England to itself do rest but true.
King John. ACT V Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Old John of Gaunt, time-honoured Lancaster.
King Richard II. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
In rage deaf as the sea, hasty as fire.
King Richard II. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The daintiest last, to make the end most sweet.
King Richard II. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Truth hath a quiet breast.
King Richard II. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
All places that the eye of heaven visits
Are to a wise man ports and happy havens.
King Richard II. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, who can hold a fire in his hand
By thinking on the frosty Caucasus?
Or cloy the hungry edge of appetite
By bare imagination of a feast?
Or wallow naked in December snow
By thinking on fantastic summer’s heat?
O, no! the apprehens
King Richard II. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The tongues of dying men
Enforce attention like deep harmony.
King Richard II. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The setting sun, and music at the close,
As the last taste of sweets, is sweetest last,
Writ in remembrance more than things long past.
King Richard II. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
This royal throne of kings, this sceptred isle,
This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars,
This other Eden, demi-paradise,
This fortress built by Nature for herself
Against infection and the hand of war,
This happy breed of men, this little
King Richard II. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The ripest fruit first falls.
King Richard II. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Evermore thanks, the exchequer of the poor.
King Richard II. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Eating the bitter bread of banishment.
King Richard II. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Fires the proud tops of the eastern pines.
King Richard II. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Not all the water in the rough rude sea
Can wash the balm off from an anointed king.
King Richard II. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, call back yesterday, bid time return!
King Richard II. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let ’s talk of graves, of worms, and epitaphs.
King Richard II. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
And nothing can we call our own but death
And that small model of the barren earth
Which serves as paste and cover to our bones.
For God’s sake, let us sit upon the ground
And tell sad stories of the death of kings.
King Richard II. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Comes at the last, and with a little pin
Bores through his castle wall—and farewell king!
King Richard II. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
He is come to open
The purple testament of bleeding war.
King Richard II. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
And my large kingdom for a little grave,
A little little grave, an obscure grave.
King Richard II. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Gave
His body to that pleasant country’s earth,
And his pure soul unto his captain Christ,
Under whose colours he had fought so long.
King Richard II. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A mockery king of snow.
King Richard II. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
As in a theatre, the eyes of men,
After a well-graced actor leaves the stage,
Are idly bent on him that enters next,
Thinking his prattle to be tedious.
King Richard II. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
As for a camel
To thread the postern of a small needle’s eye.
King Richard II. ACT V Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
So shaken as we are, so wan with care.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
In those holy fields
Over whose acres walked those blessed feet
Which fourteen hundred years ago were nail’d
For our advantage on the bitter cross.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Diana’s foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the moon.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Old father antic the law.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I would to God thou and I knew where a commodity of good names were to be bought.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thou hast damnable iteration, and art indeed able to corrupt a saint.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
And now am I, if a man should speak truly, little better than one of the wicked.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is my vocation, Hal; ’t is no sin for a man to labour in his vocation.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
He will give the devil his due.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
There ’s neither honesty, manhood, nor good fellowship in thee.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
If all the year were playing holidays,
To sport would be as tedious as to work.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Fresh as a bridegroom; and his chin new reap’d
Showed like a stubble-land at harvest-home;
He was perfumed like a milliner,
And ’twixt his finger and his thumb he held
A pouncet-box, which ever and anon
He gave his nose and took &
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
And as the soldiers bore dead bodies by,
He called them untaught knaves, unmannerly,
To bring a slovenly unhandsome corse
Betwixt the wind and his nobility.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
God save the mark.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
And telling me, the sovereign’st thing on earth
Was parmaceti for an inward bruise;
And that it was great pity, so it was,
This villanous saltpetre should be digg’d
Out of the bowels of the harmless earth,
Which many a good tall f
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The blood more stirs
To rouse a lion than to start a hare!
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap
To pluck bright honour from the pale-faced moon,
Or dive into the bottom of the deep,
Where fathom-line could never touch the ground,
And pluck up drowned honour by the locks.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I know a trick worth two of that.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
If the rascal have not given me medicines to make me love him, I ’ll be hanged.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
It would be argument for a week, laughter for a month, and a good jest for ever.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Falstaff sweats to death,
And lards the lean earth as he walks along.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Brain him with his lady’s fan.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
A Corinthian, a lad of mettle, a good boy.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
A plague of all cowards, I say.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
There live not three good men unhanged in England; and one of them is fat and grows old.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Call you that backing of your friends? A plague upon such backing!
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am a Jew else, an Ebrew Jew.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have peppered two of them: two I am sure I have paid, two rogues in buckram suits. I tell thee what, Hal, if I tell thee a lie, spit in my face; call me horse. Thou knowest my old ward: here I lay, and thus I bore my point. Four rogues in buckram let dr
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Three misbegotten knaves in Kendal green.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Give you a reason on compulsion! If reasons were as plentiful as blackberries, I would give no man a reason upon compulsion, I.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Mark now, how a plain tale shall put you down.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I was now a coward on instinct.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
No more of that, Hal, an thou lovest me!
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
What doth gravity out of his bed at midnight?
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
A plague of sighing and grief! It blows a man up like a bladder.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
In King Cambyses’ vein.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
That reverend vice, that grey iniquity, that father ruffian, that vanity in years.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Banish plump Jack, and banish all the world.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Play out the play.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, monstrous! but one half-pennyworth of bread to this intolerable deal of sack!
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Diseased Nature oftentimes breaks forth
In strange eruptions.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am not in the roll of common men.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Glen. I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
Hot. Why, so can I, or so can any man;
But will they come when you do call for them?
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
While you live, tell truth and shame the devil!
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I had rather be a kitten and cry mew
Than one of these same metre ballad-mongers.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
But in the way of bargain, mark ye me,
I ’ll cavil on the ninth part of a hair.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A deal of skimble-skamble stuff.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Exceedingly well read.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A good mouth-filling oath.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A fellow of no mark nor likelihood.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
To loathe the taste of sweetness, whereof a little
More than a little is by much too much.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
An I have not forgotten what the inside of a church is made of, I am a pepper-corn.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Company, villanous company, hath been the spoil of me.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Shall I not take mine ease in mine inn?
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Rob me the exchequer.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
This sickness doth infect
The very life-blood of our enterprise.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
That daffed the world aside,
And bid it pass.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
All plumed like estridges that with the wind
Baited like eagles having lately bathed;
Glittering in golden coats, like images;
As full of spirit as the month of May,
And gorgeous as the sun at midsummer.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I saw young Harry, with his beaver on,
His cuisses on his thighs, gallantly arm’d,
Rise from the ground like feather’d Mercury,
And vaulted with such ease into his seat
As if an angel dropp’d down from the clouds,
To turn and
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The cankers of a calm world and a long peace.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A mad fellow met me on the way and told me I had unloaded all the gibbets and pressed the dead bodies. No eye hath seen such scarecrows. I ’ll not march through Coventry with them, that ’s flat: nay, and the villains march wide betwixt the legs,
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Food for powder, food for powder; they ’ll fill a pit as well as better.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
To the latter end of a fray and the beginning of a feast
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I would ’t were bedtime, Hal, and all well.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Honour pricks me on. Yea, but how if honour prick me off when I come on,—how then? Can honour set to a leg? no: or an arm? no: or take away the grief of a wound? no. Honour hath no skill in surgery, then? no. What is honour? a word. What is in that w
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Two stars keep not their motion in one sphere.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
This earth that bears thee dead
Bears not alive so stout a gentleman.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thy ignominy sleep with thee in the grave,
But not remember’d in thy epitaph!
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I could have better spared a better man.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
The better part of valour is discretion.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Full bravely hast thou fleshed
Thy maiden sword.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Lord, Lord, how this world is given to lying! I grant you I was down and out of breath; and so was he. But we rose both at an instant, and fought a long hour by Shrewsbury clock.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I ’ll purge, and leave sack, and live cleanly.
King Henry IV. Part I. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Even such a man, so faint, so spiritless,
So dull, so dead in look, so woe-begone,
Drew Priam’s curtain in the dead of night,
And would have told him half his Troy was burnt.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Yet the first bringer of unwelcome news
Hath but a losing office, and his tongue
Sounds ever after as a sullen bell,
Remember’d tolling a departing friend.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am not only witty in myself, but the cause that wit is in other men.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A rascally yea-forsooth knave.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Some smack of age in you, some relish of the saltness of time.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
We that are in the vaward of our youth.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
For my voice, I have lost it with halloing and singing of anthems.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
It was alway yet the trick of our English nation, if they have a good thing to make it too common.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I were better to be eaten to death with a rust than to be scoured to nothing with perpetual motion.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
If I do, fillip me with a three-man beetle.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Who lined himself with hope,
Eating the air on promise of supply.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
When we mean to build,
We first survey the plot, then draw the model;
And when we see the figure of the house,
Then must we rate the cost of the erection.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
An habitation giddy and unsure
Hath he that buildeth on the vulgar heart.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Past and to come seems best; things present worst.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
A poor lone woman.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I ’ll tickle your catastrophe.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
He hath eaten me out of house and home.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thou didst swear to me upon a parcel-gilt goblet, sitting in my Dolphin-chamber, at the round table, by a sea-coal fire, upon Wednesday in Wheeson week.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I do now remember the poor creature, small beer.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let the end try the man.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thus we play the fools with the time, and the spirits of the wise sit in the clouds and mock us.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
He was indeed the glass
Wherein the noble youth did dress themselves.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Aggravate your choler.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
O sleep, O gentle sleep,
Nature’s soft nurse! how have I frighted thee,
That thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down
And steep my senses in forgetfulness?
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
With all appliances and means to boot.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Death, as the Psalmist saith, is certain to all; all shall die. How a good yoke of bullocks at Stamford fair?
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Accommodated; that is, when a man is, as they say, accommodated; or when a man is, being, whereby a’ may be thought to be accommodated,—which is an excellent thing.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Most forcible Feeble.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
We have heard the chimes at midnight.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A man can die but once.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Like a man made after supper of a cheese-paring: when a’ was naked, he was, for all the world, like a forked radish, with a head fantastically carved upon it with a knife.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
We are ready to try our fortunes
To the last man.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I may justly say, with the hook-nosed fellow of Rome, “I came, saw, and overcame.”
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
He hath a tear for pity, and a hand
Open as day for melting charity.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT IV Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thy wish was father, Harry, to that thought.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT IV Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Commit
The oldest sins the newest kind of ways.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT IV Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
A joint of mutton, and any pretty little tiny kick-shaws, tell William cook.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
His cares are now all ended.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Falstaff. What wind blew you hither, Pistol?
Pistol. Not the ill wind which blows no man to good.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
A foutre for the world and worldlings base!
I speak of Africa and golden joys.
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Under which king, Bezonian? speak, or die!
King Henry IV. Part II. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
O for a Muse of fire, that would ascend
The brightest heaven of invention!
King Henry V. Prologue.

