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Thread: Virginia Woolf - great writer or intellectual show-off?

  1. #16
    Registered User kev67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danik 2016 View Post
    Maybe if you read it as novel which is a very subjective account of how a certain middle class went though pre - and post II World War times it will become more interesting. It is also a good example of internal monologue. Or try Orlando, where there is more action, even if it is highly subjective too.

    The next Woolf book is The Waves at Number 16. Orlando is in the top 100 somewhere. The characters in Lighthouse seem like aliens to me. Society has changed a lot in the last 90 years. At one point Mrs Ramsey has the poem The Charge of the Light Brigade stuck in her head. I wonder if that poen is even taught in schools any more. I suppose Mrs Ramsey is a wife and mother to eight children, some grown up. She spends much time thinking about them. I don't have much family and don't spend much time thinking about them.
    According to Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence once said that Balzac was 'a gigantic dwarf', and in a sense the same is true of Dickens.
    Charles Dickens, by George Orwell

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    Registered User Jackson Richardson's Avatar
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    I'm in a Virginia Woolf phase. I've recently re-read To the Lighthouse, Between the Acts Mrs Dalloway, Orlando and Flush. I've got Jacob's Room on the stocks. I'm not sure I like her, but I'm intrigued.

    Last time I read Orlando I thought it deeply pretentious. This time I realised it was parodic.

    I like Between the Acts because I could finish it within 24 hours.

    I did To the Lighthouse for A level and did well, despite the fact that in those days nobody thought to mention the words modernism or feminism. I came up with my very own revisionist account of it: Mrs Ramsey's death is in a way a liberation for her husband of her overbearing influence. Having re-read it that is not fair, but it is certainly about coming to terms with loss.
    Previously JonathanB

    The more I read, the more I shall covet to read. Robert Burton The Anatomy of Melancholy Partion3, Section 1, Member 1, Subsection 1

  3. #18
    Registered User kev67's Avatar
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    I saw a young woman on a train reading the book a couple of days ago. I dare say she'd have been turning the pages quicker if it had been Jilly Cooperr's Riders. I still can't see how number 2 in the top 100 British novels, according to the BBC culture list, can be so tedious. I think there must be something wrong with that list.
    According to Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence once said that Balzac was 'a gigantic dwarf', and in a sense the same is true of Dickens.
    Charles Dickens, by George Orwell

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