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Bartlett's Familiar Quotations

A Collection of Passages, Phrases, and Proverbs Traced to Their Sources in Ancient and Modern Literature


The following 99 quotes match your criteria:


Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
This laurel greener from the brows
Of him that uttered nothing base.
To the Queen.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
And statesmen at her council met
  Who knew the seasons, when to take
  Occasion by the hand, and make
The bounds of freedom wider yet.
To the Queen.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Broad based upon her people’s will,
And compassed by the inviolate sea.
To the Queen.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
For it was in the golden prime
  Of good Haroun Alraschid.
Recollections of the Arabian Nights.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Dowered with the hate of hate, the scorn of scorn,
The love of love.
The Poet.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
A still small voice spake unto me,
“Thou art so full of misery,
Were it not better not to be?”
The Two Voices.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
This truth within thy mind rehearse,
That in a boundless universe
Is boundless better, boundless worse.
The Two Voices.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Tho’ thou wert scattered to the wind,
Yet is there plenty of the kind.
The Two Voices.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
No life that breathes with human breath
Has ever truly longed for death.
The Two Voices.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Like glimpses of forgotten dreams.
The Two Voices.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Across the walnuts and the wine.
The Miller’s Daughter.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Self-reverence, self-knowledge, self-control,—
These three alone lead life to sovereign power.
Œnone.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
  Because right is right, to follow right
Were wisdom in the scorn of consequence.
Œnone.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
I built my soul a lordly pleasure-house,
  Wherein at ease for aye to dwell.
The Palace of Art.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Her manners had not that repose
  Which stamps the caste of Vere de Vere.
Lady Clara Vere de Vere. Stanza 5.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
  From yon blue heaven above us bent,
The grand old gardener and his wife
Lady Clara Vere de Vere. Stanza 7.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Howe’er it be, it seems to me,
  ’T is only noble to be good.
Lady Clara Vere de Vere. Stanza 7.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
You must wake and call me early, call me early, mother dear;
To-morrow’ll be the happiest time of all the glad New Year,—
Of all the glad New Year, mother, the maddest, merriest day;
For I ’m to be Queen o’ the May, mother, I
The May Queen.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
            Ah, why
Should life all labour be?
The Lotus-Eaters. iv.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
A daughter of the gods, divinely tall,
  And most divinely fair.
A Dream of fair Women. Stanza xxii.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
God gives us love. Something to love
  He lends us; but when love is grown
To ripeness, that on which it throve
  Falls off, and love is left alone.
To J. S.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Sleep sweetly, tender heart, in peace!
  Sleep, holy spirit, blessed soul,
While the stars burn, the moons increase,
  And the great ages onward roll.
To J. S.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Sleep till the end, true soul and sweet!
  Nothing comes to thee new or strange.
Sleep full of rest from head to feet;
  Lie still, dry dust, secure of change.
To J. S.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
More black than ash-buds in the front of March.
The Gardener’s Daughter.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Of love that never found his earthly close,
What sequel? Streaming eyes and breaking hearts;
Or all the same as if he had not been?
Love and Duty.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
The long mechanic pacings to and fro,
The set, gray life, and apathetic end.
Love and Duty.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
    Ah, when shall all men’s good
Be each man’s rule, and universal peace
Lie like a shaft of light across the land,
And like a lane of beams athwart the sea,
Thro’ all the circle of the golden year?
The golden Year.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
I am a part of all that I have met.
Ulysses.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
How dull it is to pause, to make an end,
To rust unburnished, not to shine in use,—
As tho’ to breathe were life!
Ulysses.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Much have I seen and known; cities of men
And manners, climates, councils, governments;
And much delight of battle with my peers
Far on the ringing plains of windy Troy.
Ulysses.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles,
And see the great Achilles whom we knew.
Ulysses.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Here at the quiet limit of the world.
Tithonus.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
In the spring a livelier iris changes on the burnished dove;
In the spring a young man’s fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love.
Locksley Hall. Line 19.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Love took up the harp of Life, and smote on all the chords with might;
