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Thread: Poetry Reviews and Analyses from the Reconstruction Era

  1. #16
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    Mia M

    “Can you blame me that I did not see beneath his burning kiss?”
    “A Double Standard” by Frances Ellen Watkins Harper is a poem written about love, using engaging and captivating language to express deep emotions as a story is being unfolded.
    To begin with, the language used shows that the poem was about love. “Do you blame me that I loved him” was written in the first and second stanzas. The girl in the story was charmed by a man. Although the poem is not about the type of love that includes bliss and joy, it still has such power that has an emotional effect on the audience. Her love was shattered into millions of pieces. Her heart was like a glass cup that was thrown on the ground by someone else who blamed her.
    A story is unfolded while taking in the fascinating words of this poem. The girl in the story fell so desperately in love with a man who was not capable of loving her and instead, revealed his dark secrets. Now she is left alone, and she is blamed. Her emotions are all twisted together: fury, sorrow, and misery. The man who ripped her heart is honored by others who do not see what kind of person he truly is. She was so deeply in love she could not see “beneath his burning kiss.”
    Multiple messages can stick out to the readers differently. The girl in the poem could not see his evil because she was blinded by love. In result, he left her broken and alone. She feels as though the blame should be on him instead of her, for making her the way she is now. All of the love she felt towards him was like a mask hiding an awful scar. She was not careful of who she fell in love with.
    The poem expressed many miserable emotions powerfully, showing the pain and heartbreak the girl felt. She was left heartbroken by a man she mistakenly loved, which resulted with others blaming her, though she feels that he was the one that sinned, but all of that happiness lasted for a little bit, and left her alone.

  2. #17
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    J.r. S.

    Poem analysis JR S

    The Reckoning
    The poem “As I walk these broad majestic days” uses many meanings and in the paper, I will be breaking down some stanzas. Some language used in the poem is similes, metaphors and symbolism which makes you feel like you’re in the poem.
    The poem Walt Whitman writes, he uses many symbolisms. “I see the ship. The vast factories with their foreman and workmen”. This means even if your confined to the cell we call life, you can break free and sail the boat of memory and into the sunset of the future.
    Secondly, the poem also uses many metaphors. “Then my realities; what else is as real as mine” this means he thinks he’s the only thing that’s real in his dream is himself.
    Also, to go father in depth, the poem also uses lots of personification. “Democracy rests upon us”. It means that the government now depends on us now.
    The moral of the story is to live life to the fullest. In conclusion the poem “As I walk these Broad, Majestic Breeze” uses many language to make you feel as if you’re in the poem.

  3. #18
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    Ty

    Change for the Better
    “For we support all, fuse all, After the rest is done and gone, we remain; There is final reliance but upon us; Democracy rests finally upon us (I my brethren begin it) And our visions sweep through eternity. In “As I Walk These Broad Majestic Days”, Walt Whitman does an extraordinary job at not only showing that the world is a majestic and “eclat” place, but that it can still improve and become more advanced. But as Walt Whitman advises, only with our visions and thoughts to push the world’s creativity.
    With this poem being written during the Reconstruction Era, Whitman effortlessly combines the context of the time with future and present experiences. Using vague references to the ending of wars and vast improvements in technology and produce, Whitman makes this delightful poem relatable to readers of all tie periods and backgrounds. Although, Whitman does give some contextual background specific to the Reconstruction time period, such as: “Freedom to every slave on the face of the Earth”
    In addition, Whitman expertly uses the fundamental poetic techniques to draw you in and keep you suspended and on the waiting for more. Using similes and metaphors he creates understandable analogies so the reader can easily relate; while also using assonance and symbolism to create a soothing and rhythmic effect. Also as the reader continues down the page, Whitman decisively changes the tone throughout the poem and keep you guessing and on edge throughout the entire poem.
    In the end, Whitman is only trying to get only one point across, your visions are what make our world better. Throughout the last couple stanzas, Whitman clearly states or implies that our thoughts a\re the main push behind the shove to make our world better. But it all boils down to the fact that we must enforce our thoughts to help us change to become extraordinary and become the best version of what the world can be. Without a doubt, this poem install in you the sense of determination and will to do your part in making our world amazing.