Author: William Shakespeare
Consideration, like an angel, came
And whipped the offending Adam out of him.
King Henry V. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Turn him to any cause of policy,
The Gordian knot of it he will unloose,
Familiar as his garter: that when he speaks,
The air, a chartered libertine, is still.
King Henry V. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Base is the slave that pays.
King Henry V. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Even at the turning o’ the tide.
King Henry V. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
His nose was as sharp as a pen, and a’ babbled of green fields.
King Henry V. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
As cold as any stone.
King Henry V. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Self-love, my liege, is not so vile a sin
As self-neglecting.
King Henry V. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more,
Or close the wall up with our English dead!
In peace there ’s nothing so becomes a man
As modest stillness and humility;
But when the blast of war blows in our ears,
Then imitate the
King Henry V. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
And sheathed their swords for lack of argument.
King Henry V. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,
Straining upon the start.
King Henry V. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I would give all my fame for a pot of ale and safety.
King Henry V. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Men of few words are the best men.
King Henry V. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I thought upon one pair of English legs
Did march three Frenchmen.
King Henry V. ACT III Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
You may as well say, that ’s a valiant flea that dare eat his breakfast on the lip of a lion.
King Henry V. ACT III Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
The hum of either army stilly sounds,
That the fixed sentinels almost receive
The secret whispers of each other’s watch;
Fire answers fire, and through their paly flames
Each battle sees the other’s umbered face;
Steed threatens s
King Henry V. ACT IV Prologue.

Author: William Shakespeare
There is some soul of goodness in things evil,
Would men observingly distil it out.
King Henry V. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Every subject’s duty is the king’s; but every subject’s soul is his own.
King Henry V. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
That ’s a perilous shot out of an elder-gun.
King Henry V. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Who with a body filled and vacant mind
Gets him to rest, crammed with distressful bread.
King Henry V. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Winding up days with toil and nights with sleep.
King Henry V. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
But if it be a sin to covet honour,
I am the most offending soul alive.
King Henry V. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
This day is called the feast of Crispian:
He that outlives this day and comes safe home,
Will stand a tip-toe when this day is named,
And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
King Henry V. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Then shall our names,
Familiar in his mouth
King Henry V. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers.
King Henry V. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
There is a river in Macedon; and there is also moreover a river at Monmouth;… and there is salmons in both.
King Henry V. ACT IV Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
An arrant traitor as any is in the universal world, or in France, or in England!
King Henry V. ACT IV Scene 8.

Author: William Shakespeare
There is occasions and causes why and wherefore in all things.
King Henry V. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
By this leek, I will most horribly revenge: I eat and eat, I swear.
King Henry V. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
All hell shall stir for this.
King Henry V. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
If he be not fellow with the best king, thou shalt find the best king of good fellows.
King Henry V. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Hung be the heavens with black, yield day to night!
King Henry VI. Part I. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Halcyon days.
King Henry VI. Part I. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Between two hawks, which flies the higher pitch;
Between two dogs, which hath the deeper mouth;
Between two blades, which bears the better temper;
Between two horses, which doth bear him best;
Between two girls, which hath the merriest eye,
King Henry VI. Part I. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Delays have dangerous ends.
King Henry VI. Part I. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
She ’s beautiful, and therefore to be wooed;
She is a woman, therefore to be won.
King Henry VI. Part I. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Main chance.
King Henry VI. Part II. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Could I come near your beauty with my nails,
I ’d set my ten commandments in your face.
King Henry VI. Part II. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Smooth runs the water where the brook is deep.
King Henry VI. Part II. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
What stronger breastplate than a heart untainted!
Thrice is he armed that hath his quarrel just,
And he but naked, though locked up in steel,
Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted.
King Henry VI. Part II. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
He dies, and makes no sign.
King Henry VI. Part II. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Close up his eyes and draw the curtain close;
And let us all to meditation.
King Henry VI. Part II. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The gaudy, blabbing, and remorseful day
Is crept into the bosom of the sea.
King Henry VI. Part II. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
There shall be in England seven halfpenny loaves sold for a penny; the three-hooped pot shall have ten hoops; and I will make it felony to drink small beer.
King Henry VI. Part II. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Is not this a lamentable thing, that of the skin of an innocent lamb should be made parchment? that parchment, being scribbled o’er, should undo a man?
King Henry VI. Part II. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Sir, he made a chimney in my father’s house, and the bricks are alive at this day to testify it.
King Henry VI. Part II. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thou hast most traitorously corrupted the youth of the realm in erecting a grammar-school; and whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used, and, contrary to the king, his crown and
King Henry VI. Part II. ACT IV Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
How sweet a thing it is to wear a crown,
Within whose circuit is Elysium
And all that poets feign of bliss and joy!
King Henry VI. Part III. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
And many strokes, though with a little axe,
Hew down and fell the hardest-timbered oak.
King Henry VI. Part III. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The smallest worm will turn, being trodden on.
King Henry VI. Part III. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Didst thou never hear
That things ill got had ever bad success?
And happy always was it for that son
Whose father for his hoarding went to hell?
King Henry VI. Part III. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Warwick, peace,
Proud setter up and puller down of kings!
King Henry VI. Part III. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
A little fire is quickly trodden out;
Which, being suffered, rivers cannot quench.
King Henry VI. Part III. ACT IV Scene 8.

