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Thread: I know, let's list the books we haven't read

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackson Richardson View Post
    Just thought of another influential classic that I'm not going to bother with, Rabelais' Gargantua and Pantagruel. I know the wonderful Canadian novelist, Robertson Davies, thought highly of it, but I don't think it's my kind of book.

    Neither, I suspect, is Lolita.
    I think of reading it sometimes, but it would take an awfully long time. Maybe if I broke my leg or something. Speaking of really early novels, JR, did you ever read Simplicius Simplicissimus? That looks like it might be fun, too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Danik 2016 View Post
    I donīt recomend Lolita to anyone. I found it boring.
    My blushes, Danik! First Molly Bloom's dream and now this? I am an innocent beside you, sir!

  3. #33
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    We all have our innocent sides, PB!
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

  4. #34
    Registered User Jackson Richardson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pompey Bum View Post
    did you ever read Simplicius Simplicissimus? That looks like it might be fun, too.
    I have to say I wasn't aware of Simplicissimus until you mentioned it. You bowled me a googly - a reference prendrelmick as a Yorkshireman will understand.

    Thinking of German classics, there's Goethe's Faust. Although I understand generally regarded as up there with Dante in importance, it is not a work I hear much about in the English speaking world. There are annual translations of the Commedia, but hardly any I know about of Faust.

    I don't really like reading poetry in translation - I am bound to miss one of the most important elements. Unless I come accross a brilliant translation, I'll give it a miss. Also The Sorrows of Young Werther.
    Previously JonathanB

    The more I read, the more I shall covet to read. Robert Burton The Anatomy of Melancholy Partion3, Section 1, Member 1, Subsection 1

  5. #35
    Registered User Clopin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pompey Bum View Post
    I think of reading it sometimes, but it would take an awfully long time. Maybe if I broke my leg or something. Speaking of really early novels, JR, did you ever read Simplicius Simplicissimus? That looks like it might be fun, too.
    Lolita's excellent. I think both of you would enjoy it quite a bit.
    So with the courage of a clown, or a cur, or a kite jerkin tight at it's tether

  6. #36
    Registered User prendrelemick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackson Richardson View Post
    - a reference prendrelmick as a Yorkshireman will understand.

    [/I]
    An off break disguised as a leg break - or is it the other way round? (I'm in the corridor of uncertainty)
    ay up

  7. #37
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    Envious PB? What I am envious of is that someone wants to sell you brides! Be careful and don't purchase a bum steer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ennison View Post
    Envious PB? What I am envious of is that someone wants to sell you brides! Be careful and don't purchase a bum steer.
    It's muslima.com, if you're interested. Before that it was "Date a Ukranian girl!" (apparently the default). And whenever I go to Taiwan, it's suddenly "Hot Asian babes want to meet you!" I can sympathize. I mean, it gets damn hot in Taiwan, but it's not like I can help the poor things. Besides I'm loyal to my wife, even though she doesn't want me to drive anymore. She says she won't have a bum steer. ba-DUM!
    Last edited by Pompey Bum; 10-25-2016 at 10:23 AM.

  9. #39
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    Since I just started reading classic books, my list is far fuller of the more obvious classics than everyone else's. That combined with the fact that I so rarely read books that I was assigned in school (and yes, I was an English major).

    King James New Testament (did read the old one)
    All of Shakespeare
    The Divine Comedy
    Paradise Lost
    Any Dickens other than Christmas Carol
    Never finished War and Peace, although I read a lot/Anna Karenina
    Aeneid
    Don Quixote
    Ulysses
    Canterbury Tales
    In Search of Lost Time
    Brothers Karamazov/Crime & Punishment
    Really any poetry

    I am reading Moby-Dick now, though!

  10. #40
    Registered User Red Terror's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Entenado View Post
    Sometimes a book comes to my mind, and I say to myself: "What? You haven't read that?" I'm going to mention a few of them, which I remember from the top of my head. I won't mention that I haven't read Paulo Coelho (I just did), or Bob Dylan (sorry couldn't resist).

    * Ulysses: I've read a few of Joyce's short stories, however I started reading English literature in English recently, so I'll get to this one a bit later maybe.
    * The Three Musketeers: I don't know why I haven't read this. It was in my dad's library, shiny and attractive, right there.
    * The Hunchback of Notre-Dame: I always thought I've read this, until I found out that I've not.
    * The Castle: Yep, I just said to myself: "What? You actually haven't read that yet?"
    * A Christmas Carol
    * Pride and Prejudice
    * Jayne Eyre
    * Wuthering Heights

    These are some that I can remember right now.
    You can skip The Three Musketeers. I read it and it is just a waste of time. There is nothing in it. It is just swashbuckling action during the siege at the Rochelle in France under Louis the XIII and his Machiavellian cleric Cardinal Richelieu.
    Read Ulysses instead and you won't have wasted your time.
    There has never been a single, great revolution in history without civil war. --- Vladimir Lenin

    There are decades when nothing happens and then there are weeks when decades happen. --- Vladimir Lenin

  11. #41
    Registered User Jackson Richardson's Avatar
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    I'm sure some readers would enjoy a swashbuckling costume action flick. But I'll take Red's word for it and give it a miss.
    Previously JonathanB

    The more I read, the more I shall covet to read. Robert Burton The Anatomy of Melancholy Partion3, Section 1, Member 1, Subsection 1

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pompey Bum View Post
    Yeah, The Mill on the Floss looked slow (and I usually don't mind slow). I think JR likes it, though.

    I wouldn't worry about Uncle Tom's Cabin, by the way. It had a huge historical impact, but as literature it wasn't much better than Daniel Koonz.
    I agree that Uncle Tom's Cabin was more of a social document than a good book, but it is also fun to read because of the number of phrases from it that have entered the English language. It doesn't give Shakespeare a run for his money in this regard, but it either employed a huge number of cliches or originated them.

    OP. HOW could you list the books you hadn't read? Myself, if I find it appealing I should have read it, by my stage of life. If it doesn't appeal I refuse to carry it around as some sort of "should have" regret.

    My one exception to this is Finnegan's Wake but I know myself well enough to be aware that I wouldn't persevere.

  13. #43
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    The Divine Conedy, The Aeneid, Jerusalem Delivered, Orlando Furioso, William Blake': prophetic books, The Prelude (Wordsworth), Plato's Republic, Utopia, Leviathan, Aristotle's Nichomaean Ethics, Longinus's On the Sublime, Edmund Burke': On the Sublime and Beautiful, Aristophanes' plays, Sophocles's plays, Ulysses, Finnegans Wake, Gravity's Rainbow, War and Peace, Anna Karenina, Madame Bovary, The Idiot, Mason & Dixon, Demons (Dostoevsky), Notes from the Underground

    And more...

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackson Richardson View Post
    I'm sure some readers would enjoy a swashbuckling costume action flick. But I'll take Red's word for it and give it a miss.
    Yea, I actually enjoy swashbuckler stories if written by someone who knows how to write, though I don't think valuing books based on their content, rather than their entertainment is an incorrect way of dealing with literature.
    - Did science finally figure out death?
    + Why?
    - I just saw a girl walking on the street, laughing out loud, and saying to her friend: "I'm literally dying."
    + *sighs*

  15. #45
    Registered User Red Terror's Avatar
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    I believe Faust Part II is the one that is supposed to be superior. I only read Part I. Part II is denser and richer and you have to have a thorough knowledge of Greek mythology to understand it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jackson Richardson View Post
    I have to say I wasn't aware of Simplicissimus until you mentioned it. You bowled me a googly - a reference prendrelmick as a Yorkshireman will understand.

    Thinking of German classics, there's Goethe's Faust. Although I understand generally regarded as up there with Dante in importance, it is not a work I hear much about in the English speaking world. There are annual translations of the Commedia, but hardly any I know about of Faust.

    I don't really like reading poetry in translation - I am bound to miss one of the most important elements. Unless I come accross a brilliant translation, I'll give it a miss. Also The Sorrows of Young Werther.
    There has never been a single, great revolution in history without civil war. --- Vladimir Lenin

    There are decades when nothing happens and then there are weeks when decades happen. --- Vladimir Lenin

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