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Thread: Why does free verse count as verse?

  1. #61
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCamilo View Post
    My computer produces literature everyday
    Come on, JC, you know what I mean!
    Your computer doesnīt produce anything on its own accord.
    You (or whoever uses your PC for that purpose) produces literature on your computer as you would do it on an typewriter or paper in other times.
    Else we would be at the starting point of this argument again.
    "You can always find something better than death."
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  2. #62
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    "I was thinking today about what the OP was really saying about free verse when asking if it counted as verse. When I read what he/she wrote I think it might have something to do with verbal abuse that I mentioned in an earlier post to this thread. I would rethink the question like this: Is free verse verbal abuse?"
    I donīt think so, Yes/No. I reread the post, it seems to be about of the form of the verse.
    https://literarydevices.net/free-verse/
    Well, unless everybody is joking today.
    "You can always find something better than death."
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  3. #63
    Maybe YesNo's Avatar
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    On the "literal" level, the OP is asking a question about form as you say. Here's the OP:

    Quote Originally Posted by Leopard View Post
    I'm rather ignorant when it comes to poetry so this is likely a stupid question, but why is free verse considered verse? Isn't verse distinguished from prose by its adherence to a meter and/or rhyme scheme? It seems to me like you can just take any random bit of prose, arrange it into lines, and call it free verse.
    Note the qualifications "I'm rather ignorant" and "this is likely a stupid question". I read that as irony. Then note "you can just take any random bit of prose". The irony is turning into sarcasm with the "any random" part, but not on the surface, not literally. I agree that Leopard probably doesn't see free verse as "verbal abuse", but he probably hasn't thought of it as such.

    Regardless, here is a good example of two people reading the same text and creating different meanings in the process. And if Leopard joined the discussion he might recreate a third meaning to what he wrote. Even my assumption that Leopard is a "he" is assigning meaning to some text that is not there. I can see why early 20th century mathematicians did not want human involvement in mathematics.
    Last edited by YesNo; 02-19-2017 at 04:53 PM.

  4. #64
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    You may be right, Yes/No. In fact I donīt know the OP, so I canīt say if there is any irony.
    When I am not sure of the writers intention I always make a point of taking the text literally.
    The most that can happen is that the writer will take me for ingenuous or stupid, and I think I can survive that coming from an avatar. On the other hand, if I atribute an irony that is not there I may create an unnecessary misunderstanding.
    As an internet aquaintance of mine says, written irony is so much more difficult to detect than the verbal.
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

  5. #65
    Maybe YesNo's Avatar
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    I agree that written irony is difficult to detect. With the verbal you can see the person. I suspect facial expression adds a lot to the communication.

  6. #66
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    It sure does. Well, maybe the OP will state his intention - or not.
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

  7. #67
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    You may be confusing pentameter with verse. Poetry is sometimes written inside a regimented structure, example: Shakespeare wrote predominantly I Iambic Pentameter. Each line has 5 feet/10syllables however you prefer to count it. There's also terza-rima, quatrain, sestina, etc Each has specific rules that govern the structure. Verse poetry is poetry that has both a consistent meter and a rhyme scheme. Blank verse is poetry based on unrhymed lines and a definite meter, usually of iambic pentameter. Both blank verse and free verse are free from rhyme scheme. Hope that helps.

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