Author: William Shakespeare
Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind;
The thief doth fear each bush an officer.
King Henry VI. Part III. ACT V Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this sun of York,
And all the clouds that loured upon our house
In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.
Now are our brows bound with victorious wreaths,
Our bruised arms hung up for
King Richard III. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
To leave this keen encounter of our wits.
King Richard III. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Was ever woman in this humour wooed?
Was ever woman in this humour won?
King Richard III. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Framed in the prodigality of nature.
King Richard III. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The world is grown so bad,
That wrens make prey where eagles dare not perch.
King Richard III. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
And thus I clothe my naked villany
With old odd ends stolen out of
King Richard III. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, I have passed a miserable night,
So full of ugly sights, of ghastly dreams,
That, as I am a Christian faithful man,
I would not spend another such a night,
Though ’t were to buy a world of happy days.
King Richard III. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Lord, Lord! methought, what pain it was to drown!
What dreadful noise of waters in mine ears!
What ugly sights of death within mine eyes!
Methought I saw a thousand fearful wrecks,
Ten thousand men that fishes gnawed upon,
Wedges of gold, g
King Richard III. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
A parlous boy.
King Richard III. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
So wise so young, they say, do never live long.
King Richard III. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Off with his head!
King Richard III. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Lives like a drunken sailor on a mast,
Ready with every nod to tumble down.
King Richard III. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Even in the afternoon of her best days.
King Richard III. ACT III Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thou troublest me; I am not in the vein.
King Richard III. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Their lips were four red roses on a stalk.
King Richard III. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The sons of Edward sleep in Abraham’s bosom.
King Richard III. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let not the heavens hear these tell-tale women
Rail on the Lord’s anointed.
King Richard III. ACT IV Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Tetchy and wayward.
King Richard III. ACT IV Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
An honest tale speeds best, being plainly told.
King Richard III. ACT IV Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thus far into the bowels of the land
Have we marched on without impediment.
King Richard III. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
True hope is swift, and flies with swallow’s wings;
Kings it makes gods, and meaner creatures kings.
King Richard III. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The king’s name is a tower of strength.
King Richard III. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Give me another horse: bind up my wounds.
King Richard III. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
O coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me!
King Richard III. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
My conscience hath a thousand several tongues,
And every tongue brings in a several tale,
And every tale condemns me for a villain.
King Richard III. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The early village cock
Hath twice done salutation to the morn.
King Richard III. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
By the apostle Paul, shadows to-night
Have struck more terror to the soul of Richard
Than can the substance of ten thousand soldiers.
King Richard III. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The selfsame heaven
That frowns on me looks sadly upon him.
King Richard III. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
A thing devised by the enemy.
King Richard III. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have set my life upon a cast,
And I will stand the hazard of the die:
I think there be six Richmonds in the field.
King Richard III. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse!
King Richard III. ACT V Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Order gave each thing view.
King Henry VIII. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
No man’s pie is freed
From his ambitious finger.
King Henry VIII. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Anger is like
A full-hot horse, who being allow’d his way,
Self-mettle tires him.
King Henry VIII. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot
That it do singe yourself.
King Henry VIII. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is but the fate of place, and the rough brake
That virtue must go through.
King Henry VIII. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The mirror of all courtesy.
King Henry VIII. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
This bold bad man.
King Henry VIII. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is better to be lowly born,
And range with humble livers in content,
Than to be perked up in a glistering grief,
And wear a golden sorrow.
King Henry VIII. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Orpheus with his lute made trees,
And the mountain-tops that freeze,
Bow themselves when he did sing.
King Henry VIII. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is well said again,
And ’t is a kind of good deed to say well:
And yet words are no deeds.
King Henry VIII. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
And then to breakfast with
What appetite you have.
King Henry VIII. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have touched the highest point of all my greatness;
And from that full meridian of my glory
I haste now to my setting: I shall fall
Like a bright exhalation in the evening,
And no man see me more.
King Henry VIII. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Press not a falling man too far!
King Henry VIII. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Farewell! a long farewell, to all my greatness!
This is the state of man: to-day he puts forth
The tender leaves of hopes; to-morrow blossoms,
And bears his blushing honours thick upon him;
The third day comes a frost, a killing frost,
And
King Henry VIII. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A peace above all earthly dignities,
A still and quiet conscience.
King Henry VIII. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A load would sink a navy.
King Henry VIII. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
And sleep in dull cold marble.
King Henry VIII. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Say, Wolsey, that once trod the ways of glory,
And sounded all the depths and shoals of honour,
Found thee a way, out of his wreck, to rise in;
A sure and safe one, though thy master missed it.
King Henry VIII. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I charge thee, fling away ambition:
By that sin fell the angels.
King Henry VIII. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Love thyself last: cherish those hearts that hate thee;
Corruption wins not more than honesty.
Still in thy right hand carry gentle peace,
To silence envious tongues. Be just, and fear not:
Let all the ends thou aim’st at be thy country&#
King Henry VIII. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Had I but served my God with half the zeal
I served my king, he would not in mine age
Have left me naked to mine enemies.
King Henry VIII. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A royal train, believe me.
King Henry VIII. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
An old man, broken with the storms of state,
Is come to lay his weary bones among ye:
Give him a little earth for charity!
King Henry VIII. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
He gave his honours to the world again,
His blessed part to heaven, and slept in peace.
King Henry VIII. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
So may he rest; his faults lie gently on him!
King Henry VIII. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
He was a man
Of an unbounded stomach.
King Henry VIII. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Men’s evil manners live in brass; their virtues
We write in water.
King Henry VIII. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
He was a scholar, and a ripe and good one;
Exceeding wise, fair-spoken, and persuading;
Lofty and sour to them that loved him not,
But to those men that sought him sweet as summer.
King Henry VIII. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Yet in bestowing, madam,
He was most princely.
King Henry VIII. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
After my death I wish no other herald,
No other speaker of my living actions,
To keep mine honour from corruption,
But such an honest chronicler as Griffith.
King Henry VIII. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
To dance attendance on their lordships’ pleasures.
King Henry VIII. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is a cruelty
To load a falling man.
King Henry VIII. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
You were ever good at sudden commendations.
King Henry VIII. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I come not
To hear such flattery now, and in my presence.
King Henry VIII. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
They are too thin and bare to hide offences.
King Henry VIII. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Those about her
From her shall read the perfect ways of honour.
King Henry VIII. ACT V Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Wherever the bright sun of heaven shall shine,
His honour and the greatness of his name
Shall be, and make new nations.
King Henry VIII. ACT V Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
A most unspotted lily shall she pass
To the ground, and all the world shall mourn her.
King Henry VIII. ACT V Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have had my labour for my travail.
Troilus and Cressida. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Take but degree away, untune that string,
And, hark, what discord follows! each thing meets
In mere oppugnancy.
Troilus and Cressida. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The baby figure of the giant mass
Of things to come.
Troilus and Cressida. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Modest doubt is call’d
The beacon of the wise, the tent that searches
To the bottom of the worst.
Troilus and Cressida. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The common curse of mankind,—folly and ignorance.
Troilus and Cressida. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
All lovers swear more performance than they are able, and yet reserve an ability that they never perform; vowing more than the perfection of ten, and discharging less than the tenth part of one.
Troilus and Cressida. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Welcome ever smiles,
And farewell goes out sighing.
Troilus and Cressida. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.
Troilus and Cressida. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
And give to dust that is a little gilt
More laud than gilt o’er-dusted.
Troilus and Cressida. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
And like a dew-drop from the lion’s mane,
Be shook to air.
Troilus and Cressida. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
His heart and hand both open and both free;
For what he has he gives, what thinks he shows;
Yet gives he not till judgment guide his bounty.
Troilus and Cressida. ACT IV Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
The end crowns all,
And that old common arbitrator, Time,
Will one day end it.
Troilus and Cressida. ACT IV Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Had I a dozen sons, each in my love alike and none less dear than thine and my good Marcius, I had rather eleven die nobly for their country than one voluptuously surfeit out of action.
Coriolanus. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Nature teaches beasts to know their friends.
Coriolanus. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A cup of hot wine with not a drop of allaying Tiber in ’t.
Coriolanus. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Many-headed multitude.
Coriolanus. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I thank you for your voices: thank you:
Your most sweet voices.
Coriolanus. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Hear you this Triton of the minnows? Mark you
His absolute “shall”?
Coriolanus. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Enough, with over-measure.
Coriolanus. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
His nature is too noble for the world:
He would not flatter Neptune for his trident,
Or Jove for ’s power to thunder.
Coriolanus. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
That it shall hold companionship in peace
With honour, as in war.
Coriolanus. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Serv. Where dwellest thou?
Cor. Under the canopy.
Coriolanus. ACT IV Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
A name unmusical to the Volscians’ ears,
And harsh in sound to thine.
Coriolanus. ACT IV Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Chaste as the icicle
That ’s curdied by the frost from purest snow
And hangs on Dian’s temple.
Coriolanus. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
If you have writ your annals true, ’t is there
That, like an eagle in a dove-cote, I
Flutter’d your Volscians in Corioli:
Alone I did it. Boy!
Coriolanus. ACT V Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
Sweet mercy is nobility’s true badge.
Titus Andronicus. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
She is a woman, therefore may be woo’d;
She is a woman, therefore may be won;
She is Lavinia, therefore must be loved.
What, man! more water glideth by the mill
Than wots the miller of;
Titus Andronicus. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The eagle suffers little birds to sing.
Titus Andronicus. ACT IV Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
The weakest goes to the wall.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Gregory, remember thy swashing blow.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
An hour before the worshipp’d sun
Peered forth the golden window of the east.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
As is the bud bit with an envious worm
Ere he can spread his sweet leaves to the air,
Or dedicate his beauty to the sun.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Saint-seducing gold.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
He that is strucken blind cannot forget
The precious treasure of his eyesight lost.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
One fire burns out another’s burning,
One pain is lessen’d by another’s anguish.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
That book in many’s eyes doth share the glory
That in gold clasps locks in the golden story.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
For I am proverb’d with a grandsire phrase.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, then, I see Queen Mab hath been with you!
She is the fairies’ midwife, and she comes
In shape no bigger than an agate-stone
On the fore-finger of an alderman,
Drawn with a team of little atomies
Athwart men’s noses as they lie
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Made by the joiner squirrel or old grub,
Time out o’ mind the fairies’ coachmakers.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Sometime she driveth o’er a soldier’s neck,
And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats,
Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades,
Of healths five-fathom deep; and then anon
Drums in his ear, at which he starts and wakes,
And be
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
True, I talk of dreams,
Which are the children of an idle brain,
Begot of nothing but vain fantasy.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
For you and I are past our dancing days.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
It seems she hangs
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Shall have the chinks.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
Romeo and Juliet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Young Adam Cupid, he that shot so trim,
When King Cophetua loved the beggar maid!
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
He jests at scars that never felt a wound.
But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
See, how she leans her cheek upon her hand!
O that I were a glove upon that hand,
That I might touch that cheek!
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
What ’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
For stony limits cannot hold love out.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye
Than twenty of their swords.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
At lovers’ perjuries,
They say, Jove laughs.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Rom. Lady, by yonder blessed moon I swear,
That tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops—
Jul. O, swear not by the moon, the inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Lest that thy love prove likewise varia
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The god of my idolatry.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be
Ere one can say, “It lightens.”
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
This bud of love, by summer’s ripening breath,
May prove a beauteous flower when next we meet.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
How silver-sweet sound lovers’ tongues by night,
Like softest music to attending ears!
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Good night, good night! parting is such sweet sorrow,
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, mickle is the powerful grace that lies
In herbs, plants, stones, and their true qualities:
For nought so vile that on the earth doth live
But to the earth some special good doth give,
Nor aught so good but strain’d from that fair use
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Care keeps his watch in every old man’s eye,
And where care lodges, sleep will never lie.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thy old groans ring yet in my ancient ears.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Stabbed with a white wench’s black eye.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
The courageous captain of complements.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
One, two, and the third in your bosom.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
O flesh, flesh, how art thou fishified!
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am the very pink of courtesy.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
A gentleman, nurse, that loves to hear himself talk, and will speak more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
My man ’s as true as steel.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
These violent delights have violent ends.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
Here comes the lady! O, so light a foot
Will ne’er wear out the everlasting flint.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT II Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thy head is as full of quarrels as an egg is full of meat.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A word and a blow.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A plague o’ both your houses!
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Rom. Courage, man; the hurt cannot be much.
Mer. No, ’t is not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church-door; but ’t is enough, ’t will serve.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
When he shall die,
Take him and cut him out in little stars,
And he will make the face of heaven so fine
That all the world will be in love with night,
And pay no worship to the garish sun.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical!
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? O, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace!
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thou cutt’st my head off with a golden axe.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
They may seize
On the white wonder of dear Juliet’s hand
And steal immortal blessing from her lips,
Who, even in pure and vestal modesty,
Still blush, as thinking their own kisses sin.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The damned use that word in hell.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Adversity’s sweet milk, philosophy.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Taking the measure of an unmade grave.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Night’s candles are burnt out, and jocund day
Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain-tops.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Straining harsh discords and unpleasing sharps.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
All these woes shall serve
For sweet discourses in our time to come.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Villain and he be many miles asunder.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thank me no thanks, nor proud me no prouds.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Not stepping o’er the bounds of modesty.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
My bosom’s lord sits lightly in his throne.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I do remember an apothecary,—
And hereabouts he dwells.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Meagre were his looks,
Sharp misery had worn him to the bones.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A beggarly account of empty boxes.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Famine is in thy cheeks.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The world is not thy friend nor the world’s law.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Ap. My poverty, but not my will, consents.
Rom. I pay thy poverty, and not thy will.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The strength
Of twenty men.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
One writ with me in sour misfortune’s book.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Her beauty makes
This vault a feasting presence full of light.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Beauty’s ensign yet
Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
And death’s pale flag is not advanced there.
Romeo and Juliet. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Eyes, look your last!
Arms, take your last embrace!
Romeo and Juliet. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
But flies an eagle flight, bold and forth on,
Leaving no tract behind.
Timon of Athens. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Here ’s that which is too weak to be a sinner,—honest water, which ne’er left man i’ the mire.
Timon of Athens. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Immortal gods, I crave no pelf;
I pray for no man but myself;
Grant I may never prove so fond,
To trust man on his oath or bond.
Timon of Athens. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Men shut their doors against a setting sun.
Timon of Athens. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Every room
Hath blazed with lights and bray’d with minstrelsy.
Timon of Athens. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is lack of kindly warmth.
Timon of Athens. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Every man has his fault, and honesty is his.
Timon of Athens. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Nothing emboldens sin so much as mercy.
Timon of Athens. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
We have seen better days.
Timon of Athens. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Are not within the leaf of pity writ.
Timon of Athens. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I ’ll example you with thievery:
The sun ’s a thief, and with his great attraction
Robs the vast sea; the moon ’s an arrant thief,
And her pale fire she snatches from the sun;
The sea ’s a thief, whose liquid surge resolves
Timon of Athens. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Life’s uncertain voyage.
Timon of Athens. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
As proper men as ever trod upon neat’s leather.
Julius Cæsar. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The live-long day.
Julius Cæsar. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Beware the ides of March.
Julius Cæsar. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Well, honour is the subject of my story.
I cannot tell what you and other men
Think of this life; but, for my single self,
I had as lief not be as live to be
In awe of such a thing as I myself.
Julius Cæsar. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
“Darest thou, Cassius, now
Leap in with me into this angry flood,
And swim to yonder point?” Upon the word,
Accoutred as I was, I plunged in
And bade him follow.
Julius Cæsar. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Help me, Cassius, or I sink!
Julius Cæsar. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Ye gods, it doth amaze me
A man of such a feeble temper should
So get the start of the majestic world
And bear the palm alone.
Julius Cæsar. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a Colossus, and we petty men
Walk under his huge legs and peep about
To find ourselves dishonourable graves.
Men at some time are masters of their fates:
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our
Julius Cæsar. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Conjure with ’em,—
Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Cæsar.
Now, in the names of all the gods at once,
Upon what meat doth this our Cæsar feed,
That he is grown so great? Age, thou art shamed!
Rome, thou hast lost th
Julius Cæsar. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
There was a Brutus once that would have brook’d
The eternal devil to keep his state in Rome
As easily as a king.
Julius Cæsar. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let me have men about me that are fat,
Sleek-headed men, and such as sleep o’ nights:
Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look;
He thinks too much: such men are dangerous.
Julius Cæsar. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
He reads much;
He is a great observer, and he looks
Quite through the deeds of men.
Julius Cæsar. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort
As if he mock’d himself, and scorn’d his spirit
That could be moved to smile at anything.
Julius Cæsar. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
But, for my own part, it was Greek to me.
Julius Cæsar. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is a common proof,
That lowliness is young ambition’s ladder,
Whereto the climber-upward turns his face;
But when he once attains the upmost
Julius Cæsar. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Between the acting of a dreadful thing
And the first motion, all the interim is
Like a phantasma, or a hideous dream:
The Genius and the mortal instruments
Are then in council; and the state of man,
Like to a little kingdom, suffers then
Julius Cæsar. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A dish fit for the gods.
Julius Cæsar. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
But when I tell him he hates flatterers,
He says he does, being then most flattered.
Julius Cæsar. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Boy! Lucius! Fast asleep? It is no matter;
Enjoy the honey-heavy dew of slumber:
Thou hast no figures nor no fantasies,
Which busy care draws in the brains of men;
Therefore thou sleep’st so sound.
Julius Cæsar. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
With an angry wafture of your hand,
Gave sign for me to leave you.
Julius Cæsar. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
You are my true and honourable wife,
As dear to me as are the ruddy drops
Julius Cæsar. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Think you I am no stronger than my sex,
Being so father’d and so husbanded?
Julius Cæsar. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Fierce fiery warriors fought upon the clouds,
In ranks and squadrons and right form of war,
Which drizzled blood upon the Capitol.
Julius Cæsar. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
These things are beyond all use,
And I do fear them.
Julius Cæsar. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
When beggars die, there are no comets seen;
The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes.
Julius Cæsar. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Cowards die many times before their deaths;
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear;
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will co
Julius Cæsar. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Cæs. The ides of March are come.
Sooth. Ay, Cæsar; but not gone.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
But I am constant as the northern star,
Of whose true-fix’d and resting quality
There is no fellow in the firmament.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Et tu, Brute!
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
How many ages hence
Shall this our lofty scene be acted over
In states unborn and accents yet unknown!
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The choice and master spirits of this age.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Though last, not least in love.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth,
That I am meek and gentle with these butchers!
Thou art the ruins of the noblest man
That ever lived in the tide of times.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Cry “Havoc,” and let slip the dogs of war.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause, and be silent that you may hear.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Not that I loved Cæsar less, but that I loved Rome more.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Who is here so base that would be a bondman?
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
If any, speak; for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Cæsar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
For Brutus is an honourable man;
So are they all, all honourable men.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
When that the poor have cried, Cæsar hath wept:
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
O judgment! thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
But yesterday the word of Cæsar might
Have stood against the world; now lies he there,
And none so poor to do him reverence.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
If you have tears, prepare to shed them now.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
See what a rent the envious Casca made.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
This was the most unkindest cut of all.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Great Cæsar fell.
O, what a fall was there, my countrymen!
Then I, and you, and all of us fell down,
Whilst bloody treason flourish’d over us.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
What private griefs they have, alas, I know not.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts:
I am no orator, as Brutus is;
But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I only speak right on.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Put a tongue
In every wound of Cæsar that should move
The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.
Julius Cæsar. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
When love begins to sicken and decay,
