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Thread: Catch 22 - why so highly regarded?

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    Catch 22 - why so highly regarded?

    It seems this novel is routinely listed as one of the greatest English language novels of the 20th century and I'm wondering why. I'm not saying it doesn't deserve that status, I'm just curious why it has it.

    Do you think it is because it was innovative/influential or is that it didn't represent something new, it's just that good?

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    You must figure mass readers are into innovation, eh?

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    I never said anything about popular success. I'm talking about reputation as a great novel.

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    He managed to find a voice that stuck in American consciousness.

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    I am not sure it is the best anti-war book. The only bits I really liked were to do with Milo Minderbender. I thought that was a great satire on the finance sector. I read it shortly after hearing what collateralized debt obligations and credit default swaps were after the 2008 banking crisis.
    According to Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence once said that Balzac was 'a gigantic dwarf', and in a sense the same is true of Dickens.
    Charles Dickens, by George Orwell

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