  4. #19
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    Vicktoria P

    The beautiful city in the sea

    You will go to through the meadows to the beautiful sea that’s in the city and when you want to leave the sea you will go back through the meadows and through the fields. You can see palesecse, towers, the sea, spires up kingly halls, sculptured ivy, and stone flowers.
    You will see what the waves and the wind did to the forgotten city beneath the sea. The wind and the sea have built beautiful shrines, now that’s how strong the wind is and the sea is to form all of those things like that. Reading this poem I thought and imagined all of those things in the poem. The palaces and walls, ivy and stone flowers all were forgotten from the sea. The wind and water form many things. That’s how strong the wind and the sea are. It sounds like the author is desiring a city, a grave yard, and a creepy surroundings beneath the sea. Where the good, the bad, the worst, and the best have gone to their eternal rest. The wind and the waves make objects under the sea look like a city of grave yards. Up the domes up the kingly halls up many a marvelous shrine. Using my imagination objects resemble buildings in the city. It makes you wonder what real cities in the past where covered by the sea and forgotten. Palaces, towers, sculptured ivy, spires, kingly halls, and grave yards where all forgotten covered up by the sea.

  5. #20
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    Victoria P

    “A little feather of snow-white smoke, and we knew that the iron ship of our foes, was steadily steering its course,” Longfellow creates an incredible environment in the depths of imagination and hardship. “The Cumberland” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow is an exceptional piece of well-developed literature.
    To begin, the symbolism emphasizes the importance of the Reconstruction Era. From a “cannons breath”, to a small yet, empowering flag of a nation. The definition of happiness and despair is clear in Longfellow’s engaging poem. Overall, symbolism is a key element to any sort of writing. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow creates an enlightening passage.
    Yet, symbolism is a part of a team and cannot stand alone. Figurative language has always got its back. The Figurative language is very powerful in Longfellow’s writing. This doesn’t simply elude form our brains if it is puissant. “The Cumberland” has the most eminent ways of writing never capable to be emulate. For instance, “Was a whisper of a prayer” or “From each iron scale of a monster’s hide”.
    Another significant, component of a team is the base or the goalie. The goalie has suited up for battle. The tone/voice of the poem. This is a praised element of any reader or writer. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, has done an exceptional job in “The Cumberland” by illuminating empowering emotions and highlighting interpreted meanings that may seem to be hiding.
    In conclusion, poetry is like a sugar cookie. If u don’t include all of the ingredient will crumble. “The Cumberland” does not have to worry about that Henry Wadsworth Longfellow has done a remarkable job at creating a vivid Picasso, in our minds. He does a great job at making the audience want to continue reading the master piece.

  6. #21
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    Zachary S 1st Period

    Emotions

    Life is a trail with emotions in the way. In the poem To William Lloyd Garrison the author uses a verity of emotions to persuade the reader to feel the pain that they are feeling. Some of the emotions the author used were death, fear, and strength. This poem reaches your heart and your heart with powerful lines, and vocabulary such as “Until the dead in sin shall hear, the fetter link be broken.”
    And “the cloud of human ill.” The first quote means that the people that have past shall hear on earth until the link that they use to hear is broken .And the second quote means the cloud of death.
    Going off of, fear was the stronger note in this poem because it gave beneficial use of imagery, it paints a picture in your head, and some of the lines that pick up that paint brush and paint that picture are “

  7. #22
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    Kalani

    “Leave me not a wretch confined/ Altogether lama and blind/ Unto gross despair consigned/ Forever!” “The Slave’s Complaint” by George Moses Horton (Published 1829) thoroughly elucidates a recurrent slave viewpoint while applying figurative language, such as Apostrophe, Personification, and Repetition.
    The poet uses Apostrophe throughout the poem to deepen the message. The first stanza of the poem used Apostrophe to snag the reader’s attention: “Am I sadly cast aside/ On misfortune’s rugged tide/ Will the world my pains deride/ Forever?” The use of this technique assists the poet by accessing the reader’s right side of the brain, the emotional side, to trigger a finer relationship with the slave view. Personification, like Apostrophe, is also a major figurative language in this poem. It has been incorporated throughout the writing to show that raw, hopeful (or hopeless) side of the slave point of view. “And all pleasure take its flight,” “Worst of all, must hope grow dim?/ And withhold her cheering beam?” an “Something still my heart surveys/ Groping through this dreary maze/ Is it Hope? – they burn and blaze/ Forever!” are all example of Personification used in the poem. Lastly, Repetition is used in the material. At the end of each stanza, the word “Finally” is placed on its own line. Based on the punctuation that follows (Question mark, Exclamation mark, Colon), I have interpreted that “Finally” shows the mental growth of the narrator. I believe that “Finally” displays the growth of the narrator due to the punctuation at each stanza: Stanzas one and two have question marks, stanzas three-through-five and seven have exclamation points, and stanza six has a colon. “Far beyond my feeble sight/ Forever?” “Condescend to be my guide/ Forever:” and “Bid me from servitude ascend/ Forever!” shows the narrators development throughout the poem.
    This poem teaches us that hope can be found in the bleakest situations: You just have to look. With Horton’s use of Apostrophe, Personification, and Repetition, he comforts us by stating that there will always be hope for those who need it.

