Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 49

Thread: An Accomplished writer

  1. #31
    Closed
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    6,375
    Perhaps, but they didn't live in a shabby cottage with a dead garden featuring a pedestal without a statue. The message seems clear enough: Oppressed women! Your would-be liberators will only lead you to deeper misery. Return to security. Return to love.

    I'm not defending Miss Wade, by the way, or putting down Amy Dorrit (or Dickens, who obviously knew nothing of the sensitivities of our times). My question is genuine. It comes from my curiosity about what will follow post-modernism. In Dickens' time, women like Miss Wade were usually seen the way Dickens presents the character: as dangerous firebrands with an air of perversion about them. But women like Amy Dorrit, if any even existed, were the ideal. Today most women are encouraged from girlhood to show the ironical/cynical skepticism of a Miss Wade and to eschew the earnestness of an Amy Dorrit as a kind of folly.

    I genuinely wonder what comes next, that's all. I suspect, as I wrote on another thread, that today's second graders are going to insist on dramatic moral changes (as Dickens & Co brought moral changes to the world they had inherited from Henry Fielding and Laurence Sterne). My question is what comes next? I suspect that irony is about to be largely replaced by earnestness. So will characters like Amy Dorrit become the new role models--even for feminists? Or will writers find other models?

    As far as Christians using "graphic language" goes, it's "Let your aye be aye and your nay be nay," isn't it? And that was probably so that first century Jews didn't swear by the gods of their occupiers ("Yes, by Jupiter!"--that sort of thing). That doesn't mean the Philistines weren't a bunch of f---ing sh--s at times.
    Last edited by Pompey Bum; 11-30-2014 at 10:23 AM.

  2. #32
    Registered User Jackson Richardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Somewhere in the South East of England
    Posts
    1,239
    Gosh that raises so much.

    Carmilla, I'm so glad you finished and enjoyed Little Dorrit. And I'm glad you've given me and Pompey a chance to talk and think about it.

    I do recommend A Christmas Carol at this season.

    I'll come back about Pet Meagles and irony later.
    Previously JonathanB

    The more I read, the more I shall covet to read. Robert Burton The Anatomy of Melancholy Partion3, Section 1, Member 1, Subsection 1

  3. #33
    Closed
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    6,375
    I second that recommendation.

    I look forward to talking with you about this later, Jonathan.

  4. #34
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Argentina
    Posts
    126
    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanB View Post
    Congratulations!^
    Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanB View Post
    (Feminists don't like to admit it, but lots of woman find arrogant men, like Henry Gowan, sexy.
    I agree!

  5. #35
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Argentina
    Posts
    126
    Jonathan:

    Thank you for your kind words. I'll see if I can read 'A Christmas Carol.'

    Pompey and Jonathan:

    I find all your posts extremely interesting. So, I'm looking forward to new ones.

  6. #36
    Closed
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    6,375
    I love Jonathan's comments, too, but where mine are concerned, you are too kind. Enjoy A Christmas Carol, and let us know more of your own opinions.

  7. #37
    Registered User Jackson Richardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Somewhere in the South East of England
    Posts
    1,239
    Gosh, I keep putting off posting here. I'll try to be back in a few days. (I noticed a contrast between Amy - whose father takes her for granted - and Pet - whose father idolises her to the point of not allowing her to be person in her own right. Tattycoram senses this, and only returns to the Meagles when Pet is gone, so she can now be the favoured daughter of the house, and not a kept sidekick to Pet.)
    Previously JonathanB

    The more I read, the more I shall covet to read. Robert Burton The Anatomy of Melancholy Partion3, Section 1, Member 1, Subsection 1

  8. #38
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    13
    Oh, Miss Wade. She's one of the most vile Dickens character in my opinion. Unlike Quilp whose evilness is deliciously over the top, Miss Wade is relatively normal if not for the fact that she spits on the face on kindness while playing the poor oppressed victim. She's someone who will dismiss even the angelic kindness of Esther, Amy, and Nell as "condescension", and that is something I cannot stomach. The worst thing about it is that she isn't really satirized much like other Dickens villain. She even gets her own biased narrative chapter (which, hilariously, some folks actually buy)

    I think she's a good character to have since it shows that Dickens may love to take potshots on condescending rich people, but perhaps sometimes it's the poor orphan who's at fault for being such an "unhappy temper", imagining snobbery and oppression where there is none.

    If she were a feminist, she would be the perfect example of the negative view of feminists; a bunch of whiny self-righteous folks who love to play the victim.

  9. #39
    Registered User Jackson Richardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Somewhere in the South East of England
    Posts
    1,239
    Welcome and thanks for responding to a thread I was on a year ago.

    There's something a bit pathetic about Miss Wade. Like Mrs Clenam and Miss Havisham she tries to gain power over others by making herself miserable. But she doesn't have their money, so there's a limit to what she can do. All she does is seduce Tattycoram, who does have some good reason to feel patronized by the Meagles, whoever kindly intentioned.

    I have some sympathy with Miss Wade as she is the nearest to a lesbian I know in Victorian literature and unfortunately embodies the negative stereotypes.
    Previously JonathanB

    The more I read, the more I shall covet to read. Robert Burton The Anatomy of Melancholy Partion3, Section 1, Member 1, Subsection 1

  10. #40
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    13
    Okay, where did this lesbian thing come from? I certainly didn't see anything on the text that went to that direction.

  11. #41
    Registered User Jackson Richardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Somewhere in the South East of England
    Posts
    1,239
    There wouldn't be anything unambiguous in the text in the C19. She's single, has no interest in men and a a big interest in Tattycoram.
    Previously JonathanB

    The more I read, the more I shall covet to read. Robert Burton The Anatomy of Melancholy Partion3, Section 1, Member 1, Subsection 1

  12. #42
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    13
    Oh come on, that sounds like you just have your shipping goggles on.

  13. #43
    Registered User Jackson Richardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Somewhere in the South East of England
    Posts
    1,239
    We can agree she’s a nasty bit of work. You made me wonder what she’s doing in the book, because as far as I remember she is tangential to the main plot.

    Then I thought she’s another example of the prison taint, in her case the self-imposed prison of her suspicion.
    Previously JonathanB

    The more I read, the more I shall covet to read. Robert Burton The Anatomy of Melancholy Partion3, Section 1, Member 1, Subsection 1

  14. #44
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    India
    Posts
    5
    Hey, it seems like you have read Great Expectations. Have u read Tom Jones?

  15. #45
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Argentina
    Posts
    126
    Quote Originally Posted by Jackson Richardson View Post
    Gosh that raises so much.

    Carmilla, I'm so glad you finished and enjoyed Little Dorrit. And I'm glad you've given me and Pompey a chance to talk and think about it.

    I do recommend A Christmas Carol at this season.

    I'll come back about Pet Meagles and irony later.
    Jackson Richardson:
    I have finally bought a copy of A Christmas Carol, and I intend to read it next festive season as you recommended.
    Last edited by Carmilla; 06-29-2016 at 09:09 PM.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. How many accomplished writers in the last 10 years...
    By yudencow in forum General Literature
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-24-2013, 07:32 AM
  2. Attn: Accomplished Writers
    By ThousandthIsle in forum General Writing
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 11-26-2012, 10:17 PM
  3. mission accomplished
    By cacian in forum Personal Poetry
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-19-2012, 04:47 PM
  4. Replies: 18
    Last Post: 05-27-2011, 04:10 PM
  5. Did LitNet accomplished your expectations?
    By bazarov in forum General Chat
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-17-2007, 05:54 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •