Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 39 of 39

Thread: Profanity in Literature

  1. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    95
    Quote Originally Posted by Lykren View Post
    Low lives? Really? I deem such classist terminology to be far more offensive than any f***ing or s***ting going on.
    For sure. Again, as I said in my previous post, anyone who is that intimidated by four-letter words or their equivalents comes across as very judgmental and close-minded, which to me is the complete opposite of great literature/art

  2. #32
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    95
    Quote Originally Posted by MANICHAEAN View Post
    Even if "low lives" had the inclination to use on Lit Net Forums, "Anglo Saxon" four letter words that invariably began with the earlier letters of the English language, the computer would arrest their inclusion.

    Try writing, "Being a nice day he decided to take his black ***** for a walk," or " He rode into Jeresulem on his ***."
    Yeah, what a pain in the ***. I hate message boards that censor words. Rotten Tomatoes is the same way for me, and I frequently visit there. Some people go through the extra pain of slightly mistyping or formatting the swear words so that they do show up, but that seems like a lot of effort just to make a word show up.

    I still can't get over those who say that people are "lowlifes" if they say certain words. What ****ing century do we live in?! I really can't believe some of the stuff that bothers LitNetters. Would Shakespeare or Dante not be great authors if they were throwing F-bombs around in their works? Of course they would be! People from less money as ourselves or *GASP!* drug addicts aren't inferior to others...shocking, I know.

  3. #33
    Registered User Iain Sparrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    xxxxx
    Posts
    548
    Quote Originally Posted by Vladimir777 View Post
    It amazes me that so many people on this board have a problem with swearing. Does nobody else swear constantly, or at least hear it constantly, in their everyday life? Who cares?! This seems like a very uptight group on here.

    I can't imagine even thinking about reading "****" or "****" or whatever else when reading a book. That's just how people talk. Not using those words does NOT make you a superior person to those who do, no matter how much you'd like to think so. In fact, I tend not to trust people who don't swear. I know lots of other people like me. There's something...weird about a young person who doesn't even cuss.

    I agree completely... or I ****ing completely agree with you.

    It certainly doesn't bother me in literature, nor in real life.
    Sure, there's more appropriate times and less appropriate times for it, but either way I don't make too many character assessments based on someone cursing.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by noseyparkerunit View Post
    And WHO is to judge when it is unnecessary? Who is to be the ultimate arbiter?
    Who needs an ultimate arbiter? We can all make our own judgements. I swear a lot in my life, but I agree with who you were replying to that in literature a lot of the time it seems unnecessary, though I might rather say that it seems forced. Sure, people can swear a lot and not give it a second thought, but we're talking about literature here, where writers tend to give their work a lot more than a second thought as they write it, and so when I'm reading a piece of considered prose it becomes a lot easier to see the odd bit of profanity as just being there for effect.

  5. #35
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    95
    Quote Originally Posted by Iain Sparrow View Post
    I agree completely... or I ****ing completely agree with you.

    It certainly doesn't bother me in literature, nor in real life.
    Sure, there's more appropriate times and less appropriate times for it, but either way I don't make too many character assessments based on someone cursing.


    Glad to hear that someone else agrees. I think cursing may be more of a...faux pas for older people? I'm not sure. As someone on the first page (the OP?) mentioned, they remember when "Working-Class Hero" by John Lennon came out, implying they are at least in their 40s. Great song by the way (great album, in fact). So perhaps the younger you are, the less you mind it? Certainly, we are more and more surrounded by obscenity when it comes to mainstream media than ever before.

    In my opinion, within a generation or two, censorship over language will be completely eliminated from things like TV or the radio. It's getting close to it right now. I always felt like the US was behind other countries in terms of its fear of bad language and sex (oooooo, such bad things!!!), perhaps because of our Puritan roots, but I'm not actually sure if this is the case with bad language the same way it is with sex portrayals (in which we are notably very prude).

  6. #36
    Grumpy Book Critic
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    110
    It's kind of odd how Vlad seems genuinely upset at the idea of someone being annoyed by excessive swearing. Close minded and judgmental? Is it a problem that I feel uncomfortable about saying "****?" The way I see it, swears are in literature for a reason; Expression. If you overuse them, then they lose their power, and then they just fall flat. I'm okay with tossing in profanity when the situation desires, but why should it come up in casual conversation? Like JanVanHogspeuw said, writing is considered, pre-planned. Swearing is not spontaneous in literature, so if it isn't serving a purpose, it shouldn't be there.

    Someone posed the argument that "real people swear," but that just depends on the people you surround yourself with.
    a dead account

  7. #37
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    95
    Quote Originally Posted by Hwo Thumb View Post
    It's kind of odd how Vlad seems genuinely upset at the idea of someone being annoyed by excessive swearing. Close minded and judgmental? Is it a problem that I feel uncomfortable about saying "****?" The way I see it, swears are in literature for a reason; Expression. If you overuse them, then they lose their power, and then they just fall flat. I'm okay with tossing in profanity when the situation desires, but why should it come up in casual conversation? Like JanVanHogspeuw said, writing is considered, pre-planned. Swearing is not spontaneous in literature, so if it isn't serving a purpose, it shouldn't be there.

    Someone posed the argument that "real people swear," but that just depends on the people you surround yourself with.
    You're probably right that I was being a big judgmental and close-minded with my initial flurry of posts.

    I do agree that swearing in novels that are in the actual descriptions, as opposed to just coming from, say, a character's speech or the narrator's "voice," seems weird, since you're right that swearing is usually an off-the-cuff, emotionally-invested expression of some sort, whereas writing is "considered, pre-planned," as you put it.

  8. #38
    Grumpy Book Critic
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    110
    Quote Originally Posted by Vladimir777 View Post
    You're probably right that I was being a big judgmental and close-minded with my initial flurry of posts.

    I do agree that swearing in novels that are in the actual descriptions, as opposed to just coming from, say, a character's speech or the narrator's "voice," seems weird, since you're right that swearing is usually an off-the-cuff, emotionally-invested expression of some sort, whereas writing is "considered, pre-planned," as you put it.
    See, I don't think it's just about descriptions, though. Like I said, it kind of bugs me when characters will be talking casually and just randomly swear. I mean, maybe an author is just trying to create a more "real" character, but in my experience, the people who will use "****" as a flavor word to toss in for lack of a better way to describe their feelings also tend to be the type of people I don't like to be around.
    a dead account

  9. #39
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    95
    Quote Originally Posted by Hwo Thumb View Post
    See, I don't think it's just about descriptions, though. Like I said, it kind of bugs me when characters will be talking casually and just randomly swear. I mean, maybe an author is just trying to create a more "real" character, but in my experience, the people who will use "****" as a flavor word to toss in for lack of a better way to describe their feelings also tend to be the type of people I don't like to be around.
    To be fair, I bet you read a lot of books that involve people you wouldn't like to be around.

    To each his own, though.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Similar Threads

  1. British Literature vs. American Literature
    By Brendan Madley in forum General Literature
    Replies: 266
    Last Post: 09-02-2011, 09:36 PM
  2. Profanity in Novels
    By keilj in forum General Literature
    Replies: 155
    Last Post: 04-03-2010, 11:17 AM
  3. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-11-2007, 04:02 AM
  4. Need book with list of literature-all literature-please help
    By steve_y in forum General Literature
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-10-2006, 11:35 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •