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Thread: Does e-reading axe the printed genre?

  1. #1
    Haribol Acharya blazeofglory's Avatar
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    Does e-reading axe the printed genre?

    Fortunately or unfortunately I take a fancy to e-reading for it is easy and simple. I can carry a whole library, for the idea of library is not a physical one. It is virtual, abstract. Books are not just visual, it is audio. Supersonic. I have a number of audio books, though I am increasingly becoming nostalgic about reading books in print.
    The future of books is likely to be paperless, and it is eco-books too we must look to since environment is and should be our great concern if we want to sustain our planetary greeneries.
    Let us discuss e-literature.

    “Those who seek to satisfy the mind of man by hampering it with ceremonies and music and affecting charity and devotion have lost their original nature””

    “If water derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind! The mind of the sage, being in repose, becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation.

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    I agree. And it cuts the cost of shipping to a minimun, not to speak of how much it economizes and makes more Charming available. Paperless is the way of the future, no doubt.

  3. #3
    Registered User Calidore's Avatar
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    E-readers do have obvious storage-space advantages, but are limited by document format and require power, plus the models are constantly upgraded, plus (at least the Kindle) allow the seller to intrude and even delete outright content you've stored. Physical books last as long as the paper does and can be recycled and passed around freely, and language is the only encryption used. Also, nobody's ever been mugged in the subway for their paperback.
    You must be the change you wish to see in the world. -- Mahatma Gandhi

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    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
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    With the Kindle, your books are stored on an account, so damage, theft, and lending are no problem. Also libraries are beginning to lend e-books. There is a cost involved of course if your kindle is stolen, but you might have insurance to cover like a phone.

    I really like my Kindle - it's just fantastic. I still read books though. Also, one effect has been for the booksellers to counter with really nicely designed book covers with thick paper on the inside in the old style. There'll be overlapping for a good while I think.

  5. #5
    In the fog Charles Darnay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulclem View Post
    With the Kindle, your books are stored on an account, so damage, theft, and lending are no problem.
    Except that Kindle has the right to delete/block your entire library whenever it wants. Unless you copy your books into epub form on your computer, you are really just renting books from Kindle/Google/Apple/&c. It is not like owning a collection.

    Of course the eBooks have advantages - which have been discussed extensively here. I have several eBooks and quite like them. As I have mentioned elsewhere, they do not yet to a good job of reproducing certain formats - particularly poetry.

    Also, Umberto Eco made a good point. If you want to read a file that you have stored on a floppy disk, you have to dig out a computer that was made at least ten years ago now (probably more). There will come a time when Kindles will become obsolete. Books have never been like video formats (where you end up buying multiples to keep up with technologies) but that is now what will happen.
    I wrote a poem on a leaf and it blew away...

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    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Darnay View Post
    Except that Kindle has the right to delete/block your entire library whenever it wants. Unless you copy your books into epub form on your computer, you are really just renting books from Kindle/Google/Apple/&c. It is not like owning a collection.

    Of course the eBooks have advantages - which have been discussed extensively here. I have several eBooks and quite like them. As I have mentioned elsewhere, they do not yet to a good job of reproducing certain formats - particularly poetry.

    Also, Umberto Eco made a good point. If you want to read a file that you have stored on a floppy disk, you have to dig out a computer that was made at least ten years ago now (probably more). There will come a time when Kindles will become obsolete. Books have never been like video formats (where you end up buying multiples to keep up with technologies) but that is now what will happen.
    Except that Kindle has the right to delete/block your entire library whenever it wants.

    But why would it? We entrust our money, savings and investments with large companies, so I don't see a problem.

    you are really just renting books from Kindle/Google/Apple

    Why is that? I don't expect to be giving them the e-books back, which is an odd thought anyway seeing as it's just a copy of what they have.

    I take your point about the ever changing tech, and that my current kindle may not be the one i want in future. I don't see storage as a problem though, as it is held in account I can download from.

    I also save about 40% of the top price, though there are outlets that will sell cheaper, and so the saving is less. When I consider that I can finish one book and download another straight away without the need to browse for what I want, then I think it's just brilliant - and it doesn't preclude me from browsing as well we I go up town.
    Last edited by Paulclem; 11-08-2012 at 06:24 PM.

  7. #7
    In the fog Charles Darnay's Avatar
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    I wrote a poem on a leaf and it blew away...

  8. #8
    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
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    Ok - I don't like companies that don't pay tax, but it looks like they - and others have been rumbled. Good.

    As for the woman's experience with the deletion of her account - I've had problems with both BT and Virgin Media, and it seems to be a symptom of large companies that their customer srvice on the complaints sie of things is sadly lacking - of course.
    I know i could have problems with Amazon given unfortunate circumstances, but that is true of other large companies i deal with.

    As for the random deletion of books - well again why would they? Also, once i've read a book i give it away to a charity shop. I rarely re-read anything except the very best, so I don't have a problem with my Kindle. If I want to possess the body of a book - sounds a bit creepy now i re-read it - then I'll buy it and stick it on the shelf. The Kindle serves my purposes as the repository of the everyday books i decide to read, but probably won't revisit.

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    Here's the truth lads. Ain't nothin' like holdin' a fine book twixt your fingers- c'est similiar comme prendre une belle femme in your bras. But books are friggin' heavy. Aesthetically, the romance of the papier is winner, but practically it's all about the e-reader. Dem paper books are a luxury item.







    J


    EDIT: That is to say that portability and minimalism win out, practically speaking.

  10. #10
    Registered User prendrelemick's Avatar
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    I luurve my Kindle, for all the reasons mentioned above.

    I am also coming to believe you get a purer reading experience with a Kindle than with a book. It's all about the words rather than the feel and typeset. Because of the machine's inflexability compared with the book I find I am reading "better"- to go and check something a couple of chapters back is difficult, so you need to absorb it in one take. I found this the greatest problem at first, but my brain is becoming trained and honed ( it's like a steel trap now.)

    The only paper books I read are with my Book Club and I don't find them any more enjoyable because of the paper of media.
    Last edited by prendrelemick; 11-10-2012 at 03:20 AM.
    ay up

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    I don't think that e-reading axe the printed genre. There are still a lot of people who still feel it's nicer to read books the old-fashion way

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    A User, but Registered! tonywalt's Avatar
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    Regarding deletions. I have thousands of ebooks on my hard drive which were gifted to me. Many that i changed to the .mobi format and transferred to Kindle were deleted by Kindle during a software upgrade by Kindle.

  13. #13
    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xtianfriborg13 View Post
    I don't think that e-reading axe the printed genre. There are still a lot of people who still feel it's nicer to read books the old-fashion way
    They do, but it is merely a habit formed by years of reading. It is not inherent to the reading experience. What will happen in future is that people who read screens and e-readers will not like the feel of a book by comparison due to their personal experience.It's just a habit. Most people will become comfortable with both.

    Quote Originally Posted by tonywalt View Post
    Regarding deletions. I have thousands of ebooks on my hard drive which were gifted to me. Many that i changed to the .mobi format and transferred to Kindle were deleted by Kindle during a software upgrade by Kindle.
    Are you going to follow it up?

  14. #14
    A User, but Registered! tonywalt's Avatar
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    Are you going to follow it up?
    I think they are trying to crack down File Sharing (which is more and more prevalent), so it's a pointless effort.

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    Registered User Joreads's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Darnay View Post
    Wow thanks for this. I have a Kindle and I love it. I had never thought about what would happen if Amazon decided to close my account.
    I am back............................

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