It useth an enforced ceremony.
There are no tricks in plain and simple faith.
Julius Cæsar. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
You yourself
Are much condemn’d to have an itching palm.
Julius Cæsar. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The foremost man of all this world.
Julius Cæsar. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I had rather be a dog, and bay the moon,
Than such a Roman.
Julius Cæsar. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I said, an elder soldier, not a better:
Did I say “better”?
Julius Cæsar. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats,
For I am arm’d so strong in honesty
That they pass by me as the idle wind,
Which I respect not.
Julius Cæsar. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Should I have answer’d Caius Cassius so?
When Marcus Brutus grows so covetous,
To lock such rascal counters from his friends,
Be ready, gods, with all your thunderbolts:
Dash him to pieces!
Julius Cæsar. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
A friend should bear his friend’s infirmities,
But Brutus makes mine greater than they are.
Julius Cæsar. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
All his faults observed,
Set in a note-book, learn’d, and conn’d by rote.
Julius Cæsar. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
There is a tide in the affairs of men
Which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
Julius Cæsar. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
We must take the current when it serves,
Or lose our ventures.
Julius Cæsar. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The deep of night is crept upon our talk,
And nature must obey necessity.
Julius Cæsar. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Brutus. Then I shall see thee again?
Ghost. Ay, at Philippi.
Brutus. Why, I will see thee at Philippi, then.
Julius Cæsar. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
But for your words, they rob the Hybla bees,
And leave them honeyless.
Julius Cæsar. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Forever, and forever, farewell, Cassius!
If we do meet again, why, we shall smile;
If not, why then this parting was well made.
Julius Cæsar. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, that a man might know
The end of this day’s business ere it come!
Julius Cæsar. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The last of all the Romans, fare thee well!
Julius Cæsar. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
This was the noblest Roman of them all.
Julius Cæsar. ACT V Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
His life was gentle, and the elements
So mix’d in him, that Nature might stand up
And say to all the world, “This was a man!”
Julius Cæsar. ACT V Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
1 W. When shall we three meet again
In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
2 W. When the hurlyburly ’s done,
When the battle ’s lost and won.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Fair is foul, and foul is fair.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Banners flout the sky.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Sleep shall neither night nor day
Hang upon his pent-house lid.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Dwindle, peak, and pine.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
What are these
So wither’d and so wild in their attire,
That look not like the inhabitants o’ the earth,
And yet are on ’t?
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
If you can look into the seeds of time,
And say which grain will grow and which will not.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Stands not within the prospect of belief.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The earth hath bubbles as the water has,
And these are of them.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The insane root
That takes the reason prisoner.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
And oftentimes, to win us to our harm,
The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
Win us with honest trifles, to betray ’s
In deepest consequence.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Two truths are told,
As happy prologues to the swelling act
Of the imperial theme.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
And make my seated heart knock at my ribs,
Against the use of nature. Present fears
Are less than horrible imaginings.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Nothing is
But what is not.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Come what come may,
Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Nothing in his life
Became him like the leaving it; he died
As one that had been studied in his death
To throw away the dearest thing he owed,
As ’t were a careless trifle.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
There ’s no art
To find the mind’s construction in the face.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
More is thy due than more than all can pay.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Yet do I fear thy nature;
It is too full o’ the milk of human kindness.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
What thou wouldst highly,
That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false,
And yet wouldst wrongly win.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
That no compunctious visitings of nature
Shake my fell purpose.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Your face, my thane, is as a book where men
May read strange matters. To beguile the time,
Look like the time; bear welcome in your eye,
Your hand, your tongue: look like the innocent flower,
But be the serpent under ’t.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Which shall to all our nights and days to come
Give solely sovereign sway and masterdom.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
This castle hath a pleasant seat; the air
Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself
Unto our gentle senses.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
The heaven’s breath
Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
The air is delicate.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
If it were done when ’t is done, then ’t were well
It were done quickly: if the assassination
Could trammel up the consequence, and catch
With his surcease success; that but this blow
Might be the be-all and the end-all here,
But
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Besides, this Duncan
Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
So clear in his great office, that his virtues
Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
The deep damnation of his taking-off;
And pity, like a naked new-born babe,
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have bought
Golden opinions from all sorts of people.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Letting “I dare not” wait upon “I would,”
Like the poor cat i’ the adage.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
I dare do all that may become a man;
Who dares do more is none.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Nor time nor place
Did then adhere.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Macb. If we should fail?
Lady M. We fail!
But screw your courage to the sticking-place,
And we ’ll not fail.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Memory, the warder of the brain.
Macbeth. ACT I Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
There ’s husbandry in heaven;
Their candles are all out.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Shut up
In measureless content.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Is this a dagger which I see before me,
The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee.
I have thee not, and yet I see thee still.
Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible
To feeling as to sight? or art thou but
A dagger of the mind, a fal
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thou marshall’st me the way that I was going.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Now o’er the one half-world
Nature seems dead.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thou sure and firm-set earth,
Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear
Thy very stones prate of my whereabout.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The bell invites me.
Hear it not, Duncan; for it is a knell
That summons thee to heaven or to hell.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
It was the owl that shriek’d, the fatal bellman,
Which gives the stern’st good-night.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The attempt and not the deed
Confounds us.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I had most need of blessing, and “Amen”
Stuck in my throat.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Methought I heard a voice cry, “Sleep no more!
Macbeth does murder sleep!” the innocent sleep,
Sleep that knits up the ravell’d sleave of care,
The death of each day’s life, sore labour’s bath,
Balm of hurt minds, grea
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Infirm of purpose!
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is the eye of childhood
That fears a painted devil.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Will all great Neptune’s ocean wash this blood
Clean from my hand? No, this my hand will rather
The multitudinous seas incarnadine,
Making the green one red.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The labour we delight in physics pain.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Dire combustion and confused events
New hatch’d to the woful time.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Tongue nor heart
Cannot conceive nor name thee!
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Confusion now hath made his masterpiece!
Most sacrilegious murder hath broke ope
The Lord’s anointed temple, and stole thence
The life o’ the building!
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The wine of life is drawn, and the mere lees
Is left this vault to brag of.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Who can be wise, amazed, temperate and furious,
Loyal and neutral, in a moment?
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
There ’s daggers in men’s smiles.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
A falcon, towering in her pride of place,
Was by a mousing owl hawk’d at and kill’d.
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thriftless ambition, that wilt ravin up
Thine own life’s means!
Macbeth. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I must become a borrower of the night
For a dark hour or twain.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let every man be master of his time
Till seven at night.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Upon my head they placed a fruitless crown,
And put a barren sceptre in my gripe,
Thence to be wrench’d with an unlineal hand,
No son of mine succeeding.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Mur. We are men, my liege.
Mac. Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am one, my liege,
Whom the vile blows and buffets of the world
Have so incensed that I am reckless what
I do to spite the world.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
So weary with disasters, tugg’d with fortune,
That I would set my life on any chance,
To mend it, or be rid on ’t.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Things without all remedy
Should be without regard; what ’s done is done.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
We have scotch’d the snake, not kill’d it.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Better be with the dead,
Whom we, to gain our peace, have sent to peace,
Than on the torture of the mind to lie
In restless ecstasy. Duncan is in his grave;
After life’s fitful fever he sleeps well:
Treason has done his worst; nor stee
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
In them Nature’s copy ’s not eterne.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A deed of dreadful note.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Be innocent of the knowledge, dearest chuck,
Till thou applaud the deed.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Things bad begun make strong themselves by ill.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Now spurs the lated traveller apace
To gain the timely inn.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
But now I am cabin’d, cribb’d, confined, bound in
To saucy doubts and fears.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Now, good digestion wait on appetite,
And health on both!
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thou canst not say I did it; never shake
Thy gory locks at me.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
The air-drawn dagger.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
The time has been,
That when the brains were out the man would die,
And there an end; but now they rise again,
With twenty mortal murders on their crowns,
And push us from our stools.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I drink to the general joy o’ the whole table.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thou hast no speculation in those eyes
Which thou dost glare with!
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
A thing of custom,—’t is no other;
Only it spoils the pleasure of the time.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
What man dare, I dare:
Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear,
The arm’d rhinoceros, or the Hyrcan tiger,—
Take any shape but that, and my firm nerves
Shall never tremble.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Hence, horrible shadow!
Unreal mockery, hence!
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
You have displac’d the mirth, broke the good meeting,
With most admir’d disorder.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Can such things be,
And overcome us like a summer’s cloud,
Without our special wonder?
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Stand not upon the order of your going,
But go at once.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Macb. What is the night?
L. Macb. Almost at odds with morning, which is which.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am in blood
Stepp’d in so far that, should I wade no more,
Returning were as tedious as go o’er.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
My little spirit, see,
Sits in a foggy cloud, and stays for me.
Macbeth. ACT III Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.
Macbeth. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Eye of newt and toe of frog,
Wool of bat and tongue of dog.
Macbeth. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
By the pricking of my thumbs,
Something wicked this way comes.
      Open, locks,
      Whoever knocks!
Macbeth. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
How now, you secret, black, and midnight hags!
Macbeth. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A deed without a name.
Macbeth. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I ’ll make assurance double sure,
And take a bond of fate.
Macbeth. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Show his eyes, and grieve his heart;
Come like shadows, so depart!
Macbeth. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
What, will the line stretch out to the crack of doom?
Macbeth. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I ’ll charm the air to give a sound,
While you perform your antic round.
Macbeth. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The weird sisters.
Macbeth. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The flighty purpose never is o’ertook,
Unless the deed go with it.
Macbeth. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
When our actions do not,
Our fears do make us traitors.
Macbeth. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
For this relief much thanks: ’t is bitter cold,
And I am sick at heart.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
But in the gross and scope of my opinion,
This bodes some strange eruption to our state.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Whose sore task
Does not divide the Sunday from the week.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
This sweaty haste
Doth make the night joint-labourer with the day.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
In the most high and palmy state of Rome,
A little ere the mightiest Julius fell,
The graves stood tenantless, and the sheeted dead
Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
And then it started like a guilty thing
Upon a fearful summons.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Whether in sea or fire, in earth or air,
The extravagant and erring spirit hies
To his confine.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
It faded on the crowing of the cock.
Some say that ever ’gainst that season comes
Wherein our Saviour’s birth is celebrated,
The bird of dawning singeth all night long:
And then, they say, no spirit dares stir
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
So have I heard, and do in part believe it.
But, look, the morn, in russet mantle clad,
Walks o’er the dew of yon high eastward hill.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The memory be green.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
With an auspicious and a dropping eye,
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The head is not more native to the heart.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A little more than kin, and less than kind.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
All that lives must die,
Passing through nature to eternity.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Seems, madam! nay, it is; I know not “seems.”
’T is not alone my inky cloak, good mother,
Nor customary suits of solemn black.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
But I have that within which passeth show;
These but the trappings and the suits of woe.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is a fault to Heaven,
A fault against the dead, a fault to nature,
To reason most absurd.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, that this too too solid flesh would melt,
Thaw and resolve itself into a dew!
Or that the Everlasting had not fix’d
His canon ’gainst self-slaughter! O God! God!
How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable
Seem to me all the uses
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
That it should come to this!
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Hyperion to a satyr; so loving to my mother,
That he might not beteem the winds of heaven
Visit her face too roughly.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Why, she would hang on him,
As if increase of appetite had grown
By what it fed on.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Frailty, thy name is woman!
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A little month.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Like Niobe, all tears.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A beast, that wants discourse of reason.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
My father’s brother, but no more like my father
Than I to Hercules.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
It is not nor it cannot come to good.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thrift, thrift, Horatio! the funeral baked meats
Did coldly furnish forth the marriage tables.
Would I had met my dearest foe in heaven
Or ever I had seen that day.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
In my mind’s eye, Horatio.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
He was a man, take him for all in all,
I shall not look upon his like again.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Season your admiration for a while.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
In the dead vast and middle of the night.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Arm’d at point exactly, cap-a-pe.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A countenance more in sorrow than in anger.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
While one with moderate haste might tell a hundred.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Ham. His beard was grizzled,—no?
Hor. It was, as I have seen it in his life,
A sable silver’d.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let it be tenable in your silence still.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Give it an understanding, but no tongue.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Upon the platform, ’twixt eleven and twelve.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Foul deeds will rise,
Though all the earth o’erwhelm them, to men’s eyes.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A violet in the youth of primy nature,
Forward, not permanent, sweet, not lasting,
The perfume and suppliance of a minute.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The chariest maid is prodigal enough,
If she unmask her beauty to the moon:
Virtue itself ’scapes not calumnious strokes:
The canker galls the infants of the spring
Too oft before their buttons be disclosed,
And in the morn and liquid
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Do not, as some ungracious pastors do,
Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven;
Whiles, like a puff’d and reckless libertine,
Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads,
And recks not his own rede.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Give thy thoughts no tongue.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar.
Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried,
Grapple them to thy soul with hoops
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Beware
Of entrance to a quarrel; but being in,
Bear ’t that the opposed may beware of thee.
Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice;
Take each man’s censure, but reserve thy judgment.
Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
Bu
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
This above all: to thine own self be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to a
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Springes to catch woodcocks.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
When the blood burns, how prodigal the soul
Lends the tongue vows.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Be somewhat scanter of your maiden presence.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Ham. The air bites shrewdly; it is very cold.
Hor. It is a nipping and an eager air.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
But to my mind, though I am native here
And to the manner born, it is a custom
More honoured in the breach than the observance.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Angels and ministers of grace, defend us!
Be thou a spirit of health or goblin damn’d,
Bring with thee airs from heaven or blasts from hell,
Be thy intents wicked or charitable,
Thou comest in such a questionable shape
That I will spea
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I do not set my life at a pin’s fee.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
My fate cries out,
And makes each petty artery in this body
As hardy as the Nemean lion’s nerve.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Unhand me, gentlemen.
By heaven, I ’ll make a ghost of him that lets me!
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am thy father’s spirit,
Doom’d for a certain term to walk the night,
And for the day confin’d to fast in fires,
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
And duller shouldst thou be than the fat weed
That roots itself
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
O my prophetic soul!
My uncle!
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
O Hamlet, what a falling-off was there!
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
But, soft! methinks I scent the morning air;
Brief let me be. Sleeping within my orchard,
My custom always of the afternoon.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Cut off even in the blossoms of my sin,
Unhousell’d, disappointed, unaneled,
No reckoning made, but sent to my account
With all my imperfections on my head.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Leave her to heaven
And to those thorns that in her bosom lodge,
To prick and sting her.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
The glow-worm shows the matin to be near,
And ’gins to pale his uneffectual fire.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
While memory holds a seat
In this distracted globe. Remember thee!
Yea, from the table of my memory
I ’ll wipe away all trivial fond records.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Within the book and volume of my brain.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
O villain, villain, smiling, damned villain!
My tables,—meet it is I set it down,
That one may smile, and smile, and be a villain:
At least I ’m sure it may be so in Denmark.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Ham. There ’s ne’er a villain dwelling in all Denmark
But he ’s an arrant knave.
Hor. There needs no ghost, my lord, come from the grave
To tell us this.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Every man has business and desire,
Such as it is.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Art thou there, truepenny?
Come on—you hear this fellow in the cellarage.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
O day and night, but this is wondrous strange!
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Rest, rest, perturbed spirit!
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
The time is out of joint: O cursed spite,
That ever I was born to set it right!
Hamlet. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
The flash and outbreak of a fiery mind,
A savageness in unreclaimed blood.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
This is the very ecstasy of love.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Brevity is the soul of wit.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
More matter, with less art.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
That he is mad, ’t is true: ’t is true ’t is pity;
And pity ’t is ’t is true.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Find out the cause of this effect,
Or rather say, the cause of this defect,
For this effect defective comes by cause.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Doubt thou the stars are fire;
  Doubt that the sun doth move;
Doubt truth to be a liar;
  But never doubt I love.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
To be honest as this world goes, is to be one man picked out of ten thousand.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Still harping on my daughter.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Pol. What do you read, my lord?
Ham. Words, words, words.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
They have a plentiful lack of wit.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Though this be madness, yet there is method in ’t.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
On fortune’s cap we are not the very button.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A dream itself is but a shadow.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Beggar that I am, I am even poor in thanks.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
This goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o’erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pesti
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
There is something in this more than natural, if philosophy could find it out.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I know a hawk from a handsaw.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
O Jephthah, judge of Israel, what a treasure hadst thou!
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
One fair daughter and no more,
The which he loved passing well.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Come, give us a taste of your quality.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The play, I remember, pleased not the million; ’t was caviare to the general.
Hamlet. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Although the last, not least.
King Lear. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Nothing will come of nothing.
King Lear. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Mend your speech a little,
Lest it may mar your fortunes.
King Lear. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I want that glib and oily art,
To speak and purpose not.
King Lear. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
A still-soliciting eye, and such a tongue
As I am glad I have not.
King Lear. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Time shall unfold what plaited cunning hides.
King Lear. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
As if we were villains by necessity; fools by heavenly compulsion.
King Lear. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
That which ordinary men are fit for, I am qualified in; and the best of me is diligence.
King Lear. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Ingratitude, thou marble-hearted fiend!
King Lear. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
How sharper than a serpent’s tooth it is
To have a thankless child!
King Lear. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Striving to better, oft we mar what ’s well.
King Lear. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Hysterica passio, down, thou climbing sorrow,
Thy element ’s below.
King Lear. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Nature in you stands on the very verge
Of her confine.
King Lear. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Necessity’s sharp pinch!
King Lear. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let not women’s weapons, water-drops,
Stain my man’s cheeks!
King Lear. ACT II Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
King Lear. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
A poor, infirm, weak, and despised old man.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
There was never yet fair woman but she made mouths in a glass.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Tremble, thou wretch,
That hast within thee undivulged crimes,
Unwhipp’d of justice.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am a man
More sinn’d against than sinning.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Oh, that way madness lies; let me shun that.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Poor naked wretches, wheresoe’er you are,
That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm,
How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides,
Your looped and windowed raggedness, defend you
From seasons such as these?
King Lear. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Take physic, pomp;
Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Out-paramoured the Turk.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is a naughty night to swim in.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
The green mantle of the standing pool.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
But mice and rats, and such small deer,
Have been Tom’s food for seven long year.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
The prince of darkness is a gentleman.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Poor Tom ’s a-cold.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I ’ll talk a word with this same learned Theban.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Child Rowland to the dark tower came,
His word was still,—Fie, foh, and fum,
I smell the blood of a British man.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
The little dogs and all,
Tray, Blanch, and Sweetheart, see, they bark at me.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
Mastiff, greyhound, mongrel grim,
Hound or spaniel, brach or lym,
Or bobtail tike or trundle-tail.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am tied to the stake, and I must stand the course.
King Lear. ACT III Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
The lowest and most dejected thing of fortune.
King Lear. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The worst is not
So long as we can say, “This is the worst.”
King Lear. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Patience and sorrow strove
Who should express her goodliest.
King Lear. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Half way down
Hangs one that gathers samphire, dreadful trade!
Methinks he seems no bigger than his head:
The fishermen that walk upon the beach
Appear like mice.
King Lear. ACT IV Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
Nature ’s above art in that respect.
King Lear. ACT IV Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
Ay, every inch a king.
King Lear. ACT IV Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
Give me an ounce of civet, good apothecary, to sweeten my imagination.
King Lear. ACT IV Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
A man may see how this world goes with no eyes. Look with thine ears: see how yond justice rails upon yond simple thief. Hark, in thine ear: change places; and, handy-dandy, which is the justice, which is the thief?
King Lear. ACT IV Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
Through tatter’d clothes small vices do appear;
Robes and furr’d gowns hide all.
King Lear. ACT IV Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
Mine enemy’s dog,
Though he had bit me, should have stood that night
Against my fire.
King Lear. ACT IV Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Pray you now, forget and forgive.
King Lear. ACT IV Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Upon such sacrifices, my Cordelia,
The gods themselves throw incense.
King Lear. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The gods are just, and of our pleasant vices
Make instruments to plague us.
King Lear. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Her voice was ever soft,
Gentle, and low,—an excellent thing in woman.
King Lear. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Vex not his ghost: O, let him pass! he hates him much
That would upon the rack of this tough world
Stretch him out longer.
King Lear. ACT V Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
That never set a squadron in the field,
Nor the division of a battle knows.
Othello. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The bookish theoric.
Othello. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is the curse of service,
Preferment goes by letter and affection,
And not by old gradation, where each second
Stood heir to the first.
Othello. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
We cannot all be masters, nor all masters
Cannot be truly follow’d.
Othello. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Whip me such honest knaves.
Othello. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I will wear my heart upon my sleeve
For daws to peck at.
Othello. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
You are one of those that will not serve God, if the devil bid you.
Othello. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
The wealthy curled darlings of our nation.
Othello. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Most potent, grave, and reverend signiors,
My very noble and approv’d good masters,
That I have ta’en away this old man’s daughter,
It is most true; true, I have married her:
The very head and front of my offending
Hath this
Othello. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Her father loved me; oft invited me;
Still question’d me the story of my life,
From year to year, the battles, sieges, fortunes,
That I have passed.
I ran it through, even from my boyish days,
To the very moment that he bade me tell it
Othello. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
And often did beguile her of her tears,
When I did speak of some distressful stroke
That my youth suffer’d. My story being done,
She gave me for my pains a world of sighs;
She swore, in faith, ’t was strange, ’t was passing stra
Othello. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I do perceive here a divided duty.
Othello. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The robb’d that smiles, steals something from the thief.
Othello. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The tyrant custom, most grave senators,
Hath made the flinty and steel couch of war
My thrice-driven bed of down.
Othello. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I saw Othello’s visage in his mind.
Othello. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Put money in thy purse.
Othello. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The food that to him now is as luscious as locusts, shall be to him shortly as bitter as coloquintida.
Othello. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Framed to make women false.
Othello. ACT I Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
One that excels the quirks of blazoning pens.
Othello. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
For I am nothing, if not critical.
Othello. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am not merry; but I do beguile
The thing I am, by seeming otherwise.
Othello. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
She that was ever fair and never proud,
Had tongue at will, and yet was never loud.
Othello. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
She was a wight, if ever such wight were,—
Des. To do what?
Iago. To suckle fools and chronicle small beer.
Des. O most lame and impotent conclusion!
Othello. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
You may relish him more in the soldier than in the scholar.
Othello. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
If after every tempest come such calms,
May the winds blow till they have waken’d death!
Othello. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Egregiously an ass.
Othello. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have very poor and unhappy brains for drinking.
Othello. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Potations pottle-deep.
Othello. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
King Stephen was a worthy peer,
  His breeches cost him but a crown;
He held them sixpence all too dear,—
  With that he called the tailor lown.
Othello. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Silence that dreadful bell: it frights the isle
From her propriety.
Othello. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Your name is great
In mouths of wisest censure.
Othello. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thy honesty and love doth mince this matter.
Othello. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Cassio, I love thee;
But never more be officer of mine.
Othello. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Iago. What, are you hurt, lieutenant?
Cas. Ay, past all surgery.
Othello. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Reputation, reputation, reputation! Oh, I have lost my reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial.
Othello. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
O thou invisible spirit of wine, if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil!
Othello. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
O God, that men should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away their brains!
Othello. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Cas. Every inordinate cup is unbless’d, and the ingredient is a devil.
Iago. Come, come, good wine is a good familiar creature, if it be well used.
Othello. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
How poor are they that have not patience!
Othello. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Excellent wretch! Perdition catch my soul,
But I do love thee! and when I love thee not,
Chaos is come again.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Speak to me as to thy thinkings,
As thou dost ruminate, and give thy worst of thoughts
The worst of words.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Good name in man and woman, dear my lord,
Is the immediate jewel of their souls:
Who steals my purse steals trash; ’t is something, nothing;
’T was mine, ’t is his, and has been slave to thousands;
But he that filches from me my
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, beware, my lord, of jealousy!
It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock
The meat it feeds on.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
But, O, what damned minutes tells he o’er
Who dotes, yet doubts, suspects, yet strongly
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Poor and content is rich and rich enough.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
To be once in doubt
Is once to be resolv’d.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
If I do prove her haggard,
Though that her jesses were my dear heart-strings,
I ’ld whistle her off and let her down the wind,
To prey at fortune.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am declined
Into the vale of years.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
O curse of marriage,
That we can call these delicate creatures ours,
And not their appetites! I had rather be a toad,
And live upon the vapour of a dungeon,
Than keep a corner in the thing I love
For others’ uses.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Trifles light as air
Are to the jealous confirmations strong
As proofs of holy writ.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Not poppy, nor mandragora,
Nor all the drowsy syrups of the world,
Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep
Which thou owedst yesterday.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
I swear ’t is better to be much abused
Than but to know ’t a little.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
He that is robb’d, not wanting what is stolen,
Let him not know ’t, and he ’s not robb’d at all.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, now, for ever
Farewell the tranquil mind! farewell content!
Farewell the plumed troop and the big wars
That make ambition virtue! O, farewell!
Farewell the neighing steed and the shrill trump,
The spirit-stirring drum, the ear-piercing f
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Be sure of it; give me the ocular proof.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
No hinge nor loop
To hang a doubt on.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
On horror’s head horrors accumulate.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Take note, take note, O world,
To be direct and honest is not safe.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
But this denoted a foregone conclusion.
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Swell, bosom, with thy fraught,
For ’t is of aspics’ tongues!
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Like to the Pontic sea,
Whose icy current and compulsive course
Ne’er feels retiring ebb, but keeps due on
To the Propontic and the Hellespont,
Even so my bloody thoughts, with violent pace,
Shall ne’er look back, ne’er ebb t
Othello. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Our new heraldry is hands, not hearts.
Othello. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
To beguile many, and be beguil’d by one.
Othello. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
They laugh that win.
Othello. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
But yet the pity of it, Iago! O Iago, the pity of it, Iago!
Othello. ACT IV Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
I understand a fury in your words,
But not the words.
Othello. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Steep’d me in poverty to the very lips.
Othello. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
But, alas, to make me
A fixed figure for the time of scorn
To point his slow unmoving finger
Othello. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Patience, thou young and rose-lipp’d cherubin.
Othello. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
O thou weed,
Who art so lovely fair and smell’st so sweet
That the sense aches at thee, would thou hadst ne’er been born.
Othello. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
O Heaven, that such companions thou ’ldst unfold,
And put in every honest hand a whip
To lash the rascals naked through the world!
Othello. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is neither here nor there.
Othello. ACT IV Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
It makes us or it mars us.
Othello. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Every way makes my gain.
Othello. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
He hath a daily beauty in his life.
Othello. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
This is the night
That either makes me or fordoes me quite.
Othello. ACT V Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
And smooth as monumental alabaster.
Othello. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Put out the light, and then put out the light:
If I quench thee, thou flaming minister,
I can again thy former light restore
Should I repent me; but once put out thy light,
Thou cunning’st pattern of excelling nature,
I know not where
Othello. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
So sweet was ne’er so fatal.
Othello. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Had all his hairs been lives, my great revenge
Had stomach for them all.
Othello. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
One entire and perfect chrysolite.
Othello. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Curse his better angel from his side,
And fall to reprobation.
Othello. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Every puny whipster.
Othello. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Man but a rush against Othello’s breast,
And he retires.
Othello. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have done the state some service, and they know ’t.
No more of that. I pray you, in your letters,
When you shall these unlucky deeds relate,
Speak of me as I am; nothing extenuate,
Nor set down aught in malice. Then, must you speak
O
Othello. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I took by the throat the circumcised dog,
And smote him, thus.
Othello. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
There ’s beggary in the love that can be reckon’d.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
On the sudden
A Roman thought hath struck him.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
This grief is crowned with consolation.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT I Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Give me to drink mandragora.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Where ’s my serpent of old Nile?
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
A morsel for a monarch.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
My salad days,
When I was green in judgment.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT I Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Epicurean cooks
Sharpen with cloyless sauce his appetite.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Small to greater matters must give way.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The barge she sat in, like a burnish’d throne,
Burn’d on the water; the poop was beaten gold;
Purple the sails, and so perfumed that
The winds were love-sick with them; the oars were silver,
Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke, a
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale
Her infinite variety.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have not kept my square; but that to come
Shall all be done by the rule.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
’T was merry when
You wager’d on your angling; when your diver
Did hang a salt-fish on his hook, which he
With fervency drew up.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT II Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Come, thou monarch of the vine,
Plumpy Bacchus with pink eyne!
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT II Scene 7.

