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Thread: From My Bookshelves

  1. #106
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    The third book by Elly Griffiths The Chalk Pit, has a section on Underground Societies, people who live in some of our most affluent cities, but they are driven to live below the earth. People who - for whatever reason - aren't welcome on the surface - homeless people, the addicts, HIV-positive. There are subterranean communities all over the world - in catacombs, sewers and abandoned metros. The tunnel people in Las Vegas, the Empire of the Dead in Paris, the Rat Tribe in Beijing. A lot of them are proper societies with electricity and phone lines - even churches and restaurants sometimes. The Rat Tribe in Beijing are mostly migrant workers, some of them brought in to build for the Olympics (The Chalk Pit, p.197).

  2. #107
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    I have another book on Stonehaven by Archibald Watt "Highways and Byways Round Stonehaven". Kerstin and I went to Stonehaven and the ruins of Dunnottar Castle just before going to Minnesota where we spent a year. The book is a fascinating history of the region and brings back fine memories of Kincardineshire.

  3. #108
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    Charles H. Hapgood Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings: evidence of advanced civilisations in the Ice Age. I first read this book in 1966, but bought my own copy in 2014. My parents lived in Northwest London in 1966, and I went to the University library in the West End, placing orders to consult old Portolano maps so I should have them available on the day.

    Since then I have kept up my interest in old maps.

  4. #109
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    Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings depicts the Atlantic Ocean with Europe and North Africa on the East and the Americas on the west (from Cuba down to Antarctica). The southern tip of South America is connected to Antarctica by a land bridge, and there is no evidence of ice. The seas show illustrations of sailing ships. This map was found in Constantinople after its fall to the Ottoman turks in 1453, and the map is known as the Piri Re'is Map: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piri_Reis_map.

  5. #110
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    It is believed that Christopher Columbus may have in part based his judgement of the veracity of the reality of the Americas on this map.

  6. #111
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    Portolan charts are known for their accuracy.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portolan_chart

    "Portolan or portulan charts are navigational maps based on compass directions and estimated distances observed by the pilots at sea. They were first made in the 13th century in Italy, and later in Spain and Portugal, with later 15th and 16th century charts noted for their cartographic accuracy.[1] With the advent of widespread competition among seagoing nations during the Age of Discovery, Portugal and Spain considered such maps to be state secrets. The English and Dutch, relative newcomers, found the description of Atlantic and Indian coastlines extremely valuable for their raiding, and later trading, ships. The word portolan comes from the Italian adjective portolano, meaning "related to ports or harbors", or "a collection of sailing directions".[1]"

  7. #112
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dreamwoven View Post
    Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings depicts the Atlantic Ocean with Europe and North Africa on the East and the Americas on the west (from Cuba down to Antarctica). The southern tip of South America is connected to Antarctica by a land bridge, and there is no evidence of ice. The seas show illustrations of sailing ships. This map was found in Constantinople after its fall to the Ottoman turks in 1453, and the map is known as the Piri Re'is Map: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piri_Reis_map.
    If I read it rightly there is the characteristic outline of the coast of Brazil. And that is phantastic because Brazil was officially discovered
    in 1500, only thirteen years before.
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

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