Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: This was sometime a paradox, but now the time gives it proof

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    2

    This was sometime a paradox, but now the time gives it proof

    Why would Hamlet (Shakespeare) call this a paradox? To what works / authors might Shakespeare be referring (Donne - Why are the fairest, falsest, Guazzo - Beauty breedeth temptation)?

    There seems to be no paradox, but Hamlet never says anything without a reason, so what is it?

  2. #2
    The Gnu Normal Pompey Bum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    6,353
    Because having someone else do your homework for you robs you of the actual learning process? Paradoxical!
    Last edited by Pompey Bum; 08-02-2018 at 10:26 AM.
    And this from a man in a bunny suit.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    2

    Sometimes just asking the question helps come up with an answer

    Beauty is similar, if not synonymous, with God's glory, so beauty and honesty go hand-in-hand and it would engender a paradox to think otherwise. Hamlet (mischievously) conflates God's beauty with physical attractiveness when he declares that it is no longer a paradox to think of Beauty and Honesty as combatants, with Beauty having the upper hand.


    Any other interpretations?

  4. #4
    The Gnu Normal Pompey Bum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    6,353
    No, I'd go with that one. Just be sure to footnote it. ;-)
    And this from a man in a bunny suit.

  5. #5
    stanley2
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    70
    As Pompey Bum suggests, a good place to start is a dictionary. That is, look up or review the terms "paradox" and irony. The editors of the new Arden edition wrote that paradox, as used here, means an "absurd statement." John Andrews wrote much the same thing: "a statement to be treated sceptically." The Arden editors also noted that the passage also recalls passages from AS YOU LIKE IT. One also might recall the speech in ROMEO AND JULIET that begins: "O serpent heart, hid with a flow'ring face!"(ROM3.2.75-87). In Sonnet 147 we find: "For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, / Who art as black as hell, as dark as night."

  6. #6
    stanley2
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    70
    Dang. The line Mr. Jones asked about is from Act 3, scene 1, line 112 or so from the play. Jones seems to like the idea that Hamlet is presenting once again an "antic disposition"(1.5.179 or so). Isaac Asimov agreed with the idea that Hamlet is aware that his uncle is listening nearby and describes Hamlet's speech to the girl as a "crescendo of cruel sarcasm."

Similar Threads

  1. The Paradox of Revenge
    By Drnobody901 in forum General Literature
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 01-20-2014, 01:24 AM
  2. Regret's Paradox
    By everyadventure in forum Short Story Sharing
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-29-2011, 12:48 PM
  3. Zeno's paradox
    By Kyriakos in forum Philosophical Literature
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 01-18-2011, 01:19 PM
  4. The Time-Traveling Grandma Killer: A Paradox
    By NovemberGuest in forum Serious Discussions
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 10-15-2009, 03:37 AM
  5. Paradox
    By withoutyou in forum Short Story Sharing
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-23-2008, 06:40 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •