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Thread: From My Bookshelves

  1. #16
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    An old book that I love is by Alfred Watkins The Old Straight Track(Abacus, 1994).

    First published in 1925 and out of print for many years, The Old Straight Track remains the most important source for the study of the ancient straight tracks or leys that criss-cross the British Isles - a fascinating system which was old when the Romans came to Britain." (back cover text)

    Another book that I bought is Francis Hitching Earth Magic (Picador, 1976). This is a world-wide phenomenon.

    But Watkins book is very detailed and unique. Many ley lines are found in the English border country near Wales, where Watkins was born (Hereford).

  2. #17
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    Norbert Elias Reflections on a life Polity Press (1994).

    I was a first year student at Leicester University when I attended his lectures (and also Anthony Giddens). I was very impressed by Elias, especially. It is in English and well worth reading!

  3. #18
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    Merilyn Moos The Language of Silence Cressida Press (2010). Merilyn was the child of jewish refugees from Germany, and since my father never wanted to talk about his Jewish background it created a silence around his life, similar to that which the author, Merilyn experienced in hers. So I bought her book, only to find that in many respects there were, of course, many differences. In the first place my aunt took me to Czechoslovakia several times, so I could visit the places that my father lived in - Puchov, Levoča, Nitra - a voyage of discovery as a young teenager I learned a lot from. Of course, still there were silences I could not explore, but it was a start.

  4. #19
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    Bernadotte: Napoleon's Marshal, Sweden's King Alan Palmer (John Murray Ltd, 1990).

    Lacking a male heir to the throne, John-Paul Bernadotte applied and became King of Sweden in 1818, as Charles X1V of Sweden and Norway. His line still rules today, the current Bernadotte King of Sweden (though no longer King of Norway). As Charles XIV John, Bernadotte made Sweden neutral, and it has been neutral ever since. This book tells the story of this extraordinary man.

  5. #20
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    This thread gives just a small selection from my bookshelves. In addition I have some 20 books by Anne Perry, 6 by Peter Robinson, 2 by David Baldacci, several in Swedish by Jan Guillou, the 4 volumes by Vilhelm Moberg on Swedish immigrants to Minnesota, two on the Habsburg Dual Monarchy, and one by Julia Orringer The Invisible Bridge. I have two by Anthony Beevor on the fall of Berlin and Stalingrad.

    Its not impossible that I may add to this thread in the future, as reading is one of my increasingly important pastimes as I get older.

  6. #21
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    I also have two books by Anthony Beevor "Stalingrad" and "Berlin". Stalingrad was circa the day I was born, the panzers were racing for the Don crossings. Two vital events that formed the early postwar years. The success with which the Russians, almost single-handedly, defeated Nazi Germany was remarkable. In the end, the allies (mainly Britain, France and the USA) had to hasten to reach Berlin at the same time as the Russians did.

    The other event was the success of Miklós Horthy in preserving the jews of Hungary from extinction. The above link shows how much he did. It didn't help my father, whose relatives were all killed in Auschwitz, but today the Jewish minority in Hungary is thriving and the second largest synagogue in the world at Dohany Utsa (Tobacco Street) in Budapest is thanks to the rule of Horthy. Even today the present Hungarian Government has good relations with the Putin Regime in Russia, and the Hungarians were the first to throw off the Soviet Yoke in 1956: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungar...lution_of_1956.

    All in all, Hungary has a special place in European history. There remains in Hungary a sense of loss that the Treaty of Trianon nearly 120 years ago, created.
    Last edited by Dreamwoven; 02-17-2017 at 08:15 AM.

  7. #22
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    Another book that I have now read twice is The Invisible Bridge by Julie Orringer (Vintage Books, 2011). It reminded me how much of the Hungarian language I remember from my childhood. The book is long, some 750 pages, but I love the way the Budapest railway stations are named: Keleti (dawn), and Nyugati (sunset or resting), and a street called "Forget-me-not". Set in the late 1930s and early 1940s mainly in Paris and Hungary it describes very well the trials and tribulations of her Jewish relatives. She was helped in writing it by her grand uncle and aunt. Its the kind of book that I will return to read again.

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