Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20

Thread: Philosophy of Death?

  1. #1

    Philosophy of Death?

    HI guys, I'm new here but looking forward to getting involved in the community. I'm a second-year phd student working on a dissertation on contemporary American poetry.

    At the moment I'm working on a chapter of my thesis that discusses elegy poetry - and how women factor into that genre. I was wondering if anyone on here could recommend me some texts on the philosophy of death or psychology of mourning? I'm familiar with Freudian theories on death (Mourning and Melancholia), Nietzsche and the like - but was wondering if you guys could suggest any others?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Coventry, West Midlands
    Posts
    6,236
    Blog Entries
    36
    I know little about American poetry, but there are the reicarntional religious philosophies such as Buddhism and Hinduism. The most obvious link I can think of is Eliot in the Wasteland, though I wouldn't know idf this was reflected in contemporary poets. Perhaps Leonard Cohen hs done some - he was a Zen Monk for a while.

  3. #3
    Reading the Phaedo seems fundamentally necessary.






    J

  4. #4
    confidentially pleased cacian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    London
    Posts
    9,183
    I do not know anything about this topic but I was wondering if anyone here know the difference between ''assassination'' and ''being killed''?
    since the title of the thread is about the philosophy of death I was wondering if this is ever discussed in this topic.
    I did ask once about the difference between committing an act of suicide and killing one's self.
    It is not clear where the differences stand.
    I hope you do notmind me adding this.
    Thanks!!
    it may never try
    but when it does it sigh
    it is just that
    good
    it fly

  5. #5
    Watching You RicMisc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Somewhere Dutch
    Posts
    395
    Quote Originally Posted by cacian View Post
    I do not know anything about this topic but I was wondering if anyone here know the difference between ''assassination'' and ''being killed''?
    since the title of the thread is about the philosophy of death I was wondering if this is ever discussed in this topic.
    I did ask once about the difference between committing an act of suicide and killing one's self.
    It is not clear where the differences stand.
    I hope you do notmind me adding this.
    Thanks!!
    Well, I cannot say I am a linguistic expert but I'll give you my 2 cents on the topic. To me 'being killed' is exactly what it means; actually being killed. It doesn't matter by whom, just killed by another person or animal.

    'Assasination' to me is something more specific. It brings to mind pictures of people dressed in black tredding the night and shadows to kill someone. So I would say assasination is more like a hit, in my mind at least.

    'Being killed' can be used more generally, it refers to someone leaving life due to another killing him (for whatever reason, could even be an animal). Assasination would be more specific, I would say it refers more to someone leaving life due to someone paid to kill him.

    While writing this I have come to realise that these two words are not so very different from each other as I had previously thought since what I have stated might not be whole truths.

    To cover for myself, I'd like to add that this is from my point of view. If I were to write something I would use the two words like this.

    Now I just hope that what I've said is still somewhat cohesive since that seems to be hard for me when writing in English lol.
    So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past - The Great Gatsby

    Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice - Polonius (Hamlet)

  6. #6
    Justifiably inexcusable DocHeart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    684
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack of Hearts View Post
    Reading the Phaedo seems fundamentally necessary.






    J

    That is good advice from my friend Jack. It is a relatively short text, too, and beautifully written. You might not find Plato's (Socrates') syllogisms convincing (I certainly never did), but I understand you're looking for attitudes towards the subject besides arguments.

    I've mentioned Matters of Life and Death (Regan et al) in these fora before for another reason. You've probably read it already. If not, I would definitely add it to the list. The second chapter, "The Right to Die", goes well beyond issues regarding euthanasia and should be of particular relevance to your work.

    Good luck!

    DH
    Of all the gin joints in all the towns in all the world, she walks into mine...

  7. #7
    Registered User Des Essientes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Milky Way
    Posts
    119
    The greatest philosopher of death in the 20th Century was surely Martin Heidegger. See his philosophy of Being-Towards-Death in the Second Division of Being and Time.

