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Thread: The Damned Human Race

  1. #16
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Pompey Bum;1326601]Failed to keep up? They're running in the opposite direction. If you or I were drowning in a lake and someone swam from shore to save us, our instinct would be to shove his or her head underwater in an absurd attempt to save ourselves. Only by driving back our instinctive mind could we hope to be saved. It is possible, but it is not what we evolved to do. We evolved to kill even our would-be saviors.=QUOTE]

    I agree and Im going to sign up to POVFPWWSU if I manage a correct spelling of it.
    Some quoting problem.
    Last edited by Danik 2016; 09-10-2016 at 03:57 PM.
    "You can always find something better than death."
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  2. #17
    Registered User DATo's Avatar
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    Thanks to all who responded to this thread. I had no idea when I submitted it that it would draw so much interest.

    1) Pompey Bum is quite correct. There is no year 0. An obvious gaff for which I have no excuse. It should have been "year 1".

    2) AuntShecky - Mark Twain did indeed write a story titled, The Damned Human Race. It was included in a collection of short stories titled, Letters From The Earth. This is obviously a DIFFERENT Damned Human Race essay. Warner Brothers once threatened to sue over the production of the Marx Brothers film, A Night In Casablanca because of the word "Casablanca" - the name of their more famous movie. Groucho shot off a letter threatening to counter sue because the Marx Brothers had been on the earth longer than Warner Brothers and by the logic of the original complaint Warner Brothers was also in violation of copyright for using the word "Brothers". (Warner Brothers withdrew the demand that they change the title.) *LOL*

    3) We are Cro-Magnon, not Neanderthal. Sorry PeterL. It has been determined that there is, at most, only 2% Neanderthal (technically a different species) genes in the current human genome.

    4) YesNo - How do I know we landed men on the moon? Well, because the government told me we did. Of course the government has lied to me about so many things in the past that now I'm not so sure. ~~~~~~ A Mystery ~~~~~~~~

  3. #18
    Voice of Chaos & Anarchy
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    Quote Originally Posted by DATo View Post

    3) We are Cro-Magnon, not Neanderthal. Sorry PeterL. It has been determined that there is, at most, only 2% Neanderthal (technically a different species) genes in the current human genome.
    You may be a Cro-Magnon, but the rest of humans are not, and Neanderthals certainly were not a separate species. You might want to do some reading in the subject.

  4. #19
    Registered User DATo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterL View Post
    You may be a Cro-Magnon, but the rest of humans are not, and Neanderthals certainly were not a separate species. You might want to do some reading in the subject.
    Greetings PeterL !

    It is so exciting to meet a self-proclaimed Neanderthal, but of course you are wrong so stop running about claiming to be one - you're frightening the children! Neanderthals share 99.7% of their DNA with modern man, chimpanzees share 99% of their DNA with modern man; therefore, there is a .3% difference in our shared DNA with Neanderthals thus making them a separate species.

    I refer you to the following article: http://phys.org/news/2014-11-neander...rn-humans.html Read the opening paragraph slowly and carefully.

    Quod Erat Demonstrandum!

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    I just know this is going to end with a clubbing--which rather proves DATo's original point.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pompey Bum View Post
    I just know this is going to end with a clubbing--which rather proves DATo's original point.
    Which club is who going to join?

    There seems to be a general lack of understanding of some of the basic vocabulary of biology. Many people don't understand what makes species species, even though the definition is very simple and unambiguous.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterL View Post
    Which club is who going to join?

    There seems to be a general lack of understanding of some of the basic vocabulary of biology. Many people don't understand what makes species species, even though the definition is very simple and unambiguous.
    No, I meant you two were bound to go drinking up and down Newbury Street some night.

    As I said, I don't really have a dog in this race. But I'll take the species challenge just the same. Like any decent American boy, I learned about sex not on the streets but in barns--in my case those on my great uncle's farm in deepest, darkest Iowa. According to that trusted male mentor, a species was a group of organisms that could produce fertile offspring, and if they couldn't (and this is direct quote) they were "useless as balls on a mule."

    Now my good uncle knew little of DNA science, but I'm betting the daily double here is "What is interbreeding, Peter?" Modern humans seem to have at least some DNA, and didn't there from holding hands. So we must be the same species. That was going to be your argument, right?

    If so, maybe you're right. King Philip came over for gratuitous sodomy, as the old memory device goes. So yes, same species. Neanderthals would probably have been a subspecies of Homo sapiens, though, and as we agreed before, modern humans are not Neanderthals.

    On the other hand, maybe you are wrong. I found 2012 article about the Cambridge University study I was remembering, which casts doubt on the interbreeding hypothesis. If it is correct, there is little reason to think that Neanderthals were a kind of Homo sapiens at all.

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/...-interbreeding

    "When scientists discovered a few years ago that modern humans shared swaths of DNA with long-extinct Neanderthals, their best explanation was that at some point the two species must have interbred.

    "Now a study by scientists at the University of Cambridge has questioned this conclusion, hypothesising instead that the DNA overlap is a remnant of a common ancestor of both Neanderthals and modern humans...

    [Researcher] Andrea Manica said the analysis had over-estimated the amount of shared DNA between Neanderthals and humans that could be explained by interbreeding. The analysis had not taken into account the genetic variation already present between different populations of the ancestors of modern humans in Africa...

    "About 350,000 years ago, the European and African ranges of this last common ancestor became separate: the European range would later evolve into Neanderthals and the African range into anatomically modern humans, who left the continent 70,000 years ago to cover the world."

    The idea receives some (circumstantial) support from archaeology, which shows a thriving Magdalenian (Cro-Magnon) culture existing separately from stressed and marginalized Neanderthal neighbors. The former had a highly specialized tool technology, including ivory needles for making snugly fitting clothes. Needles have never been found at Neanderthal sites; presumably they were wearing clothes (they survived two nasty ice ages), but they may have been merely tying hides together. Near the end, when they were sharing Europe with the Magdalenians, there is evidence for intra-Neanderthal cannibalism, suggesting desperation and starvation while the Magdalenians were thriving. It is even possible that disappearance of the Neanderthals was facilitated by mad cow disease spread by the cannibalism. My source for all this information is a friend who teaches physical anthropology at the University of Connecticut.

    Now read my lips: I don't care which way it happened. But I do assert my original position that controversies continue to exist about whether Neanderthals and Homo sapiens should be considered members of the same species. It is not enough to say that those who disagree with you have simply not done enough research or don't understand the terms.

    And as for me, I'm not playing. I saw more than enough in the dark barns of my Iowa summers. Species be damned. In the immortal words of Mr Jinx (of Pixie and Dixie fame): "I hate species to pecies."
    Last edited by Pompey Bum; 09-19-2016 at 08:45 AM.

  8. #23
    MANICHAEAN MANICHAEAN's Avatar
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    Interesting thread. Not quite sure if I'm back to DATo's original point, or if I'm shooting further off the subject at an obtuse angle; but we are are I think comparing primitive urges and their possible eroding by modern life?

    On that one I'm in two minds.

    I was taught to work hard; firstly to put bread on the table, support family, then as a bonus, to get the extra's. Have the extras taken over? Do I really need the mansion in the Home Counties, the Bentley and the trophy wife? Not really. Life is more simple than that.

    When growing up in immediate post war London, the father was the breadwinner, the mother was for the family, needs and values were simple, bonds were close, and we had a happy childhood. No TV, car, fridge, I-pads, mobile phones, yellow lines, central heating, double glazing or cyber sex.

    And yet having spent a life time making money, and indulging to a limiting extent; all it does is to take away any worries of financial insecurity. The pleasures are still simple. If I'm hungry I eat, thirsty I drink, tired I sleep; in a crisis I focus more, still appreciate good looking women and sigh contentedly after a good bowel movement.

    Fight or flee? Sorry I need the knee replacements first!

  9. #24
    Voice of Chaos & Anarchy
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    1. Biology A group of closely related organisms that are very similar to each other and are usually capable of interbreeding and producing fertile offspring. The species is the fundamental category of taxonomic classification, ranking below a genus or subgenus.
    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Species+(biology)

    noun, singular or plural: species
    (1) (taxonomy) The lowest taxonomic rank, and the most basic unit or category of biological classification.
    (2) (taxonomy) An individual belonging to a group of organisms (or the entire group itself) having common characteristics and (usually) are capable of mating with one another to produce fertile offspring. Failing that (for example the Liger) It has to be ecologically and recognisably the same.

    Supplement
    In the hierarchy of biological classification, it is the lowest taxonomic rank and is considered as the most basic unit of classification. Genus is the taxonomic rank above the species and may contain one of more species. In order to be considered into a species rank, the group of organisms wherein two of its members are capable of reproducing fertile offspring (especially through sexual reproduction). There are certain groups though that can still be further subdivided into subgroups (i.e. subspecies, such as varieties, formae, etc.).
    http://www.biology-online.org/dictionary/Species

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by MANICHAEAN View Post
    Interesting thread. Not quite sure if I'm back to DATo's original point, or if I'm shooting further off the subject at an obtuse angle; but we are are I think comparing primitive urges and their possible eroding by modern life?

    On that one I'm in two minds.

    I was taught to work hard; firstly to put bread on the table, support family, then as a bonus, to get the extra's. Have the extras taken over? Do I really need the mansion in the Home Counties, the Bentley and the trophy wife? Not really. Life is more simple than that.

    When growing up in immediate post war London, the father was the breadwinner, the mother was for the family, needs and values were simple, bonds were close, and we had a happy childhood. No TV, car, fridge, I-pads, mobile phones, yellow lines, central heating, double glazing or cyber sex.

    And yet having spent a life time making money, and indulging to a limiting extent; all it does is to take away any worries of financial insecurity. The pleasures are still simple. If I'm hungry I eat, thirsty I drink, tired I sleep; in a crisis I focus more, still appreciate good looking women and sigh contentedly after a good bowel movement.

    Fight or flee? Sorry I need the knee replacements first!
    Being of two minds is an interesting way to put it. We are all of (at least) two minds, and one is the instinctive--the mind stupid and brutal enough to drown a lifeguard who is trying to save us; the mind that can be tricked into thinking that sex with a condom or even masturbation is going to make babies; the mind that tells you during a nightclub fire to throw yourself into the mass of idiots plugging the exit doorway, who are all going to burn alive, when calmly organizing a line/queue would save everyone's life.

    What you are (mostly) talking about is a thin veneer or civilization. It is not that primitive instincts are "eroding modern life," but that human beings ARE (among other things) those primitive instincts and civilized life is small and (probably) ephemeral in comparison. Something like civilization (which was and still is a pretty brutal business) has existed in places for seven or eight thousand years. By comparison, the sapiens species has existed for about 200,000 years, and the Homo genus for more than 2,000,000. As far as we can tell, life was short and brutal. Natural selection had its hands full.

    There is a brief prologue to the graphic novel Maus, based on the author's father's recollections of being in hiding from the Nazi's before being sent to Auschwitz. The author (as a little boy) has been shoved down, ridiculed, and ditched by his friends. When his father finds him crying, he asks him what has happened. After hearing the story, his father responds: "Friends? Your friends? If you lock them together in a room with no food for a week, then you could see what it is, friends."

    This is the onion skin on which we all walk all the time.
    Last edited by Pompey Bum; 09-19-2016 at 10:55 AM.

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