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Thread: 13 New Authors Reading Challenge

  1. #61
    The Poetic Warrior Dark Muse's Avatar
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    1. The Bone People by Keri Hulme 9/10
    2. Attila by William Napier 8/10
    3. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey 9/10
    4. My Uncle Napoleon by Iraj Pezeshkzad 8/10
    5. The Borgia Bride by Jeanne Kalogridis 8/10
    6.The Black Dahlia by James Ellroy 6/10
    7. Poodle Springs by Ramond Chandler 8/10
    8. Prophecy: Clash of Kings by M.K. Hume 6/10

    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. ~ Edgar Allan Poe

  2. #62
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    1. The Bone People by Keri Hulme 9/10
    2. Attila by William Napier 8/10
    3. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey 9/10
    4. My Uncle Napoleon by Iraj Pezeshkzad 8/10
    5. The Borgia Bride by Jeanne Kalogridis 8/10
    6.The Black Dahlia by James Ellroy 6/10
    7. Poodle Springs by Ramond Chandler 8/10
    8. Prophecy: Clash of Kings by M.K. Hume 6/10
    9. Spirit of Lost Angels by Lisa Perrat 5.75/10

    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. ~ Edgar Allan Poe

  3. #63
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    1. The Golden Notebook: 7.5/10. Shaky ending.
    2. Lady Chatterley's Lover: 6/10. Too ideological.
    3. Of Human Bondage: 8/10. Deeply passionate and humane.
    4. A Passage to India: 7/10. Adeptly written.
    5. Ivanhoe: 4/10. Simple-minded.
    6. The Oresteia: 5.5/10. Hard to judge, but ultimately not too moving.
    7. Theban plays: 6/10. Slightly better than the Oresteia.
    8. Medea: 6.5/10. The most psychological of the Greek tragedies.
    9. Lysistrata: 5/10. Must be hard to translate.
    10. The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle: 6/10. Too chaotic to achieve much.
    11. The Tale of the Heike: 7/10. Many small great scenes, but the overarching narrative was a beast to follow.
    12. Kokoro: 5.5/10. Apathetically narrated.
    13. Snow Country: 8.5/10. Brilliantly dealt with ambiguous emotions in a precise way.
    14. The Makioka Sisters: 7.5/10. Touching occasionally, but also simply a little dull.
    15. The Narrow Road to the Deep North: 5/10. Again, must be hard to translate.

  4. #64
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    1. The Bone People by Keri Hulme 9/10
    2. Attila by William Napier 8/10
    3. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey 9/10
    4. My Uncle Napoleon by Iraj Pezeshkzad 8/10
    5. The Borgia Bride by Jeanne Kalogridis 8/10
    6.The Black Dahlia by James Ellroy 6/10
    7. Poodle Springs by Ramond Chandler 8/10
    8. Prophecy: Clash of Kings by M.K. Hume 6/10
    9. Spirit of Lost Angels by Lisa Perrat 5.75/10
    10. The Master by Colm Toibin 6/10

    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. ~ Edgar Allan Poe

  5. #65
    Aspects of the Novel E.M. Forster
    The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter Carson McCullers
    Inheritance of Loss Kiran Desai
    Blindness of the Heart Julia Franck.

    After a break for some Faulkner, adding:
    Awakening by Kate Chopin (3/4)
    Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward (3/4)
    Bastard out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison (3/4)

  6. #66
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    1. The Silver Linings Playbook by Matthew Quick
    2. Beautiful Creatures by Garcia/Stohl
    3. Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion
    4. Then We Came To The End by Joshua Ferris
    5. Room by Emma Donoghue
    6. Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln by Doris Kearns Goodwin
    7. Touching the Surface by Kimberly Sabatini
    8. The Further Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Greg Matthews
    9. In Cold Blood by Truman Capote
    10. World's End by T.C. Boyle
    11. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
    12. John Adams by David McCullough
    13. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
    14. Looking for Alaska by John Green
    15. Johannes Cabal The Necromancer by Jonathan L. Howard
    16. Shogun by James Clavell

  7. #67
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    1. The Bone People by Keri Hulme 9/10
    2. Attila by William Napier 8/10
    3. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey 9/10
    4. My Uncle Napoleon by Iraj Pezeshkzad 8/10
    5. The Borgia Bride by Jeanne Kalogridis 8/10
    6.The Black Dahlia by James Ellroy 6/10
    7. Poodle Springs by Ramond Chandler 8/10
    8. Prophecy: Clash of Kings by M.K. Hume 6/10
    9. Spirit of Lost Angels by Lisa Perrat 5.75/10
    10. The Master by Colm Toibin 6/10

    11. The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield 9/10

    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. ~ Edgar Allan Poe

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by Bustrofedon View Post
    Aspects of the Novel E.M. Forster
    The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter Carson McCullers
    Inheritance of Loss Kiran Desai
    Blindness of the Heart Julia Franck.
    Awakening by Kate Chopin (3/4)
    Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward (3/4)
    Bastard out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison (3/4)
    And now Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse (3/4) Fantastic book.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by coeus View Post
    1. Story of Edgar Sawtelle by David Wroblewski
    2. Silver Linings Playbook by Matthew Quick
    3. John Dies at the End by David Wong
    4. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
    5. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
    6. Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill
    7. The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
    8. The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach
    9. Don't Breath a Word by Jennifer McMahon
    10. Inside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai
    11. Goodbye to a River by John Graves
    12. Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
    13. Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clark
    14. Stories From the Corner by FX Toole
    15. Tinkers by Paul Harding (currently reading)

  10. #70
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    I finished reading the 13 new authors in this year:

    1.Michael Crichton
    2.Isaac Asimov
    3.John Adair
    4.John Keats
    5.Jon Krakauer
    6.James Allen
    7.Ralph Waldo Emerson
    8.Viktor Mayer-Schönberger and Kennetch Cuckier
    9.Lao Tzu
    10.Ayn Rand
    11.Lewis Carroll
    12.Ray Bradbury and
    13.Philip K Dick

  11. #71
    The Poetic Warrior Dark Muse's Avatar
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    1. The Bone People by Keri Hulme 9/10
    2. Attila by William Napier 8/10
    3. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey 9/10
    4. My Uncle Napoleon by Iraj Pezeshkzad 8/10
    5. The Borgia Bride by Jeanne Kalogridis 8/10
    6.The Black Dahlia by James Ellroy 6/10
    7. Poodle Springs by Ramond Chandler 8/10
    8. Prophecy: Clash of Kings by M.K. Hume 6/10
    9. Spirit of Lost Angels by Lisa Perrat 5.75/10
    10. The Master by Colm Toibin 6/10
    11. The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield 9/10
    12. The Midwich Cuckoos by John Wyndham 6.50/10

    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before. ~ Edgar Allan Poe

  12. #72
    Aspects of the Novel E.M. Forster
    The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter Carson McCullers
    Inheritance of Loss Kiran Desai
    Blindness of the Heart Julia Franck.
    Awakening by Kate Chopin (3/4)
    Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward (3/4)
    Bastard out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison (3/4)
    Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse (3/4) Fantastic book.

    adding:
    Infinite Jest David Foster Wallace 4/4
    Fragmented, unresolved (so much so that I keep thinking I am missing the last pages), funny and sad. This is a great one. 981 pages of text with about 100 worth of footnotes and I did not want it to end.

    next:
    something shorter

  13. #73
    Aspects of the Novel E.M. Forster
    The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter Carson McCullers
    Inheritance of Loss Kiran Desai
    Blindness of the Heart Julia Franck.
    Awakening by Kate Chopin
    Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward
    Bastard out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison
    Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse
    Infinite Jest David Foster Wallace

    Finished:
    House of Leaves Mark Danielewski. 3/4. Kind of a mind-jangling book, esp. back-to-back w/ IJ. This one will have to be flipped through again; searching for secrets.

  14. #74
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    Some comments on suggestions so far. Firstly, Poodle Springs is not by Raymond Chandler! He wrote two pages of rough notes for it and then dropped dead. Anyone who enjoyed this book might do well to read any of the seven books he did write about the same character, except the last one, Playback, which is a bit rubbish because he was dying of alcoholism.

    Secondly, somebody said that they were put off reading War And Peace by the feeling that they'd be bored by lengthy descriptions of battles. Many other people think so too, but since all the chapters dealing with the Napoleonic War are self-contained and parallel to the main narrative about a few characters trying to cope with the increasing chaos they find themselves living in, you can skip every chapter that's basically a history lesson without losing any of the main plot - none of those characters appear at all in the historical chapters. Lots of people read the book that way.

    Anyway - some suggestions of my own. Firstly, James Joyce - he really had a way with words! If you're not familiar with him, you might start with Dubliners and move on to Ulysses. Just one word of caution, though - don't even think about going anywhere near Finnegan's Wake. As one reviewer remarked, the second word in the title is missing an "n". Also, to fully appreciate it, you need to have a slightly higher IQ than God. And if you like superb wordplay from the Celtic areas of the UK about a century ago, you might check out Dylan Thomas while you're at it.

    Other British authors who haven't been mentioned yet (guess where I live!) include the recently deceased Iain Banks, whose large output varied quite a bit in both style and quality, but the best of it really is special. You might start with his award-winning first novel The Wasp Factory. By the way, Iain M. Banks was the same guy, but he only used his middle initial when he was writing sci-fi to make it clear which genre you were getting. And what about Steve Aylett? He's not for everybody, but his utterly bizarre books will be greatly appreciated by anybody who loves that kind of incredibly intricate and frequently hilarious wordplay. He's the kind of author who can describe a character having "a near-death experience, immediately followed by death" and get away with it. Also, everybody in the world should be aware of the late, great Ivor Cutler. His work is most easily available on CD, but there are quite a few tiny little books out there as well, if you can find them. "Look son, I've never told you this, but I've some eggs here. I keep them in a box." "Yes mammy, I know, we sometimes have an egg." "No, no, son, this is different eggs. And I feed them meat..."
    What joy! The leech charmers are here!

  15. #75
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    On the one hand I am way late to the party, on the other I just got the "serious reading" bug this summer so I might make it.

    This year:
    1. Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49, first 150 pages of Gravity's Rainbow -- Interesting, but not my cup of tea.
    2. Ron Curie Jr, Everything Matters -- Cheesy at the end, but the end makes the book.
    3. Charles Bukowski, Post Office, Factotum, Ham on Rye, and Women -- Bukowski is Bukowski, I dig it but there is too much other amazing stuff to read to come back now that I have read the essentials.
    4. Louis-Ferdinand Céline, Journey to the end of the night -- Bukowski is also an echo of Céline, but Céline brings a lot more to the table in terms of charachter development and life experiences. The main problem with this book is that the translator gets in the way some times.
    5. Vladimir Nabakov, Lolita -- I came to this book with high expectations, but not high enough. Well written, intense, and, in some ways, surprising. Definitely want to read more of his stuff when I get through the "survey" period of my reading experience.
    6. James Purdy, Cabot Wright Begins -- A writer's writer. I'll stop short of amazing and say "very good." Somewhere between Bukowski and Celine.

    I'm not counting:
    James Joyce, The first 10 pages of Ulysses -- I didn't know what I was getting in to. Tabled for now.

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