Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Novels with greatest literary architecture?

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    5

    Novels with greatest literary architecture?

    I donít mean plot structure per se, though that is not excluded ó I mean in terms of the structure of the novel as a whole, the interrelationship of its parts, its points of view, its characters, etc.

    In other words, which were the novels which show the most painstaking thought and composition and planning?
    Last edited by theorange; 02-09-2018 at 01:03 PM.

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    165
    I think War and Peace has that great structure to it. Then Blood Meridian, The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby.

    Inventory ask heard Anna Karenina is beautifully structured

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    4
    I think Harry Potter is really good. The way the whole series are tied together is just amazing. Every book has a plot twist and the whole book series itself is one big plot twist in the end. Reading Harry Potter as a teen always made me read at the edge of my seat!

  4. #4
    Ecurb Ecurb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Eugene, OR
    Posts
    2,127
    Quote Originally Posted by ajvenigalla View Post
    I think War and Peace has that great structure to it. Then Blood Meridian, The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby.

    Inventory ask heard Anna Karenina is beautifully structured
    War and Peace is a meandering mish-mash, the structure of which is loosely conceived. It starts slowly and has long sections that are irrelevant to the story (the Free Mason induction, for one). "Anna Karenina", on the other hand, starts with a bang, has characters that are all structurally related (Levin's brothers mirror different sides of his personality; Kitty, like Anna, is in love with Vronsky; Anna's problems are similar to those of her brother, exacerbated because her passions are pitched to a higher level, etc., etc.).

    War and Peace is (perhaps) the greatest of all novels (and I prefer it to Anna), but it isn't because of its structure.

  5. #5
    Registered User Jackson Richardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Somewhere in the South East of England
    Posts
    1,199
    I haven't read it for ages, but Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse has a definite structure other than the merely narrative. As does The Waves, which has no narrative and only the thoughts of the protagonists.

    I bet Henry James sweated blood over the structure of his novels, but despite strenuous efforts on my part, I've never appreciated him.

    Ulysses anybody?
    Previously JonathanB

    The more I read, the more I shall covet to read. Robert Burton The Anatomy of Melancholy Partion3, Section 1, Member 1, Subsection 1

Similar Threads

  1. The 40 Greatest Literary Parties
    By Ecurb in forum General Literature
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 02-06-2014, 07:16 AM
  2. Greatest WWII Literary Works by Japanese Writers
    By kurage in forum General Literature
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-29-2013, 10:25 AM
  3. Ten Greatest American Novels or Novellas
    By Jassy Melson in forum General Literature
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 09-30-2012, 08:37 AM
  4. The Novel 100: A Ranking of the Greatest Novels of All Time
    By ajabahey33 in forum General Literature
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-29-2011, 07:52 PM
  5. Greatest maritime adventure novels?
    By haprdgn in forum General Literature
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 10-13-2009, 02:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •