Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: Book Promotion: The Descriptive Paragraph at the Back of a Book Cover

  1. #1
    confidentially pleased cacian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    London
    Posts
    13,453

    Lightbulb Book Promotion: The Descriptive Paragraph at the Back of a Book Cover

    How important is the promotive/descriptive paragraph at the back of a book?
    How often do you read it when you want to buy a book to?
    I just wonder whether it would be different or similar if written by the writers themselves.
    Last edited by cacian; 01-17-2013 at 04:44 AM.
    it may never try
    but when it does it sigh
    it is just that
    good
    it fly

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    England
    Posts
    5
    I find that very often the back cover doesn't do the book itself justice. A good example of this would be 'children's' books such as Harry Potter, because on the outside that's what it seems like but it has grown to be known and loved by children and adults alike. I normally read the first couple of pages as well, just to get a feel of the author's writing style.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    309
    Blog Entries
    2
    I always read them and can easily be put off books by them - reading the back of 50 Shades of Grey was the best laugh I have had in ages ( and all I needed to convince me never to read that tripe).

  4. #4
    Registered User Emil Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    6,499
    I always read the blurb on the rear cover if only to get an idea of what the story is about. I'm currently proofreading my last novel which is destined for worldwide on-line distribution in paper and Ebook format. I have paid particular attention to the rear cover as it's important to ensure that the synopsis gives a clear description of the salient features of the story while at the same time encouraging a potential reader to open the book and start reading.
    Obviously, if a book is a piece of nonsense like Fifty Shades of Grey, the blurb is likely to reflect the contents by having a similar tone, but people who take their reading with some seriousness are usually quite well served by the the rear cover summary.
    "L'art de la statistique est de tirer des conclusions erronèes a partir de chiffres exacts." Napoléon Bonaparte.

    "Je crois que beaucoup de gens sont dans cet état d’esprit: au fond, ils ne sentent pas concernés par l’Histoire. Mais pourtant, de temps à autre, l’Histoire pose sa main sur eux." Michel Houellebecq.

  5. #5
    Registered User kelby_lake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    3,620
    I always read blurb and look out for 'buzz' words- things I know I like reading about and will sound like a good read. 'Obsession' for example.

  6. #6
    Voice of Chaos & Anarchy
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    In one of the branches of the multiverse, but I don't know which one.
    Posts
    7,012
    Blog Entries
    439
    I used to read cover blurbs, but then I found out that, like cover art, they may have been created by people who didn't read the book. I like to find out what the book is generally about, and the blurbs seldom help. More recently I have taken to opening the book at random and reading a little bit; that gives more information.

  7. #7
    I read, therefore I am
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    89
    Read them all the time. It helps whet my appetite

  8. #8
    Registered User Emil Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    6,499
    Quote Originally Posted by Bibliophile79 View Post
    Read them all the time. It helps whet my appetite
    That's what they are intended for.
    "L'art de la statistique est de tirer des conclusions erronèes a partir de chiffres exacts." Napoléon Bonaparte.

    "Je crois que beaucoup de gens sont dans cet état d’esprit: au fond, ils ne sentent pas concernés par l’Histoire. Mais pourtant, de temps à autre, l’Histoire pose sa main sur eux." Michel Houellebecq.

  9. #9
    confidentially pleased cacian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    London
    Posts
    13,453
    Quote Originally Posted by Emil Miller View Post
    That's what they are intended for.
    Emil what is your novel/story about? and could you post the synopsis here to show us how you did it?
    it may never try
    but when it does it sigh
    it is just that
    good
    it fly

  10. #10
    confidentially pleased cacian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    London
    Posts
    13,453
    Quote Originally Posted by EstherAlexandra View Post
    I find that very often the back cover doesn't do the book itself justice. A good example of this would be 'children's' books such as Harry Potter, because on the outside that's what it seems like but it has grown to be known and loved by children and adults alike. I normally read the first couple of pages as well, just to get a feel of the author's writing style.
    I am usually tempted to read the last lines first just to get the feel of it haha. I have done that a couple of times.
    it may never try
    but when it does it sigh
    it is just that
    good
    it fly

  11. #11
    confidentially pleased cacian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    London
    Posts
    13,453
    Quote Originally Posted by kelby_lake View Post
    I always read blurb and look out for 'buzz' words- things I know I like reading about and will sound like a good read. 'Obsession' for example.
    What about' Obssession'?
    it may never try
    but when it does it sigh
    it is just that
    good
    it fly

  12. #12
    Registered User Emil Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    6,499
    Quote Originally Posted by cacian View Post
    Emil what is your novel/story about? and could you post the synopsis here to show us how you did it?
    Pleased to oblige but if you decide to read it, when it's available in a few weeks time, please don't read the ending first as you have stated that you normally to do. As with my previous novels, the last sentence is key to all that has gone before.


    The town of Amalfi on Italy’s beautiful Costiera Amalfitana becomes a place of fear and betrayal for Jerome Wakefield who has been living a sybaritic lifestyle as the author of two highly acclaimed but plagiarised novels.
    His attempt to avoid discovery of his imposture by moving to the town is rudely shattered by a chance occurrence that leads to blackmail and murder, but others are also out to expose him and he finds his life in great danger.
    Jake Melrose, who heads the giant American consortium Supascope Entertainments, and Lord Redstone, an English promoter of pop music, mirror Wakefield’s own duplicity, while even his wife proves unfaithful as his life of ease begins to unravel towards its inevitable dénouement.

