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Thread: Furthermore, hence, on the other hand

  1. #1
    Registered User kev67's Avatar
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    Furthermore, hence, on the other hand

    What do you think of words like 'furthermore', 'nevertheless', 'moreover', 'notwithstanding' and the like? They seem a little archaic and legalese to me. On the other hand, they make a change from 'therefore' and 'however', particularly at the start of sentences. I often want to use a word like this if I am writing a dense paragraph of related ideas. What do you think of the phrase 'on the other hand'? It is almost like a word itself. Perhaps if the phrase had been around for longer it would now be spelt 'ontheotherhand'. I notice it is commonly abbreviated to 'OTOH' on internet forums. I often want to use 'on the other hand', but I suspect it is bad style. What about words like 'hence' and 'thus'? These words seem even more archaic than 'moreover' and 'notwithstanding'. They are sometimes used as filler words in sentences. I am not actually sure what the difference between 'hence' and 'thus' is.
    According to Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence once said that Balzac was 'a gigantic dwarf', and in a sense the same is true of Dickens.
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    Card-carrying Medievalist Lokasenna's Avatar
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    I don't think 'on the other hand' is in bad style, and I have seen it used plenty of times in formal academic writing. I tend to use most of the terms use list pretty frequently - they allow for great precision in writing.
    "I should only believe in a God that would know how to dance. And when I saw my devil, I found him serious, thorough, profound, solemn: he was the spirit of gravity- through him all things fall. Not by wrath, but by laughter, do we slay. Come, let us slay the spirit of gravity!" - Nietzsche

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    Registered User Emil Miller's Avatar
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    I don't think any of the words you have mentioned are archaic ; I use them regularly. If you don't want to use them, why not use 'conversely'?
    "L'art de la statistique est de tirer des conclusions erronèes a partir de chiffres exacts." Napoléon Bonaparte.

    "Je crois que beaucoup de gens sont dans cet état d’esprit: au fond, ils ne sentent pas concernés par l’Histoire. Mais pourtant, de temps à autre, l’Histoire pose sa main sur eux." Michel Houellebecq.

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    Registered User kev67's Avatar
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    'Conversely' is a good one.

    I just looked up 'furthermore' on Word's thesaurus. It suggested 'also' and 'in addition'. I am aware of overusing 'also' and 'in addition' in my writing. I have started checking my work to delete irritating also's where I can. Maybe I could throw in the occasional 'furthermore' and 'moreover', provided I don't overdo it.
    According to Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence once said that Balzac was 'a gigantic dwarf', and in a sense the same is true of Dickens.
    Charles Dickens, by George Orwell

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    Tidings of Literature Whosis's Avatar
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    Nevertheless is a useful one for me.

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    I don't like "Having said that," because very often this participle "dangles:" that is, when it is (incorrectly) followed by anything other than "I. . ." The cop-out phrase, "That said" or "that being said" isn't much better as it sounds stilted, passive, and awkward.

    When you want to add the contrary notion, you could say "Even so," or "however," or "nevertheless." You could make a complex sentence by including a clause beginning with "although," or a compound sentence using the plain old, ordinary conjunction "but" .

    "On the other hand" is okay, but it should be used only for two contradictory ideas. It's no good for more than two, since nobody has three hands (on this biosphere anyway!)

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    Justifiably inexcusable DocHeart's Avatar
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    They're just words we say, tools we use. They'll sound good in some contexts and bloody awful in others. Like my jokes.
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