  8. #23
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    Kaitlyn B

    Dark Days Now Gone
    By: Kaitlyn B(Period 3)

    “For the war, the struggle of blood finish’d, wherein, O, terrific ideal!” As I Walk These Broad Majestic Days” By Walt Whitman, this poet uses incredible imagery to ignite our inner creativity, symbolism to keep the readers digging deeper into the true meaning of this poem, and even throws in a life lesson that should be carried around by everyone!

    To begin with, the poets imagery can lead us to a plethora of thoughts that we never knew could come to mind just by the right play on word choice! For example, line seventeen states that, “Like a grand procession, to music of distant bugles, pouring, triumphantly moving—and grander heaving in sight.” At first that probably isn’t the easiest to understand, but if you pick it apart piece by piece you realize, the character is standing aside watching society go on without him and all he can do is simply acknowledge everything hustling by throughout his life. Another illustration of this is presented in line twenty, “Libertad, and the divine average—Freedom to every slave on the face of the earth!” This could be interpreted in several ways, such as his reality involving freedom and how all humans wanted was to be free of captivity. This poem allows you to create your own visions of this journey Walt takes us on!

    Going off of that, this dramatist includes symbolism all throughout this poem that opens us up to explore further than we ever expected to discover with just one creation of words! For instance, in line one, “As I walk these broad, majestic days of peace…” this simple nine word sentence can touch ones soul more than they intended! This quote from the poem shows that good days will come and although we will surface struggles every day we must look ahead for our own “majestic days of peace!” Likewise, in line twenty-five, it’s stated, “And our visions sweep through eternity.” This term could be easily understood as just a way to look at something, but if you think a little harder about it you could imagine that it’s more intense meaning is that there will always be something further that we want in life but at the end of the day we learn to live with what we have and allow these expectations to motivate us into working harder at our life goals. This poet displays symbolism and forces you to deal with your own thoughts and realize what this poem really means to you!

    In addition, Walt Whitman sends across a life changing message that everyone needs a little reminder of sometimes! During this poem it portrays the lesson that the harsh days won’t last forever and you can either take control of them or let them control you! Presented in line three, “Against vast odds, having gloriously won.” This is a very powerful line as it demonstrates; you will never have everybody on your side, but don’t let that keep you from succeeding in your own dreams. Building off of that, line five represents, “Perhaps to engage in time in still more dreadful contests, dangers…” once again this line could be confusing at first glance but after putting a little more thought in it, you could realize there is an infinite of possibilities coming from the wording in this poem! One interpretation could be that if you really want the glory of accomplishing something you may have to go through some fire. Similar to that, in life every day we come across dilemmas that force us to decide what’s worth fighting for!

    At the end of the day the most you can do is find beauty in every little thing; even if the world seems to be crashing down around you, just like the character in this poem; you have to rise above it and know it will all be worth it! There’s always more to life than the obvious meaning of things, Walt Whitman does an extraordinary job opening our hearts to realizing everything may not be what it seems but we can make the most out of anything thrown our way! The character presented in this poem teaches us a great life lesson and makes us recognize we can take charge in our life and not be left alone in society’s shadows!

  9. #24
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    Abbie C

    A Horses Essence

    “There is no elevator to success; you have to take the stairs” Author Unknown. Long stairs hurt to walk up, and elevators don’t, you get to the same destination. However, if you take an elevator, you won’t be prepared for what is waiting at the top. This is an extremely cliché phrase, but in many ways it ties into the poem very well, as a slave he was whipped, worked beyond what people should work and forced to carry out the commands of anyone at any time. If none of the past slaves were salves, the reconstruction wouldn’t happen and our country would still be in ruins. In the poem Death of an Old Carriage Horse George Moses Horton expresses his thought provoking theme through prime vocabulary and symbolism.

    Horton articulates his point by using a cruel driver and a weary work horse. The author illustrates his desolate life as a slave by saying: “I was a harness horse constrained to travel weak or strong”. He expands on this by later adding “A cruel driver pressing on” stating that whenever he looked back he saw a man pressing on even when his bones were weak. In some peoples point of view a horse is just meant for pushing or pulling another man’s labor. In many ways a slave carries the burdens of a white southern, a driver who is only there for the ride. All his pleasure is to see the horse work and get the bounty from the horse or slave. The poem continues this by saying lines that echo what he just wrote.

    The poet expands on the poem by using compelling word choice to get his thoughts on paper. While the poem came together with other components his vocabulary pulls the tale together. When the author uses the words like, “idle” (not working) it is explaining how little the slave owner did, how it was only the slaves to make him have fame. Also “constrained” (un- natural or forced) makes the reader believe that either the work to be done could only be done that way and that the slave had to work no matter what. “Oppressing” (a burden to weigh down) is simply the southerner who makes the men and women toil without cease. Bade also easily relates to this by saying that the slave will have born, raised and died under the hand of this idle man.
    While the vocabulary adds emphasis on the writing, the theme is the glue to the whole poem. Horton's poem is all brought together by his simple theme; not everyone or everything will be handed to you on a silver platter. Some won't even let you touch it. "push along, push along is barefaced symbolism for continuing to move, but if you dig deeper than the surface you can tell it's saying that people will always thrust you forward. Not only people will push you, but they will put you through the hardest things, the poem explains this by saying "and took forks at the roughest prong". Push along is repeated in this poem 4 times stretches his point by saying that people will attack you more than once. Even though slaves are not in America it easily applies to us that you can't take the easy route or you won't get anything you made the journey for.
    For many reasons being in between a rock and a hard place can more often than not lead to more knowledge than originally perceived from that moment. George Moses Horton understands that life isn't perfect and you won't get your ideas or dreams put in actions because others free the privilege to take that away from us for themselves.

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    Zoe

    Poetry Analysis ( No title yet )

    A poet is limited to the materials he can use in his work; all his words are ones used to express his ideas and feelings. And in the poem “ A Double Standard”, the poet shines a whole new light on how a poet could wander into the depths of poetry and emotion.The poem “A Double Standard”, by Frances Ellen Watkins Harper is a piece of literature that swiftly explains the feeling of loss, betrayal, and anger from a broken heart; and express these feelings with a plethora of symbols, rhymes, and punctuation.

    The expression of her deep feelings and depression and her way of expressing it are very deep and hard to express but, Harper hit it right on the head. “Can you blame me that I did not see/Beneath his burning kiss/ The serpents wiles, or even hear/ the deadly adder hiss?” (Stanza 3)and,”...see me struggling in the depth/ then harshly push me down?” (Lines 23/24), are both examples of the emotion and feeling that Frances Harper infused into her art, gives her words whole new meanings and flavor, giving each person a new way to view her poem, and to push her audience to express themselves ; and find new emotions and to let out their creative, and meaningful abilities; and to paint the world in any colors they possibly can.

    To further enhance, Harper used a significant amount of simple, but extremely meaningful punctuation to dive even deeper into not only hers, but our feelings, and to bring out a whole new way to view loved ones and life as well. “Would you blame me if to-morrow/ The coroner should say,/ A wretched girl, outcast, forlorn,/ Has thrown her life away?” and “Yes, blame me for my downward course,/ But, oh! Remember well,/ within your home, you press the the hand/ That led me down to hell.” are two examples of strong emotion that is used to show emotion with pauses and expressions within her poem. Frances uses powerful punctuation in the previous lines from her poem “A Double Standard” to show a new emotion, a change in the view of the words and realize that she can show that she excepts the previous feelings of her poem, and realizes that she can point out that the people/person can blame her, but to remember who caused it, and what they did to build the foundation of her emotions.

  11. #26
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    Abby W

    Discover Yourself By: Abby W

    La vie est belle- Life is beautiful
    The poem,”Thine Own” by Josephine Delphine Henderson Heard, is compelling all of mankind to take action, and embrace who they really are. Heard exclaims with vigor that if you pass through life hiding from who you know you are, then life is going to hide its plentiful and bountiful gifts from you. This point is exaggerated quite effectively through lines and phrases comparing not knowing your inner self to lusterless diamonds, “music when the sound is spent”, and even something as ludicrous as “liberty behind prison bars”. Such metaphors are implemented to show the overall theme: you cannot enjoy the gift of the living, if you do not know it yourself. Heard’s tone is urging us all to take charge, and discover ourselves. Of course, the use of such devices also represents symbolism. The line “or evening skies without the stars”, for example, shows that, if we cannot see and appreciate the beauty of ourselves, then we are left with a dull, dark void.
    “Thine Own” is overall enjoyable, deep, and very understandable. The poem itself has an incredibly important message that we all know and love; the old cliché: be yourself. Our dear author leaves us with a message that could very well guide mankind through life. “To live and not be Thine Own/Like Springtime when the birds are flown;” uses the comparison between an empty, soundless springtime and a divine springtime, explosive with bird song. The use of poetic devices is exceptional, although the poem is short. Some of these poetic devices were: apostrophe, metaphor, simile, imagery, and even the hint of euphemism. Euphemism is found in the line “Rest when there’s no weariness”, as this could indicate an early death, rest as death, and weariness the experiences of life. Imagery is evident throughout the poem, and especially in the line “Music when the sound is spent”, as this line conveys sound, or even the absence of. The chaos and beauty in life can only be found by one who loves their identity. Heard is clearly trying to express the fact that being your self is beautiful, and this makes life beautiful as well.
    Josephine Delphine Henderson Heard is one who knows that the pen is mightier than the sword.”Thine Own” emanates the radiance of living out your calling; of doing what you know is right, and knowing who you are. As this poem was written in the Reconstruction Era, it is believable that she could be writing to tell people to be proud of whom they are and what they stand for, and this could very well be a message to society, as well as the individual. During conflicting times, it is important to know that, no matter what, your journey can be miraculous and spectacular, if you only know yourself.
    The plethora of symbolism (“evening skies without the stars”), hyperboles (“liberty in prison bars”), and even the use of apostrophe (”Thine” is used commonly for “your” or “you”), paints the theme quite clearly, the picture of being “Thine Own”. The importance of this statement cannot possibly be overstated, and is clearly conveyed in an inspiring manner, as Heard practically gets up on her soapbox and shouts to us all to do what is right, to claim and learn to love our identities.

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    Alayna

    The Southern Shadow
    By Alayna B

    “It’s part of what makes me Evie: I grew up in the shadow of the southern trees.” Even though Evie Shockley did not live in the Reconstruction Era, she portrayed the thoughts of those who did in “Where You Are Planted” using a plethora of symbolism to better explain the theme. The importance of appreciation is expressed through the well-crafted words and that love grows as flowers do. In line six, the poet speaks of the harsh “southern heat,” but then speaks of being grateful for the “southern trees.” She continues the harsh tone by speaking in a somewhat unforgiving voice by saying, “I’ve never forgotten…nor will I.” These few lines may be interpreted as being ungrateful, but when the perspective it came from is added into the overall equation, the poem then seems like it is written as a memory, as a reminder of the past. The theme can then be interpreted as once you appreciate something, you learn to love it.
    Not only is the theme something to be extracted from the poem, but the symbolism provides the reader with a sense of understanding. Shockley conveys the hardships of slavery by incorporating symbolism in every stanza. Shockley expressed how the North didn’t endure the hardships that the South did during the Reconstruction Era (Stanza five). It is similar to being the first to having your wisdom teeth pulled and no one understands your pain. For example, when it talks about “how little a northern girl knew about southern trees,” we can view the two young ladies as states from their respective sides, the southern trees are then interpreted as the Reconstruction Era or slavery. Stanza five isn’t the only part in “Where You Are Planted” that represents something greater than what meets the eye.
    The trees and shrubs that are mentioned in the poem each represent different emotions the author adapted to or personality traits that she took from others and made her own. For instance, “kudzu-covered trees” (line two) can be thought of a useless feeling while “crape myrtle bouquets” (line three) represents a feeling of freedom. Furthermore, “magnolia” (line nine) could represent service because it is an ornamental tree. “Poplars” (line 11) also represent the crave for freedom. Kudzu originates from Asia, also a slave export, and considered pests. As for the myrtles, they have pearly white flowers that are often referred to as clean and free. A poplar is a fast growing tree. The speedy growth represents a slave’s want growing and the north is viewed as freedom. “Where You Are Planted” teaches new generations how older generations live and that in order to grow love, you need appreciation and hardships. The symbolism and theme contribute to the overall message be providing an intriguing way to share the thoughts in “Where You Are Planted.”

