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Thread: Astronomy

  1. #1831
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    "You can always find something better than death."
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  2. #1832
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dreamwoven View Post
    I think the search for Planet 9 illustrates how little we know about our own solar system, quite laughably little...
    So if I understand you correctly, Planet 9 has been sort of detected but not really discovered. That's problematic since those who discover a planet are the ones (in theory) who get to name it. My research indicates that the sort of detectors of Planet Nine would like to name their alleged Heavenly body George, after the insane British tyrant, George III. That is a bad idea and a slippery slope that will lead eventually (trust me) to a Planet Trump. So I'm hoping the discoverers and the sort of detectors don't end up being the same people.

    I generally support sticking with the time-tested Roman deity nomenclature, but perhaps some compromise is possible. Diana was the Roman goddess of the hunt and also a screwy (if not actually insane) British royal. But Diana was also the goddess of virgins, so forget it. If we must do crazy Brits, I would prefer a Planet Python (we could pretend it was named after the Python slain by Apollo at Delphi). Unfortunately that suggestion is not on the table at the moment, but the following are:

    Terminus: the Roman god of boundaries. I like it in principle, but it will make us the laughing stock of the galaxy when Planet Ten is found just beyond. And sexual reproduction will already be getting us enough hoots and haws out on Alpha C.

    Tartarus: another name for hell. Again, not bad in principle, but wouldn't it hurt the feelings of future astronauts who received orders to go there?

    Fortuna: The Roman goddess of fortune (alleged by Moll Flanders to be the real God of this earth, and still invoked by Vegas punters under the name Lady Luck). I vote no. It sets the planet up to become a kind of interstellar brothel. What happens on Fortuna stays on Fortuna--that sort of thing. I'd prefer Christa, a combination of another God worshipped in Rome and Christa Mcauliffe, the civilian martyr of space exploration. If anyone deserves a planet she does. But mentioning her name would remind everyone how badly NASA screwed up, so don't hold your breath.

    Shango: an African thunder god. This suggestion has a whiff of PC about it, but I do not actually oppose the idea. In fact, I would like to see the categories expand further to include all myths. There needs to be a Sun Wukong planet (named Wukong, of course--calling it Sun would only confuse people). But starting with Shango would be fine, too.

    Nimoy/Spock: Forget it. The slippery slope would be even worse with 1960s television show characters. Do you really want a planet Agarn? Or Gidget? The same principle applies to the proposed planets [David] Bowie, [Han] Solo, and Olaf (apparently a snowman from the Disney movie "Frozen").

    So for me the finalists are Python, Christa, Wukong, and Shango. Any further nominees?
    Last edited by Pompey Bum; 06-11-2018 at 05:06 PM.

  3. #1833
    Registered User tailor STATELY's Avatar
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    I like the idea of using Sun Wukong's name (a favorite of mine) for a new celestial body. I'll try to think up some more. We'll need two for the next 2-planets discovered:

    All Your Base...


    The Oort Cloud men
    Teach of the
    Planets of the sun
    As ten

    10/11/2006


    Ta ! (short for tarradiddle),
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    Last edited by tailor STATELY; 06-11-2018 at 02:28 PM. Reason: verb
    tailor

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  4. #1834
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    For me the ninth planet is still powerful Pluto. "The strongest perfume is contained in the smallest vessels".

    But keep on with your imaginative name choices. I hope some one from the NASA visits this page. No planet deserves to be called ABC-123 or anything similar.
    Last edited by Danik 2016; 06-11-2018 at 04:08 PM.
    "You can always find something better than death."
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  5. #1835
    Registered User tailor STATELY's Avatar
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    I found a list of Minor Planets on Wikipedia which already exist: 1-1000 - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meanin...:_1–1000

    There are subsequent pages that list over 100,000 names... so I'm thinking we need to become even more creative still.

    Ta ! (short for tarradiddle),
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    tailor

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  6. #1836
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    Some o them are quite funny. There is one called Papagena. Yea, I suspect they are running out o names, that´s why they are using numbers and letters.
    "You can always find something better than death."
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  7. #1837
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    There's a Planet Ohio? NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

    I notice, though, that Fortuna has already been taken. And there's a Georgia named after George II. So maybe we'll end up with a Planet Gidget after all.

    P.S. Nice that Beatrix Potter got something.