Smote the chord of Self, that, trembling, passed in music out of sight.
Locksley Hall. Line 33.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
He will hold thee, when his passion shall have spent its novel force,
Something better than his dog, a little dearer than his horse.
Locksley Hall. Line 49.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
      This is truth the poet sings,
That a sorrow’s crown of sorrow is remembering happier things.
Locksley Hall. Line 75.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Like a dog, he hunts in dreams.
Locksley Hall. Line 79.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
With a little hoard of maxims preaching down a daughter’s heart.
Locksley Hall. Line 94.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
But the jingling of the guinea helps the hurt that Honour feels.
Locksley Hall. Line 105.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Men, my brothers, men the workers, ever reaping something new.
Locksley Hall. Line 117.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Yet I doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs,
And the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.
Locksley Hall. Line 137.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers.
Locksley Hall. Line 141.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
I will take some savage woman, she shall rear my dusky race.
Locksley Hall. Line 168.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
I, the heir of all the ages, in the foremost files of time.
Locksley Hall. Line 178.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Let the great world spin forever down the ringing grooves of change.
Locksley Hall. Line 182.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Better fifty years of Europe than a cycle of Cathay.
Locksley Hall. Line 184.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
And on her lover’s arm she leant,
  And round her waist she felt it fold,
And far across the hills they went
  In that new world which is the old.
The Day-Dream. The Departure, i.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
And o’er the hills, and far away
  Beyond their utmost purple rim,
Beyond the night, across the day,
  Thro’ all the world she followed him.
The Day-Dream. The Departure, i.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
We are ancients of the earth,
And in the morning of the times.
L’ Envoi.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
As she fled fast through sun and shade
The happy winds upon her played,
Blowing the ringlet from the braid.
Sir Launcelot and Queen Guinevere.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
For now the poet can not die,
  Nor leave his music as of old,
  But round him ere he scarce be cold
Begins the scandal and the cry.
To ———, after reading a Life and Letters.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
But oh for the touch of a vanished hand,
  And the sound of a voice that is still!
Break, break, break.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
But the tender grace of a day that is dead
  Will never come back to me.
Break, break, break.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
For men may come and men may go,
  But I go on forever.
The Brook.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Mastering the lawless science of our law,—
That codeless myriad of precedent,
That wilderness of single instances.
Aylmer’s Field.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Insipid as the queen upon a card.
Aylmer’s Field.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Rich in saving common-sense,
And, as the greatest only are,
In his simplicity sublime.
Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington. Stanza 4.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Oh good gray head which all men knew!
Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington. Stanza 4.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
          That tower of strength
Which stood four-square to all the winds that blew.
Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington. Stanza 4.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
For this is England’s greatest son,
He that gained a hundred fights,
And never lost an English gun.
Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington. Stanza 6.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Not once or twice in our rough-island story
The path of duty was the way to glory.
Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington. Stanza 8.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
All in the valley of death
  Rode the six hundred.
The Charge of the Light Brigade. Stanza 1.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
  Some one had blundered:
Theirs not to make reply,
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do and die.
The Charge of the Light Brigade. Stanza 2.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon in front of them.
.    .    .    .    .
Into the jaws of death,
The Charge of the Light Brigade. Stanza 3.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
That a lie which is half a truth is ever the blackest of lies;
That a lie which is all a lie may be met and fought with outright;
But a lie which is part a truth is a harder matter to fight.
The Grandmother. Stanza 8.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
O Love! what hours were thine and mine,
In lands of palm and southern pine;
  In lands of palm, of orange-blossom,
Of olive, aloe, and maize and vine!
The Daisy. Stanza 1.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
So dear a life your arms enfold,
