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Thread: listing all Pub Names you have ever come across

  1. #61
    Registered User kev67's Avatar
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    I recently went to a pub near Euston Station (in London) called The Doric Arch. I thought that was an odd name for a pub. Recently I heard a radio programme about 18th century smugglers in Rye. The smugglers used to meet in a pub called The Mermaid. What a great name for a smugglers' pub!

    At present I am keeping an eye out for local pubs with foreign language mottoes. There were several within half a mile of each other with Latin mottoes:

    The Wynford Arms (a gay pub): vedere non est credere
    The Lyndhurst: ultra pergere
    The Eldon Arms (recently closed): sit sine labe decus

    I am told there is a pub in another part of town called The Prince of Wales, which has his motto on the sign: ich dien. There do not seem to be many others.
    According to Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence once said that Balzac was 'a gigantic dwarf', and in a sense the same is true of Dickens.
    Charles Dickens, by George Orwell

  2. #62
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    The Pickwick Papers is full of wonderful pubs with wonderful names. I''m just about to enter the Magpie and Stump.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by YesNo View Post
    I rarely go to pubs (or bars) unless I'm with coworkers and we need to do this for some reason. However, I did see the movie, "The World's End", which was about a pub called The World's End. I don't know if it actually exists, but it did make me want to visit some if I ever made it to England.
    There's one called The Pillars of Hercules, on the border of Soho in London, so it may be a little bit along from there... It's just round the corner from Foyles wonderful new bookshop, so you have an excuse...

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by cacian View Post
    I recall Ye Olde Trip To Jerusalem England's oldest pub dating 1189AD in Nottingham. and what a pub a great piece of history
    The guy opened The Saracen's Head in Glasgow, on his return

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Kid View Post
    Friend, it was a joke. I know it wasn't that funny, but why the hostility?
    I wasn't bothered by your bending of the vernacular, but I did wonder if your use of the term "across the pond" for the UK was acceptable in San Francisco. Wouldn't you end up in Japan?

    Any good Japanese pub names?

  6. #66
    Registered User Jackson Richardson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kev67 View Post
    I recently went to a pub near Euston Station (in London) called The Doric Arch. I thought that was an odd name for a pub..
    Until the 1960s, the entrance to Euston Station was a giant arch of the Doric order.

    http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/...London-001.jpg

    It was demolished in 1961, to considerable disapproval. The pub is mentioned on the Wikipedia site

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euston_Arch
    Previously JonathanB

    The more I read, the more I shall covet to read. Robert Burton The Anatomy of Melancholy Partion3, Section 1, Member 1, Subsection 1

  7. #67
    Registered User Emil Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kev67 View Post
    Recently I heard a radio programme about 18th century smugglers in Rye. The smugglers used to meet in a pub called The Mermaid. What a great name for a smugglers' pub!

    Rye is a very pretty little town in Sussex and something of a tourist attraction. The writer Henry James lived there for almost 20 years and the filmed version of H.G. Wells's novel The History of Mr Polly starring John Mills was filmed there on account of the high street being practically unchanged since Edwardian times. I have visited The Mermaid pub and it really is worth the trip as I discovered when I was photographed there some years ago.



    "L'art de la statistique est de tirer des conclusions erronèes a partir de chiffres exacts." Napoléon Bonaparte.

    "Je crois que beaucoup de gens sont dans cet état d’esprit: au fond, ils ne sentent pas concernés par l’Histoire. Mais pourtant, de temps à autre, l’Histoire pose sa main sur eux." Michel Houellebecq.

  8. #68
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    Beautiful photo!

  9. #69
    Card-carrying Medievalist Lokasenna's Avatar
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    That does indeed look lovely.
    "I should only believe in a God that would know how to dance. And when I saw my devil, I found him serious, thorough, profound, solemn: he was the spirit of gravity- through him all things fall. Not by wrath, but by laughter, do we slay. Come, let us slay the spirit of gravity!" - Nietzsche

  10. #70
    Registered User readspider's Avatar
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    One of my favourites is a long closed down pub in Rockhampton, Central Queensland called 'The Square and the Compass'.

  11. #71
    MANICHAEAN MANICHAEAN's Avatar
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    Some of the bars I have come across since coming to Yokohama have included:
    1. Laser Rush: Japanese owner with Scottish wife. Best range of single malts in town.
    2. The Full Monty. Not a male stripper in sight.
    3. The Tavern: English grub, London Pride beer & compulsory karioke. If you are English expect to give a rendition of the Beatles numbers. Being half Irish, I limit myself to "Danny Boy"
    4. The X Bar: Like something out of "Kill Bill."

  12. #72
    Registered User 108 fountains's Avatar
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    There was a fascination of sorts in Thailand with the Bill Clinton/Monica Lewinski scandal. The fascination apparently stemmed from the incredulous response by the Thais that Americans actually considered the whole affair to be a “scandal.” Anyway, in 1998-1999, a couple of expats who had opened several bars not far from Nana Plaza on Sukhumvit Road decided to call the area where their bars were located “Clinton Plaza” and renamed a couple of the bars “Monica’s Bar” and “Bill’s Coffee House.” A dispute about ownership among developers led to the bars being closed after a couple of years, but another bar with a name borne of the same fascination, “Hillary Bar,” located just a block from nana Plaza, became so popular that there are now four Hillary Bars (Hillary 1, Hillary 2, Hillary 3, and Hillary 4) in Bangkok and at least one Hillary Bar in Pattaya. There is also a very popular Lewinski’s International Sports Bar and Grill in Pattaya that actually has pretty good Western food and a decent (no bar girl) atmosphere.

    I bet the owners of the Hillary Bar chain will be jubilant if Hillary Clinton should be elected U.S. President. In fact, I bet spending election night at one of the Hillary Bars would be a lot of fun.
    A just conception of life is too large a thing to grasp during the short interval of passing through it.
    Thomas Hardy

  13. #73
    Registered User Emil Miller's Avatar
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    There is a pub in Kingston on Thames called The Druid's Head; here's a review I did of it for a pub guide:

    I travel some way to get to this pub simply because there is a dearth of civilised watering holes in London. By civilised I mean no pop music and, even though there is the usual caterwauling female coming from loudspeakers in the main bar, there is a small bar without speakers in which the main bar's noise is insufficient to be an insult to the intelligence. Avoid at all costs on a Friday night when, presumably to attract the teenage element, the speakers are going full blast with the kind of noise that one might encounter in darkest Africa.
    Wetherspoons have a speakerless pub in Kingston but as with all their establishments, it's full of old plonkers loudly rhubarbing away as the Fosters takes hold.
    "L'art de la statistique est de tirer des conclusions erronèes a partir de chiffres exacts." Napoléon Bonaparte.

    "Je crois que beaucoup de gens sont dans cet état d’esprit: au fond, ils ne sentent pas concernés par l’Histoire. Mais pourtant, de temps à autre, l’Histoire pose sa main sur eux." Michel Houellebecq.

  14. #74
    Registered User Emil Miller's Avatar
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    Somebody mentioned to me a pub with an unusual name: It's called The Gazebo and is situated in a charming location right on the riverside at Kingston so I decided to pay a visit and later that day I did a write up for the pub guide:

    'The Gazebo was recommended to me by a Kingston resident as being a quiet place where it's possible to have a drink without jungle noises from loudspeakers or loud-mouthed yobs. So I went there at 4.00pm two days ago and found it to be exactly what I hoped it would be. I walked up to the bar and saw that every single beer on draught was Samuel Smith's, possibly the most tasteless beer in England. The riverside setting is really charming but the beer kills it stone dead. A couple of passers-by looked in but, noticing the name on the pumps, walked on.
    I loath Wetherspoons pubs on account of the number of old plonkers who spend all their days there cackling and hooting inanely like the inmates of an asylum, but after a pint of Samuel Smith's I had to pop into the KIng's Tun for a pint of Leffe which immediately restored my tastebuds to normal.'

    Interestingly, I discovered this Daily Telegraph article that corroborates what I wrote, but beer at 2.8% ? they must be joking.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/think...mith-pubs.html
    Last edited by Emil Miller; 10-04-2014 at 02:26 PM.
    "L'art de la statistique est de tirer des conclusions erronèes a partir de chiffres exacts." Napoléon Bonaparte.

    "Je crois que beaucoup de gens sont dans cet état d’esprit: au fond, ils ne sentent pas concernés par l’Histoire. Mais pourtant, de temps à autre, l’Histoire pose sa main sur eux." Michel Houellebecq.

  15. #75
    Yes a great photo Emil. I would love to walk up that hill with a thirst and then discover such a pub at the top. What a joy!

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