  8. #1838
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    Puzzling Cosmic Glow Is Caused by Diamond Dust Glamming Up Stars

    Diamond dust is responsible for a mysterious glow emanating from certain regions of the Milky Way galaxy, a new study reports.
    https://www.space.com/40840-nanodiam...ave-light.html
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  9. #1839
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    https://www.universetoday.com/139455...-clarke-belts/

    This article was interesting. Also about future financial limits on space telescopes.

  10. #1840
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    Interesting article, DW!

    Given the practicality of satellites and the fact that humanity has come to rely on them so much, Socas-Navarro considers that a belt of artificial satellites could naturally be considered “technomarkers” (the analogues of “biomarkers”, which indicate the presence of life).
    I guess that is the point.

    But I think there might be markers of other civilizations which we wouldn´t recognize, because it is not similar to ours.
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  11. #1841
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    http://earthsky.org/space/could-life...lpha-centauri?

    "While the other two stars, Alpha Centauri A and B, are both similar to our sun, Proxima Centauri is a red dwarf, which emits much more deadly X-ray radiation. That is bad news for its one known Earth-sized planet, Proxima b. However, observations from Chandra since 2005 show that conditions around the other two stars are about the same or even better than around our own sun. In terms of the radiation, the prospects for life are actually better for habitable zone planets around Alpha Centauri A than our own sun, with lower doses of X-rays than similar planets in our solar system, and only slightly worse around Alpha Centauri B, by a factor of five."

  12. #1842
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    http://earthsky.org/space/could-life...lpha-centauri?

    "While the other two stars, Alpha Centauri A and B, are both similar to our sun, Proxima Centauri is a red dwarf, which emits much more deadly X-ray radiation. That is bad news for its one known Earth-sized planet, Proxima b. However, observations from Chandra since 2005 show that conditions around the other two stars are about the same or even better than around our own sun. In terms of the radiation, the prospects for life are actually better for habitable zone planets around Alpha Centauri A than our own sun, with lower doses of X-rays than similar planets in our solar system, and only slightly worse around Alpha Centauri B, by a factor of five."

  13. #1843
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dreamwoven View Post
    http://earthsky.org/space/could-life...lpha-centauri?

    "While the other two stars, Alpha Centauri A and B, are both similar to our sun, Proxima Centauri is a red dwarf, which emits much more deadly X-ray radiation. That is bad news for its one known Earth-sized planet, Proxima b. However, observations from Chandra since 2005 show that conditions around the other two stars are about the same or even better than around our own sun. In terms of the radiation, the prospects for life are actually better for habitable zone planets around Alpha Centauri A than our own sun, with lower doses of X-rays than similar planets in our solar system, and only slightly worse around Alpha Centauri B, by a factor of five."
    I wonder if life would be really better there. A future holiday resort?
    "You can always find something better than death."
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  14. #1844
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    https://www.universetoday.com/139478...ously-thought/

    This was an interesting observation!

    "In March of 2015, NASA’s Dawn mission became the first spacecraft to visit the protoplanet Ceres, the largest body in the Main Asteroid Belt. It was also the first spacecraft to visit a dwarf planet, having arrived a few months before the New Horizons mission made its historic flyby of Pluto. Since that time, Dawn has revealed much about Ceres, which in turn is helping scientists to understand the early history of the Solar System.

    Last year, scientists with NASA’s Dawn mission made a startling discovery when they detected complex chains of carbon molecules – organic material essential for life – in patches on the surface of Ceres. And now, thanks to a new study conducted by a team of researchers from Brown University (with the support of NASA), it appears that these patches contain more organic material than previously thought."

  15. #1845
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    https://www.universetoday.com/139478...ously-thought/

    "In March of 2015, NASA’s Dawn mission became the first spacecraft to visit the protoplanet Ceres, the largest body in the Main Asteroid Belt. It was also the first spacecraft to visit a dwarf planet, having arrived a few months before the New Horizons mission made its historic flyby of Pluto. Since that time, Dawn has revealed much about Ceres, which in turn is helping scientists to understand the early history of the Solar System.

    Last year, scientists with NASA’s Dawn mission made a startling discovery when they detected complex chains of carbon molecules – organic material essential for life – in patches on the surface of Ceres. And now, thanks to a new study conducted by a team of researchers from Brown University (with the support of NASA), it appears that these patches contain more organic material than previously thought."

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