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Thread: Paradise Lost

  1. #16
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    I haven't read that. I've read The whole Chronicles of Narnia series, but plan to delve into his other writings in the future.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vota View Post
    I can't give you a well reasoned academic answer as far as why reading Shakespeare helped me, but my guess is it's the antiquated style of speech. Same thing for the King James Bible. I had heard people say Milton and Shakespeare were difficult reads, but because I had read The King James Bible quite abit, I found adapting to the older style and spelling of the speech of Shakespeare and Milton to be pretty easy. I actually feel like Milton is easier to read than Shakespeare, but I think it's because Shakespeare has and uses words that have different meanings than we are used to using, probably more so Americans than western europeans, whereas Milton really didn't use any words that I had difficulty grasping. Milton spells common words different than they are spelled now, in places, but it's generally pretty obvious what the word is.

    I would definitely recommend reading it straight through in it's entirety. It is beautiful and really elaborates on the bible in a creative and wonderful way. Even though I said I wasn't sure if I would read it again, that wasn't really a strike against it. I have so many books to read, and not many books get a second read from me. Even then, I enjoyed it enough that I plan to read the majority of his best known works, so that's saying something in itself.
    Thanks for the response, Vota! I am planning to read both the New Testament and the great works of Shakespeare now before PL. Mostly because both the King James Bible and Shakespeare are the center of the English (and Western in general) canon, but also to help familiarize myself with archaic Modern English. I got used to the antiquated language eventually in the Old Testament, but I could see how Shakespeare is the hardest of all, since he is writing in a form of poetry that often deals with multiple meanings, and is incredibly symbolically dense. But I imagine his writing is the most rewarding once you master understanding and reading it.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vladimir777 View Post
    Thanks for the response, Vota! I am planning to read both the New Testament and the great works of Shakespeare now before PL. Mostly because both the King James Bible and Shakespeare are the center of the English (and Western in general) canon, but also to help familiarize myself with archaic Modern English. I got used to the antiquated language eventually in the Old Testament, but I could see how Shakespeare is the hardest of all, since he is writing in a form of poetry that often deals with multiple meanings, and is incredibly symbolically dense. But I imagine his writing is the most rewarding once you master understanding and reading it.
    That is a very good point you bring up about Shakespeare. His work is definitely rich and dense with meaning. I really have to be paying attention while reading him, much like when reading poetry. Good point.

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