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Thread: spices

  1. #1
    confidentially pleased cacian's Avatar
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    Lightbulb spices

    I like spices and like the saying goes:
    I like to spicy it up a bit

    I love cinnamon which is a sweet spice
    I also like black pepper but it has to be the fresh that you put in a grinder.

    which spices do you use lot and why?
    it may never try
    but when it does it sigh
    it is just that
    good
    it fly

  2. #2
    MANICHAEAN MANICHAEAN's Avatar
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    Having a passion for Indian cuisine I am always well stocked up with the following:

    1. Cardamom. Green is the more common variety, I use for everything from spice mixes to Indian desserts. The flavor is light and sweet, with a mild eucalyptus note.

    2. Cloves. Its anise notes are easily recognizable in many Indian preparations. I use them either whole or blended into spice mixes. They do need to be used with caution, as they can tend to overpower more delicate spices.

    3. Cassia bark is an interesting spice. It is a part of the cinnamon tree but has a milder flavor than true cinnamon.

    4. Black pepper which Iím sure we are all familiar with. Like most spices, black pepper needs to be toasted before blending. For the best flavor, however, fresh black pepper can also be ground directly into dishes.

    5. Cumin I use frequently whole and in spice mixes to add a smoky note to Indian dishes. It can be identified by its distinct ridged brown seeds and strong fragrance. One thing I keep in mind while dry-roasting this spice is that it burns really easily, and burnt cumin tastes very bitter and will be very noticeable your dish. Toast this spice until your nose just gets a whiff of smoke and fragrance (about 30 seconds max), and then let it cool before blending into mixes.

    6. Coriander is one of the oldest-known spices in the world and the seeds are very aromatic with citrus notes. Like cumin, it needs to be dry-roasted until you can start seeing a light golden-brown tinge to the seeds and they start "dancing" and popping in the pan.

    7. Nutmeg and mace. Mace is the dark-red outer covering of the nutmeg. This I normally grate onto my dishes.

    8. Mustard seeds. Their flavor is released when they are crushed or cooked in oil. Their smoky, nutty flavor is a staple in curries.

    9. Fenugreek is a spice with a very characteristic, earthy, musky "curry" flavor and fragrance. The seeds are yellowish and look like tiny wheat kernels. Fenugreek seeds are strongly fragranced and should be used with caution, just like cloves.

    10. Turmeric is another common Indian spice.It has a pungent, earthy fragrance; I use it in small quantities to give a beautiful golden color.

    11. Saffron. Expensive, dark-red in color. The fresher the saffron, the deeper the color. The flavor of saffron is very unique; floral and honey are noted when I smell it. Use in small quantities, usually dissolved in warm water or milk before adding to dishes.

  3. #3
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    Cilantro, the leaf of the plant the seed of which is called coriander, is my favorite. Cumin is also wonderful. I used to love hot spices when I was younger, but at some point they decided not to love me back.

  4. #4
    TheFairyDogMother kiz_paws's Avatar
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    I like "Montreal Steak Spice" on many meats (pork chops, steak, hamburgers, chicken) … it is perfect when grilling the meat on the barbeque.

    I use a lot of cumin, basil, marjoram, oregano, poultry seasoning when I cook -- but depending on what the dish is the spices, of course, would vary.

    In any case, my spice cabinet has a little bit of everything, and lots of what I use daily.
    Our task must be to free ourselves by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty
    ~Albert Einstein

  5. #5
    Registered User prendrelemick's Avatar
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    Salt and pepper are a given, after that I use chilli powder the most. Herbs are more my thing, especially fresh basil and parsley .
    ay up

  6. #6
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    Basil/pesto is wonderful, but I get habituated to it from time to time and have to take breaks. And though it's not really a spice, adding a dash of lime to fresh fish is awesome (and keeps off the scurvy ).

  7. #7
    TheFairyDogMother kiz_paws's Avatar
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    Yes, using lime is effective in a lot of my recipes … sour coleslaw, chili con carne, pasta salad (in conjunction with lots of dill), and salmon, just to name a few.
    Our task must be to free ourselves by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty
    ~Albert Einstein

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