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Thread: The New LitNet Top 100 Books

  1. #151
    Paperback Writer
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    I've read:

    1. The Bible (well, about half of it)
    2. Hamlet by William Shakespeare
    4. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    23. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad (did not enjoy at all)
    26. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    32. Watership Down by Richard Adams (I've exchanged letters with Richard Adams.)
    35. Walden by Henry David Thoreau
    36. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    41. Lord of the Rings by J.R.R Tolkien
    44. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert (Lydia Davis's 2012 translation)
    47. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
    56. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
    57. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
    70. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
    72. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
    74. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
    77. 1984 by George Orwell
    80. Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
    89. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
    100. Julius Caesar by Shakespeare

    20/100. I suppose that's a decent start.
    "Begin at the beginning... and go on till you come to the end; then stop." — Lewis Carroll

  2. #152
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    I've read:

    1. The Bible (not the entire book)
    2. Hamlet by William Shakespeare
    4. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    5. The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
    9. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
    10. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
    11. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
    14. In Search of Lost Time by Marcel Proust
    18. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia-Marquez
    20. The Stranger by Albert Camus
    29. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
    33. The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner
    34. Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
    36. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    38. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
    40. The Trial by Franz Kafka
    42. Shahnameh by Ferdowsi
    44. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
    58. Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
    62. Notes from Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
    66. Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift
    72. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
    74. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
    77. 1984 by George Orwell
    80. Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
    81. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    88. If on a winter’s night a traveler by Italo Calvino
    89. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
    92. The Castle by Franz Kafka

    28/100.

  3. #153
    Registered User EmptySeraph's Avatar
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    I've read:

    1. The Bible
    2. Hamlet by William Shakespeare
    3. The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri
    4. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    5. The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
    6. Ulysses by James Joyce
    7. Moby-Dick by Herman Melville
    8. Don Quixote by Cervantes
    9. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
    10. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
    11. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
    12. The Odyssey by Homer
    13. Paradise Lost by John Milton
    14. In Search of Lost Time by Marcel Proust
    15. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
    16. Les Fleurs du mal by Charles Baudelaire
    17. The Illiad by Homer
    18. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia-Marquez
    19. Essays by Montaigne
    20. The Stranger by Albert Camus
    21. The Oresteia by Aeschylus
    22. Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
    23. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
    25. Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
    26. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    28. Emma by Jane Austen
    29. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
    30. The Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio
    31. Eugene Onegin by Pushkin
    33. The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner
    34. Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
    35. Walden by Henry David Thoreau
    36. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    37. Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
    38. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
    39. Tess of the d’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
    40. The Trial by Franz Kafka
    43. The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
    44. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
    45. Fictions by J.L. Borges
    46. El Aleph by J.L. Borges
    47. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
    48. Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    49. The Magus by John Fowles
    50. Life and Fate by Vasily Grossman
    54. Thus Spoke Zarathustra by Friedrich Nietzsche
    55. Oedipus the King by Sophocles
    57. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
    58. Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
    59. The Marriage of Heaven and Hell by William Blake
    60. Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
    62. Notes from Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
    63. Tropic of Cancer by Henry Miller
    64. No Exit by Jean-Paul Sartre
    65. Othello by William Shakespeare
    66. Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift
    67. Vanity Fair by William Thackerey
    68. Resurrection by Leo Tolstoy
    70. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
    71. Manfred by Lord Byron
    72. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
    73. Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy
    74. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
    75. Outer Dark by Cormac McCarthy
    76. Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurty
    77. 1984 by George Orwell
    78. Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
    80. Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
    81. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    82. Tristam Shandy by Laurence Sterne
    83. The Tree of Man by Patrick White
    84. The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
    85. Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
    86. 2666 by Robert Bolano
    87. Cosmicomics by Italo Calvino
    88. If on a winter’s night a traveler by Italo Calvino
    90. The Arrow of Gold by Joseph Conrad
    91. The Recognitions by William Gaddis
    92. The Castle by Franz Kafka
    93. I Canti by Giacomo Leopardi
    94. Man’s Fate by André Malraux
    95. Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
    97. Portnoy’s Complaint by Philip Roth
    98. Confessions by Rousseau
    99. The World as Will and Representation by Arthur Schopenhauer
    100. Julius Caesar by Shakespeare

    The list borders half on the preposterous, and the other half is just indecent.