Author: William Shakespeare
Who does i’ the wars more than his captain can
Becomes his captain’s captain; and ambition,
The soldier’s virtue, rather makes choice of loss,
Than gain which darkens him.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT III Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
He wears the rose
Of youth upon him.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT III Scene 13.

Author: William Shakespeare
Men’s judgments are
A parcel of their fortunes; and things outward
Do draw the inward quality after them,
To suffer all alike.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT III Scene 13.

Author: William Shakespeare
To business that we love we rise betime,
And go to ’t with delight.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT IV Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
This morning, like the spirit of a youth
That means to be of note, begins betimes.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT IV Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
The shirt of Nessus is upon me.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT IV Scene 12.

Author: William Shakespeare
Sometime we see a cloud that ’s dragonish;
A vapour sometime like a bear or lion,
A tower’d citadel, a pendent rock,
A forked mountain, or blue promontory
With trees upon ’t.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT IV Scene 14.

Author: William Shakespeare
That which is now a horse, even with a thought
The rack dislimns, and makes it indistinct,
As water is in water.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT IV Scene 14.

Author: William Shakespeare
Since Cleopatra died,
I have liv’d in such dishonour that the gods
Detest my baseness.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT IV Scene 14.

Author: William Shakespeare
I am dying, Egypt, dying.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT IV Scene 15.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, wither’d is the garland of the war,
The soldier’s pole is fallen.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT IV Scene 15.

Author: William Shakespeare
Let ’s do it after the high Roman fashion.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT IV Scene 15.

Author: William Shakespeare
For his bounty,
There was no winter in ’t; an autumn ’t was
That grew the more by reaping.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
If there be, or ever were, one such,
It ’s past the size of dreaming.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Mechanic slaves
With greasy aprons, rules, and hammers.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have
Immortal longings in me.
Antony and Cleopatra. ACT V Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Lest the bargain should catch cold and starve.
Cymbeline. ACT I Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Hath his bellyful of fighting.
Cymbeline. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
How bravely thou becomest thy bed, fresh lily.
Cymbeline. ACT II Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
The most patient man in loss, the most coldest that ever turned up ace.
Cymbeline. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
Hark, hark! the lark at heaven’s gate sings,
  And Phœbus ’gins arise,
Cymbeline. ACT II Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
As chaste as unsunn’d snow.
Cymbeline. ACT II Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Some griefs are medicinable.
Cymbeline. ACT III Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Prouder than rustling in unpaid-for silk.
Cymbeline. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
So slippery that
The fear ’s as bad as falling.
Cymbeline. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
The game is up.
Cymbeline. ACT III Scene 3.

Author: William Shakespeare
No, ’t is slander,
Whose edge is sharper than the sword, whose tongue
Outvenoms all the worms of Nile, whose breath
Rides on the posting winds, and doth belie
All corners of the world.
Cymbeline. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Some jay of Italy,
Whose mother was her painting, hath betray’d him:
Poor I am stale, a garment out of fashion.
Cymbeline. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
It is no act of common passage, but
A strain of rareness.
Cymbeline. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
I have not slept one wink.
Cymbeline. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thou art all the comfort
The gods will diet me with.
Cymbeline. ACT III Scene 4.

Author: William Shakespeare
Weariness
Can snore upon the flint, when resty sloth
Finds the down pillow hard.
Cymbeline. ACT III Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
An angel! or, if not,
An earthly paragon!
Cymbeline. ACT III Scene 6.

Author: William Shakespeare
Triumphs for nothing and lamenting toys
Is jollity for apes and grief for boys.
Cymbeline. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
And put
My clouted brogues from off my feet.
Cymbeline. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney-sweepers, come to dust.
Cymbeline. ACT IV Scene 2.

Author: William Shakespeare
O, never say hereafter
But I am truest speaker. You call’d me brother
When I was but your sister.
Cymbeline. ACT V Scene 5.

Author: William Shakespeare
Like an arrow shot
From a well-experienc’d archer hits the mark
His eye doth level at.
Pericles. ACT I Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
3 Fish. Master, I marvel how the fishes live in the sea.
1 Fish. Why, as men do a-land: the great ones eat up the little ones.
Pericles. ACT II Scene 1.

Author: William Shakespeare
Bid me discourse, I will enchant thine ear.
Venus and Adonis. Line# 145.

Author: William Shakespeare
For he being dead, with him is beauty slain,
And, beauty dead, black chaos comes again.
Venus and Adonis. Line# 1019.

Author: William Shakespeare
The grass stoops not, she treads on it so light.
Venus and Adonis. Line# 1027.

Author: William Shakespeare
For greatest scandal waits on greatest state.
Lucrece. Line# 1306.

Author: William Shakespeare
Thou art thy mother’s glass, and she in thee
Calls back the lovely April of her prime.
Sonnet III

Author: William Shakespeare
And stretched metre of an antique song.
Sonnet XVII

Author: William Shakespeare
But thy eternal summer shall not fade.
Sonnet XVIII

Author: William Shakespeare
The painful warrior famoused for fight,
Sonnet XXV

Author: William Shakespeare
When to the sessions of sweet silent thought
I summon up remembrance of things past,
I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought,
And with old woes new wail my dear time’s waste.
Sonnet XXX

Author: William Shakespeare
Full many a glorious morning have I seen.
Sonnet XXXIII

Author: William Shakespeare
My grief lies onward and my joy behind.
Sonnet I

Author: William Shakespeare
Like stones of worth, they thinly placed are,
Or captain jewels in the carcanet.
Sonnet III

Author: William Shakespeare
The rose looks fair, but fairer we it deem
For that sweet odour which doth in it live.
Sonnet XIII

Author: William Shakespeare
Not marble, nor the gilded monuments
Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme.
Sonnet IV

Author: William Shakespeare
Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea,
But sad mortality o’ersways their power,
How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea,
Whose action is no stronger than a flower?
Sonnet XIV

Author: William Shakespeare
And art made tongue-tied by authority.
Sonnet lxvi.

Author: William Shakespeare
And simple truth miscall’d simplicity,
And captive good attending captain ill.
Sonnet XVI

Author: William Shakespeare
The ornament of beauty is suspect,
A crow that flies in heaven’s sweetest air.
Sonnet XX

Author: William Shakespeare
That time of year thou may’st in me behold,
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,—
Bare ruin’d choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
Sonnet XXIII

Author: William Shakespeare
Your monument shall be my gentle verse,
Which eyes not yet created shall o’er-read,
And tongues to be your being shall rehearse
When all the breathers of this world are dead;
You still shall live—such virtue hath my pen—
Wher
Sonnet XXXI

Author: William Shakespeare
Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing.
Sonnet XXXVII

Author: William Shakespeare
Do not drop in for an after-loss.
Ah, do not, when my heart hath ’scap’d this sorrow,
Come in the rearward of a conquer’d woe;
Give not a windy night a rainy morrow,
To linger out a purpos’d overthrow.
Sonnet XC

Author: William Shakespeare
When proud-pied April, dress’d in all his trim,
Hath put a spirit of youth in everything.
Sonnet XCVIII

Author: William Shakespeare
Still constant is a wondrous excellence.
Sonnet CV

Author: William Shakespeare
And beauty, making beautiful old rhyme.
Sonnet CVI

Author: William Shakespeare
My nature is subdu’d
To what it works in, like the dyer’s hand.
Sonnet CXI

Author: William Shakespeare
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments: love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds.
Sonnet CXVI

Author: William Shakespeare
’T is better to be vile than vile esteem’d,
When not to be receives reproach of being;
And the just pleasure lost which is so deem’d,
Not by our feeling, but by others’ seeing.
Sonnet CXXI

Author: William Shakespeare
No, I am that I am, and they that level
At my abuses reckon up their own.
Sonnet CXXI

Author: William Shakespeare
That full star that ushers in the even.
Sonnet CXXXII

Author: William Shakespeare
So on the tip of his subduing tongue
All kinds of arguments and questions deep,
All replication prompt, and reason strong,
For his advantage still did wake and sleep.
To make the weeper laugh, the laugher weep,
He had the dialect and differ
A Lover’s Complaint. Line# 120.

Author: William Shakespeare
O father, what a hell of witchcraft lies
In the small orb of one particular tear.
A Lover’s Complaint. Line# 288.

Author: William Shakespeare
Bad in the best, though excellent in neither.
The Passionate Pilgrim. III

Author: William Shakespeare
Crabbed age and youth
Cannot live together.
The Passionate Pilgrim. VIII

Author: William Shakespeare
Have you not heard it said full oft,
A woman’s nay doth stand for naught?
The Passionate Pilgrim. XIV

Author: William Shakespeare
Cursed be he that moves my bones.
Shakespeare’s Epitaph.



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