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Thread: Texts About Walls

  1. #1
    Registered User BFrank's Avatar
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    Texts About Walls

    Hello Everyone,
    I am currently putting together a one-semester course, and I need a little help. The goal fo the course is to teach students to write meaningfully about literature with a focus on the rhetorical moves and research skills essential to the critical analysis. The topic/focus of the course is "walls" and how they affect relationships. So far, I have the following texts:

    “Mending Wall” Frost
    The Wall Pink Floyd
    “The Wall” Sartre
    “Bartleby: A Tale of Wall Street” Melville
    “The Yellow Wallpaper” Gilman
    “The Great Wall of China” Kafka
    The Secret Garden Burnett
    “The Cask of Amontillado” Poe
    “In the Cage” Henry James
    The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Haddon
    The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
    Bauby
    The Reason I Jump: One Boy's Voice from the Silence of Autism
    Higshida

    I also have a cache of theory and criticism to accompany the literature.

    Do you have any suggestions? The ideal addition would be a longer canonical text that lends itself to contemporary criticism. Also, any poetry suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!
    Barry
    Last edited by BFrank; 11-09-2016 at 05:56 PM.

  2. #2
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    Two novels about the Wall of Berlin:
    https://www.amazon.com/They-Divided-.../dp/0776607871 or "The divided Wall" (the classic novel by Christa Wolff)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Am_k%C...er_Sonnenallee
    Exile on the Shorter End of Sun Avenue: An Analysis of Thomas Brussig’s novel Am kürzeren Ende der Sonnenallee" (2015) Unfortunately I didn´t find the novel in English
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

  3. #3
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    I've never read it, but there is The Wall, a novel by John Hersey about the Warsaw ghetto. There is also the story of Pyramus and Thisbe from Ovid's Metamorphosis, and of course Shakespeare's hilarious adaptation of it in A Midsummer Night's Dream.
    Last edited by Pompey Bum; 11-10-2016 at 01:26 PM.

  4. #4
    Internal nebulae TheFifthElement's Avatar
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    The Wall (Die Wand) by Marlen Haushofer would be perfect for your course. A book which is a lot less well known than it should be.
    Want to know what I think about books? Check out https://biisbooks.wordpress.com/

  5. #5
    Registered User mona amon's Avatar
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    I suggest two 19th century books - Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens. While all his other books have some reference to the Marshalsea prison in which his father was jailed for debt, this is THE prison book with almost all the major characters suffering imprisonment in some way or other. It opens with the two 'caged birds' John Baptist and Blandois. The whole Dorrit family is actually in the Marshalsea, and Arthur Clenham ends up there for a while. Mrs Clenham is in a prison of her own making, confined to her room, and gets Arthur clenham's real mother imprisoned for madness. Tattycoram escapes from, and then returns to her prison with the Meagles, and so on.

    The other is Villette by Charlotte Bronte. Viewed from a certain perspective it is all about women enclosed by walls - the sick room, the girls' school, the convent, the forbidden walled garden which is an enclosure within the enclosure of the school, and so on.
    Exit, pursued by a bear.

  6. #6
    Registered User prendrelemick's Avatar
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    There is a wall in Game of thrones I believe. A supposed dividing line between civilisation and barbarism.

    Also Pyramus and Thisbe from classical times.
    ay up

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    Quote Originally Posted by prendrelemick View Post
    Also Pyramus and Thisbe from classical times.
    Good thinking, Prend. Imitation is the sincerest form of plagiarism.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pompey Bum View Post
    There is also the story of Pyramus and Thisbe from Ovid's Metamorphosis, and of course Shakespeare's hilarious adaptation of it in A Midsummer Night's Dream.

  8. #8
    Registered User BFrank's Avatar
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    Wow! Thank you everyone for the smart and helpful responses. This is very helpful!

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    Registered User kev67's Avatar
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    The book I am reading currently, We by Yevgeny Zamyatin, has a wall in it: the Green Wall, which the inhabitants of the One State never cross.
    According to Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence once said that Balzac was 'a gigantic dwarf', and in a sense the same is true of Dickens.
    Charles Dickens, by George Orwell

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