  4. #154
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    When is there going to be a revote?
    "History is the nightmare from which I am trying to awake"-Stephen Dedalus

  5. #155
    Left 4evr Adolescent09's Avatar
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    Even though I am a Christian, the Bible at #1 seems a bit biased considering most people here haven't read it all let alone the other timeless religious texts (Torah, Quran, Book of the Dead, te Ching etc)... but if it is listed in accordance with sales and impact it makes sense.

    I have read only 30 of the books but there is not enough non-fiction. Where is Herodotus, Plato, Thucydides, Augustine, Darwin, Euripides etc..?

    The following is just my opinion:

    Les Miserables is in my top 5, To Kill a Mockingbird should only be at 75+ and even that is being generous, if Slaughterhouse Five is on the list so should Elie Wiesel's 'Night'. Lolita is great but definitely overrated. Jane Eyre should be a little higher. Vanity Fair should be higher.

    Crime and Punishment is definitely better than Moby-Dick. Melville's masterpiece although poetic, harrowing and visceral is absolutely no match for Dostoevsky's mental transplant of Raskolinikov's torture into the mind of the reader. The reader BECOMES Raskolinikov, in a very similar way that the reader BECOMES Prince Myshkin (why the heck isn't The Idiot on this list by the way? It's on a par with Crime and Punishment.)

    If we are going by impact (as is clearly being done with the first book on the list) ironically the last book on the list along with Romeo & Juliet and King Lear should be higher up.

    Oh, and The Grapes of Wrath was way better than Of Mice and Men. Of Mice and Men is foisted on reluctant high school readers along the lines of The Catcher in the Rye, To Kill a Mockingbird, Atlas Shrugged etc..

    ...and Lord of the Rings? like seriously? That's middle-school reading.
    Last edited by Adolescent09; 01-05-2017 at 02:08 AM.
    My hide hides the heart inside

  6. #156
    Registered User RetsixArp's Avatar
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    I have never actually read the Bible; I have listened to the unabridged 60+-CD set of the KJV 2+ dozen times. Narrator: American actor Alexander Scourby*, who made the recording for the American Foundation for the Blind during 4-yr period, ending in 1953. First full recording of the Bible issued on LP records. I recalled a h.s. English teacher playing parts of it for her class. Had the CD set for several years before I slipped disc 1 into the car CD player, listening on my until recently lengthy commutes.

    Ditto Joyce's Ulysses. Coincidently, there's a cite early in the novel where Joyce wrote about leaving one's (grandpa's) audio legacy.
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    *If you want to see actor Scourby in action, he appeared as Gen. Harper in a Twilight Zone episode called The Last Flight.
    No American troops were harmed during the Watergate cover-up.

  7. #157
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    [QUOTE=Adolescent09;1333015]
    I have read only 30 of the books but there is not enough non-fiction. Where is Herodotus, Plato, Thucydides, Augustine, Darwin, Euripides etc..?

    I've read 32, but I have the same problem, including the "etc."

    "Crime and Punishment" and "Moby Dick" both belong on the list. "Atlas Shrugged" is much too long for high school readers.

  8. #158
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    I've read:

    1. The Bible (well, about half of it)
    4. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    23. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad (did not enjoy at all)
    26. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    32. Watership Down by Richard Adams (I've exchanged letters with Richard Adams.)
    35. Walden by Henry David Thoreau
    36. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    41. Lord of the Rings by J.R.R Tolkien
    44. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert (Lydia Davis's 2012 translation)
    47. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
    56. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
    57. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
    70. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
    72. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
    74. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
    80. Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
    89. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie


    17/100.

  9. #159
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    I think it was as good a list as any. Nobody would be ashamed of reading most of these and being able to think and speak about them. But it has been here a few years. Maybe it needs refreshed.

  10. #160
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    Not sure if the Bible can be ranked as one? It very rarely influences modern Christian society, is not practiced and has not had the cultural, societal and legal impact of other religious texts, in particular something like the Quran, which has a far greater historical and current impact.

    I have looked down the rest of the list and found some really good choices and some that I personally disagree with...then again that is the problem with being subjective.

    I do like the inclusion of "The murder of Roger Akroyd", as Christie is such an underrated writer.

    So this has been my first contribution to the site

    Hi everyone haha

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