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    John N

    Appreciate Life
    You can’t take for granted what you don’t earn in life. In the poem “Charleston” Henry Timrod uses many engaging poetic devices to portray the deep meaning of the poem. He portrays his feelings in the background of the poem. “Charleston” has an engaging theme that keeps the reader hooked.
    Timrod states “But Moultrie holds in leash her dogs of war. “Which states a powerful message to the reader. Timrod uses many powerful poetic devices that grasps the reader’s attention by letting the sentences flow.
    “The triumph or the tomb.” Let’s us decide our fate. “Whose hand may wield the patriot’s blade as lightly as the pen” tells us that we decide our path in life. The theme of “Charleston” is war because of the line “The triumph or the Tomb” because it says that we will walk away triumphant or die trying.
    “Charleston” bides its foe by telling the reader that “Who’s hand my one day wield the patriot’s blade as lightly as a pen.” Timrod explains that life is precious and we should not waste it. He says this in these few lines “Who’s sword she sadly bound” which tells us that we should not take life for granted, and “Wait and watch for blood.” Which means life is too short to waste.
    To appreciate life and live at fullest and to not give up. Many poetic devices tell the story of “Charleston” in a way like no other author could tell it, it pot rays the authors true colors that really express the poems real meaning it uses a lot of poetic techniques,it shows the true meaning,

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    Ben H

    Thus to my journeys end…
    “Push along, push along”
    “Death of an Old Carriage Horse” by George Moses Horton is a puzzling poem but quite deep with the included symbolism, feelings, and it changes your point of view. With construction of this poem George Moses Horton was able to establish meanings of symbolism.
    Since this poem was written in the Reconstruction Era after the Civil War, the symbolism as we can see, the horse in the poem might’ve been the colored since the horse is being told what to do in a slave aspect. To backup this theory the last line “Bade me from life to push along” could’ve shaped how the horse would be looked at as a slave. The symbolism we know now could capture a different picture to look at when reading.
    George subtly, picked at the lock to your feelings too, and he successfully managed to do that. He made you kind of have a bond with the horse and George mad you feel bad how it was being treated like it was some robot that could go forever but it really can’t. Once you figure out what the poem is trying to say it constructs a picture that it’s trying to say that this is how it was back then and you just had to deal with people telling other people what to do.
    On the last detail, George changes your perspectives on particular topics relating to the poem. If you read the poem a couple times it makes you feel lucky that you aren’t the horse and that you aren’t treated that way. While making you feel about the horse the symbolism comes into play and you also feel bad for the slaves that were treated so horribly. With all of this feelings and symbolism we can build up what the poem actually means and how it is related to the antebellum period.
    If you actually get what this poem is trying to say it teaches you that if you think all is fair, it really isn’t because take the horse for example because it is being treated poorly. From this poem, George Moses Horton has taught us so much, even how to include symbolism, feelings, and changing the way how you feel about certain things.

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    Bruce

    The Eagle of Freedom
    The poem “The Sun-Struck Eagle” by Eleanor Percy Lee had vast symbolism and repetition to make the theme of life and freedom. The writer of this poem puts heart and emotion into the eagle’s goal. The first supporting evidence of this theme is in how it explains how the eagle is free to fly with the lines “I saw an eagle sweep to the sky”, and, “I saw him rise o’er the trees” This means that the eagle has wants freedom, and is trying to achieve his goal to fly higher. The eagle symbolizes a human casing his goal of freedom by flying higher.
    While on his path to his freedom he had pride in what he is capable of doing. “On his path to pride” “I watched him wheeling stern and lone”, this means his passion and pride flying his destiny and is almost there to his own freedom. When he wheels he is pride of the progress he has made and feels accomplished.
    Then he halts and has sudden drop. “Sick to death with a sun-struck brain.” “Eagle of heaven! Such fall twine!” These line show the long hard fight for freedom but the sudden fall of his progress to have his freedom is shot down. His freedom path is over and so is the Eagle’s life. This poem shows the importance of equal rights, and how hard it was to actually getting that freedom. In conclusion this shows how all men should be free and how life is portrayed in this symbolic poem by Eleanor Percy Lee.

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