Whose crying is a cry for gold.
The Daisy. Stanza 24.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Read my little fable:
  He that runs may read.
The Flower.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
With prudes for proctors, dowagers for deans,
And sweet girl-graduates in their golden hair.
The Princess. Prologue. Line 141.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
A rosebud set with little wilful thorns,
And sweet as English air could make her, she.
The Princess. Part i. Line 153.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
            Jewels five-words-long,
That on the stretched forefinger of all Time
Sparkle forever.
The Princess. Part ii. Line 355.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Blow, bugle, blow! set the wild echoes flying!
Blow, bugle! answer, echoes! dying, dying, dying.
The Princess. Part iii. Line 352.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
O Love! they die in yon rich sky,
  They faint on hill or field or river:
Our echoes roll from soul to soul,
  And grow forever and forever.
Blow, bugle, blow! set the wild echoes flying!
And answer, echoes, answer! dyin
The Princess. Part iii. Line 360.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
There sinks the nebulous star we call the sun.
The Princess. Part iv. Line 1.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
  Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean.
Tears from the depth of some divine despair
Rise in the heart and gather to the eyes,
In looking on the happy autumn-fields,
And thinking of the days that are no more.
The Princess. Part iv. Line 21.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
                Unto dying eyes
The casement slowly grows a glimmering square.
The Princess. Part iv. Line 33.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
  Dear as remembered kisses after death,
And sweet as those by hopeless fancy feigned
On lips that are for others; deep as love,—
Deep as first love, and wild with all regret.
Oh death in life, the days that are no more!
The Princess. Part iv. Line 36.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
        Sweet is every sound,
Sweeter thy voice, but every sound is sweet;
Myriads of rivulets hurrying thro’ the lawn,
The moan of doves in immemorial elms,
And murmuring of innumerable bees.
The Princess. Part vii. Line 203.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
                    Happy he
With such a mother! faith in womankind
Beats with his blood, and trust in all things high
Comes easy to him; and tho&
The Princess. Part vii. Line 308.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Let knowledge grow from more to more.
In Memoriam. Prologue. Line 25.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
I held it truth, with him who sings
In Memoriam. i. Stanza 1.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
But for the unquiet heart and brain
  A use in measured language lies;
  The sad mechanic exercise
Like dull narcotics numbing pain.
In Memoriam. v. Stanza 2.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
          Never morning wore
To evening, but some heart did break.
In Memoriam. vi. Stanza 2.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
  And topples round the dreary west
A looming bastion fringed with fire.
In Memoriam. xv. Stanza 5.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
  And from his ashes may be made
The violet of his native land.
In Memoriam. xviii. Stanza 1.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
  I do but sing because I must,
And pipe but as the linnets sing.
In Memoriam. xxi. Stanza 6.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
The shadow cloaked from head to foot.
In Memoriam. xxiii. Stanza 1.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Who keeps the keys of all the creeds.
In Memoriam. xxiii. Stanza 2.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
  And Thought leapt out to wed with Thought
Ere Thought could wed itself with Speech.
In Memoriam. xxiii. Stanza 4.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
  ’T is better to have loved and lost
Than never to have loved at all.
In Memoriam. xxvii. Stanza 4.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Her eyes are homes of silent prayer.
In Memoriam. xxxii. Stanza 1.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
  Whose faith has centre everywhere,
Nor cares to fix itself to form.
In Memoriam. xxxiii. Stanza 1.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
My own dim life should teach me this
  That life shall live for evermore.
In Memoriam. xxxiv. Stanza 1.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
  Short swallow-flights of song, that dip
Their wings in tears, and skim away.
In Memoriam. xlviii. Stanza 4.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Hold thou the good; define it well;
  For fear divine Philosophy
  Should push beyond her mark, and be
Procuress to the Lords of Hell.
In Memoriam. liii. Stanza 4.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
Oh yet we trust that somehow good
  Will be the final goal of ill.
In Memoriam. liv. Stanza 1.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
        But what am I?
  An infant crying in the night:
  An infant crying for the light,
And with no language but a cry.
In Memoriam. liv. Stanza 5.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
  So careful of the type she seems,
So careless of the single life.
In Memoriam. lv. Stanza 2.

Author: Alfred Tennyson Tennyson
        The great world’s altar-stairs,
That slope through darkness up to God.
In Memoriam. lv. Stanza 4.



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