    Set in the 1970s, this novel may be as much about its readers as the characters in the story, for a large part of humanity was sold mechanically processed sub-musical rubbish both before and after the decade. How it was done is at the heart of this satire on the psychology of deceit and mass manipulation.
    "L'art de la statistique est de tirer des conclusions erronèes a partir de chiffres exacts." Napoléon Bonaparte.

    "Je crois que beaucoup de gens sont dans cet état d’esprit: au fond, ils ne sentent pas concernés par l’Histoire. Mais pourtant, de temps à autre, l’Histoire pose sa main sur eux." Michel Houellebecq.

  13. #13
    confidentially pleased cacian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    London
    Posts
    13,453
    Quote Originally Posted by Emil Miller View Post
    Pleased to oblige but if you decide to read it, when it's available in a few weeks time, please don't read the ending first as you have stated that you normally to do. As with my previous novels, the last sentence is key to all that has gone before.
    lol no I won't this time.
    The town of Amalfi on Italy’s beautiful Costiera Amalfitana becomes a place of fear and betrayal for Jerome Wakefield who has been living a sybaritic lifestyle as the author of two highly acclaimed but plagiarised novels.
    His attempt to avoid discovery of his imposture by moving to the town is rudely shattered by a chance occurrence that leads to blackmail and murder, but others are also out to expose him and he finds his life in great danger.
    Jake Melrose, who heads the giant American consortium Supascope Entertainments, and Lord Redstone, an English promoter of pop music, mirror Wakefield’s own duplicity, while even his wife proves unfaithful as his life of ease begins to unravel towards its inevitable dénouement.
    Interesting read. Amalfi caught my eyes. I use to have an Italian English born who use to go to Amalfi all the time for her holidays. She had family there.
    I remember her talking about it. Is Costiera Amalfitan italian expression?
    Can I ask why chose Amalfi?
    The plot looks very tense indeed.

    Set in the 1970s, this novel may be as much about its readers as the characters in the story, for a large part of humanity was sold mechanically processed sub-musical rubbish both before and after the decade. How it was done is at the heart of this satire on the psychology of deceit and mass manipulation.
    You mention ''mechanically processed sub-musical rubbish''. Do you mean to say the music in the 70s was bad taste or untalented as is mechanised and robotic?
    it may never try
    but when it does it sigh
    it is just that
    good
    it fly

  14. #14
    Registered User Emil Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    6,499
    [QUOTE=cacian;1199600]lol no I won't this time.


    Interesting read. Amalfi caught my eyes. I use to have an Italian English born who use to go to Amalfi all the time for her holidays. She had family there.
    I remember her talking about it. Is Costiera Amalfitan italian expression?
    Can I ask why chose Amalfi?
    The plot looks very tense indeed.
    Amalfi is well known as a tourist location and it's a very select place to live due to its position on the Costiera Amalfitana which translates as 'Amalfi Coast'. I chose it because it's an interesting location and, unlike the French Riviera, relatively discreet and ideal for the story of someone who sought both luxurious surroundings and a certain anonymity. The story definitely has its tense moments but also some comic ones in its send up of the silliness of the pop music scene and those who are a part of it.

    You mention ''mechanically processed sub-musical rubbish''. Do you mean to say the music in the 70s was bad taste or untalented as is mechanised and robotic?
    Yes, but please note the synopsis refers to 'music' produced before and after that particular decade.
    Last edited by Emil Miller; 01-18-2013 at 10:38 AM.
    "L'art de la statistique est de tirer des conclusions erronèes a partir de chiffres exacts." Napoléon Bonaparte.

    "Je crois que beaucoup de gens sont dans cet état d’esprit: au fond, ils ne sentent pas concernés par l’Histoire. Mais pourtant, de temps à autre, l’Histoire pose sa main sur eux." Michel Houellebecq.

  15. #15
    Registered User kelby_lake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    3,620
    To show you my buzz words theory, I've bolded the words that create buzz for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Emil Miller View Post
    The town of Amalfi on Italy’s beautiful Costiera Amalfitana becomes a place of fear and betrayal for Jerome Wakefield who has been living a sybaritic lifestyle as the author of two highly acclaimed but plagiarised novels.
    His attempt to avoid discovery of his imposture by moving to the town is rudely shattered by a chance occurrence that leads to blackmail and murder, but others are also out to expose him and he finds his life in great danger.
    Jake Melrose, who heads the giant American consortium Supascope Entertainments, and Lord Redstone, an English promoter of pop music, mirror Wakefield’s own duplicity, while even his wife proves unfaithful as his life of ease begins to unravel towards its inevitable dénouement.

    Set in the 1970s, this novel may be as much about its readers as the characters in the story, for a large part of humanity was sold mechanically processed sub-musical rubbish both before and after the decade. How it was done is at the heart of this satire on the psychology of deceit and mass manipulation.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Judging a Book by its Cover: Favorite Cover Art
    By MarcoPolo in forum General Literature
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 05-06-2015, 06:50 PM
  2. Best book cover !
    By Nazish in forum General Literature
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-31-2010, 04:46 PM
  3. How important is a Book's Cover?
    By Indian Boy in forum General Literature
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 11-15-2009, 06:22 PM
  4. What is your favourite cover of a book ever?
    By Jtolj in forum General Literature
    Replies: 52
    Last Post: 04-28-2008, 12:15 PM
  5. do not judge the book by its cover
    By kaminari-chan in forum Around the World in Eighty Days
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-24-2005, 06:07 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •