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Thread: Raphael Samuel

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    Raphael Samuel

    Raphael Samuel was a committed socialist who left the Communist Party when in 1956 Hungary was invaded by Soviet Russia.

    You can read more of him in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raphael_Samuel.

    He was from the East End of London.

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    Raphael Samuel is an entirely British website. Since he died of cancer quite young (see above link) his work is being continued by others.

    See this website: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_Workshop_Journal.

    "The main aim of the History Workshop movement was to promote the historiographical tradition known variously as history from below, social history, the history of everyday life, or simply people's history. Bill Schwarz wrote that the "History Workshop functioned in Britain as an effective alternative historical apparatus. It countered the intellectual and political conservatism of the dominant historical profession, setting up an alternative means for producing historical knowledge which had roots deep in the subordinate groups of British society".[4] Samuel defined the movement as being "the belief that history is or ought to be a collaborative enterprise, one in which the researcher, the archivist, the curator and the teacher, the 'do-it-yourself' enthusiast and the local historian, the family history societies and the individual archaeologist, should all be regarded as equally engaged."[5]

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    The Bishopsgate Institute: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bishopsgate_Institute continues the work and perspective of Raphael Samuel and other contributors to the perspective.

    I bought an early copy of the History Workshop Journal, published while Samuel was still alive. It was clearly inspired by Samuel's radical perspective, there was never any shortage of material to publish. It spoke to the younger generation of researchers who have contributed their own work to the journal. One of these is an old colleague from my time at King's College, Aberdeen University. Ian Carter, who wrote two articles published here on class and rural issues. Ian has also had a book published on Farm Life in Northeast Scotland 1840-1914: the poor man's country (1979).

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    The History Workshop Journal - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_Workshop_Journal - launched in 1976 - is the academic journal of the movement.

    "The main aim of the History Workshop movement was to promote the historiographical tradition known variously as history from below, social history, the history of everyday life, or simply people's history. Bill Schwarz wrote that the "History Workshop functioned in Britain as an effective alternative historical apparatus. It countered the intellectual and political conservatism of the dominant historical profession, setting up an alternative means for producing historical knowledge which had roots deep in the subordinate groups of British society".[4] Samuel defined the movement as being "the belief that history is or ought to be a collaborative enterprise, one in which the researcher, the archivist, the curator and the teacher, the 'do-it-yourself' enthusiast and the local historian, the family history societies and the individual archaeologist, should all be regarded as equally engaged."[5]

    During the 1970s and early 1980s, the History Workshop movement grew in popularity, which saw the foundation of a number of local History Workshops and a series of pamphlets, books and journals, including the History Workshop Journal. The British movement also inspired several international History Workshops in Europe, South Africa and America.[6]"

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    "An associated website, the History Workshop Online, was launched by the editorial collective of the History Workshop Journal in 2011.[7] This moderated website publishes shorter and more contemporary-focused articles than appear in History Workshop Journal, as well as editorials, debates, news and events, and a series of articles on "Radical Objects". These "Radical Objects" are tangible objects, such as badges or pamphlets, with direct relationships to events or themes in radical history.[8] In October 2012, the History Workshop Online, in collaboration with the Bishopsgate Institute, launched an online archive of material from the History Workshop Movement, which includes background information about each History Workshop and associated events from the 1960s to the 1990s. The material available on the History Workshop archive also includes scans of images, tickets and pamphlets and audio recordings from the History Workshops themselves.[9]"

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    History Workshop online in the website for the journal and its associated areas of interest. See http://www.historyworkshop.org.uk.

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    At the end of the above link is the following about Raphael Samuel and his wife Alison Light:

    Raphael Samuel was one of the pioneers of ‘history from below’ and one of the founders of History Workshop. He was described by Stuart Hall as one of “the most outstanding, original intellectuals of his generation.”

    Alison Light is a celebrated writer and scholar. Her remarkable work takes her readers into the fine grain and texture of everyday lives. It’s the relationships between family, friends, and members of a community that matter in her work, because these form the daily substance of life. She shows how these relationships are shaped by ideas about economics, culture, nation, race, class and gender. Her work has been applauded for opening up new vistas, and for using women’s history and popular fiction as a way of illustrating how family history is public history. Her book Common People published in 2014 was shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson prize in non-fiction. She is currently an Honorary Professor in the Department of English, at University College, London; and a Senior Associate of Pembroke College, Oxford.

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    A bibliography of Samuel's work is found at the following link:
    http://www.historyworkshop.org.uk/ra...-bibliography/

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