  8. #8
    Unregistered User
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Remiss, at times.
    Posts
    448
    Following what Paul said about Eliot, I would imagine that Hart Crane might afford you something interesting. He tried to be more optimistic in his poetry than Eliot was but ended up committing suicide at the age of 32 (as I'm sure you already know). He appears to have been manic-depressive. I don't know of him writing any elegies as such, though I do know of one that was written for him. Also, he was a homosexual, which might discount him; although this might be construed as a manifestation of some latent tendency to exclude women from poetry...but I'm not sure if I would even touch that one. Moreover, as a boy he had a homosexual relationship with an older man--I'm not quite sure on the finer details of the affair. Anyway, such a relationship seems decidedly Ancient Greek, possibly tying in with Plato. But following that idea of homosexuality and exclusion, the opinions and theories of Oscar Wilde would appear to be the next logical step...or rather the prior step. Hope something here helps.
    Dare to know

  9. #9
    Just as in early life, men, no realizing they are going to die, develop fantasies about how much control over life they have, in late life, realizing that they are going to die, develop another fantasy about control over death. That's what a philosophy of death is about.

  10. #10
    Registered User Des Essientes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Milky Way
    Posts
    119
    Heidegger's philosophy of death is not a fantasy about controling death. It is acknowledging the fact that death is inevitable and thus becoming Being-Towards-Death. It is deciding to, as the country-rock tune puts it, "live like you were dying". When a person is acutely aware of their mortality they don't bumble about and waste time, nor do they act in thoughtless ways.
    Heidegger reminds us that death is the one possibility that negates all other possibilities and so the choice to die is the greatest choice a man can make. Given the obvious fact that we didn't choose to be born and were instead thrown into life, those who refuse to be thrown out of life, but instead die at a time of their own choosing, are, seen from this philosophical perspective, heroic. There is an interesting character named Kilrilov in Doestoyevsky's novel "The Possessed" that believed suicide even transcended mere heroism and actually imparted divinity!

  11. #11
    Original Poster Buh4Bee's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    work, work, work
    Posts
    3,297
    Blog Entries
    150

  12. #12
    very nice .this is a goods ide
    <a href="www.replica-buyer.com">cheap china replica</a>from replica-buyer

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Des Essientes View Post
    Heidegger's philosophy of death is not a fantasy about controling death. It is acknowledging the fact that death is inevitable and thus becoming Being-Towards-Death. It is deciding to, as the country-rock tune puts it, "live like you were dying". When a person is acutely aware of their mortality they don't bumble about and waste time, nor do they act in thoughtless ways.
    These idea are not new to Heidegger - they go back to Epicurus and the Stoics - and these Ancient writers are much easier to understand than Heidegger! Check out "What is ancient Philosophy?" by Pierre Hadot for starters.

    Also, Heidegger uses an overly complex language to express platitudes and the ideas of other philosophers. I mean "Being-Towards-Death". Come on! Who uses language like that? Trite, meaningless, over-complicated... The age of modernist obfuscation is over, it's time to read readable philosophers again...

    Quote Originally Posted by Des Essientes View Post
    Heidegger reminds us that death is the one possibility that negates all other possibilities and so the choice to die is the greatest choice a man can make.
    To paraphrase Montaigne, you don't have any choice in it, mate. If you are worried about death, don't worry, death will soon teach you about death. (Montaigne is wonderful on the subject of death.)

  14. #14
    Registered User Denizen's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    England
    Posts
    5
    Perhaps you should research different religious views on eschatology?

  15. #15
    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Coventry, West Midlands
    Posts
    6,236
    Blog Entries
    36
    Denizen - is that picture the frontspiece of The Last Man by Mary Shelley? I have the book somewhere.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Nihilism
    By hyperborean in forum Philosophical Literature
    Replies: 108
    Last Post: 12-08-2013, 04:11 AM
  2. When does philosophy become drivel and why?
    By Vautrin in forum Philosophical Literature
    Replies: 204
    Last Post: 11-04-2010, 11:29 AM
  3. What does philosophy do?
    By coberst in forum Philosophical Literature
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 12-17-2009, 07:03 AM
  4. O death where is thy sting?
    By jikan myshkin in forum Personal Poetry
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-30-2009, 03:52 AM
  5. Why is Philosophy like General Motors?
    By coberst in forum Philosophical Literature
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 06-03-2009, 12:04 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •