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Thread: My writing problem!

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by ashthehunk View Post
    Thanks friend
    I will try the book.

    Name few more of those books if you can.
    http://www.amazon.com/How-Write-Refl...e=UTF8&s=books

    You could try this one. I haven't read it, but I read another book full of quotes from writers giving advice on writing and Rhodes's quote is the only one that really stuck with me.

    It's what he calls the Knickerbocker rule. In response to the question "how do you write?" the rule is: "apply butt to chair."

    To me this rule says that writing is work. Hard work, and you need the attitude of a laborer if you really want progress as a writer.

  2. #17
    Like: short stories 1) Your cool idea on a new drug 2) Your cool idea on main character 3) Your cool idea of a villain. 4) Your cool idea on 'secret' military weaponry. 5) Your love interest between hero and villain's daughter.

    My issue was 'how big is 100,000 words?

    It is about that big. Each idea gets like a 20,000 word treatment throughout. You can tell the story in a WW1 trench on one night, or try and tell the story of WW1.

    Everyone has their own taste. I think a writer should have a good feeling for how 'big' a word count is and what you would use it for.

    A 'short story' really implies all the house cleaning writing. I mean more like 'cool ideas'. A cool idea would be something you go, "I could make a book on this cool idea." My answer is, no, you really shouldn't. Get that idea plus 3-4 more equally good ideas you can blend in. That is stagecraft to me. Like Gypsy town in Wolfman. That is a lot of housekeeping word count to 'describe gypsy caravan town'. Having described it, you should have a couple of scenes there. If you are going to build a set out of words, make use of it.

  3. #18
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    One important thing I always keep in mind when writing is that first drafts are always going to be bad. As long as you get across the story your trying to tell in some coherent fashion it doesn't matter what it says, that's what the rewrite is for, developing on the story and making it into something that people might want to read.
    "Mere flim-flam stories, and nothing but shams and lies." - Sancho Panza, in Don Quixote, pt. 1, bk. 3, ch. 11 (1605)

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Sancho Panza View Post
    One important thing I always keep in mind when writing is that first drafts are always going to be bad. As long as you get across the story your trying to tell in some coherent fashion it doesn't matter what it says, that's what the rewrite is for, developing on the story and making it into something that people might want to read.
    First draft may be raw but it need not be poor
    There are many who write on the spot with same brilliance and genius.
    Of course it comes with practice and also depends on how wide a reader you are.
    It asks for knowledge on substantive issues and an observant eye.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by duncklee5 View Post
    Guys i read all your comments and find all comments very informative,all of you gave a nice tips here basically writing is not a big problem the problem is that we dont the basic way of writing,as the main thing is that you must pay attention to punctuation, especially to the correct use of commas and periods. These two punctuation marks regulate the flow of your thoughts, and they can make your text confusing even if the words are clear.Hope you understand it start by this tip you see that you automatically start writing by your self.
    For more info visit here
    Punctuation is important but i think more important is the content in between those punctuation marks.

  6. #21
    Registered User Delta40's Avatar
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    Don't overlook punctuation! Of course content is important but I believe this discussion has been had in another thread. Grammar and punctuation are part of the story you create. Consider them as one package.

    Another thing to keep in mind when comparing oneself with published authors - they often have paid editors and I suspect some even employ the services of ghost writers. Concentrate on your own craft. Comparison can be disheartening in a very big way.
    The Rotten Apple Injures its Neighbour

  7. #22
    I know what you went through dude! And getting feed back in the wrong places can be self-sabotage because as writers, we have somewhat of a stigma. So I've noticed. For instance, say you love a book and your best buddy doesn't. Well it's just not his thing, and the truth is, what you write isn't going to be for everyone. SO when someone tells you your book is horrible, just shrug it off as their opinion. Don't be pig headed, but if you love to write, you'll do your research on how to write a good book, how to structure it, and how to execute it. Remember, the internet and forums are loaded with trolls ready to bash anything they get their hands on. Editors are only interested in stuff that is going to sell, so if you're pitching a zombie book in sparkly vampire season, good luck. A lot of the success depends on timing, quality, and who you know.

    The best way to sell any book is via book signings. However, it costs money to travel across the nation. So, my best advice is write what entertains you because if you can't entertain yourself, you're not going to be able to entertain anyone else. AND LOVE YOUR WORK and strive for constant improvement!
    Michael S Bearre

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by michaelsbearre View Post
    I know what you went through dude! And getting feed back in the wrong places can be self-sabotage because as writers, we have somewhat of a stigma. So I've noticed. For instance, say you love a book and your best buddy doesn't. Well it's just not his thing, and the truth is, what you write isn't going to be for everyone. SO when someone tells you your book is horrible, just shrug it off as their opinion. Don't be pig headed, but if you love to write, you'll do your research on how to write a good book, how to structure it, and how to execute it. Remember, the internet and forums are loaded with trolls ready to bash anything they get their hands on. Editors are only interested in stuff that is going to sell, so if you're pitching a zombie book in sparkly vampire season, good luck. A lot of the success depends on timing, quality, and who you know.

    The best way to sell any book is via book signings. However, it costs money to travel across the nation. So, my best advice is write what entertains you because if you can't entertain yourself, you're not going to be able to entertain anyone else. AND LOVE YOUR WORK and strive for constant improvement!
    I agree with you.
    finding a reply or feedback at the wrong place will certainly have a negative impact.
    Not only the reviews will be negative but the correction these reviewers will propose will have negative learning value.
    I think best way of judging your creation is to give it to someone who doesn't know you but has a good knowledge about things.
    The place where you can get it all is a literary forum.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamCrackers View Post
    Like: short stories 1) Your cool idea on a new drug 2) Your cool idea on main character 3) Your cool idea of a villain. 4) Your cool idea on 'secret' military weaponry. 5) Your love interest between hero and villain's daughter.

    My issue was 'how big is 100,000 words?

    It is about that big. Each idea gets like a 20,000 word treatment throughout. You can tell the story in a WW1 trench on one night, or try and tell the story of WW1.

    Everyone has their own taste. I think a writer should have a good feeling for how 'big' a word count is and what you would use it for.

    A 'short story' really implies all the house cleaning writing. I mean more like 'cool ideas'. A cool idea would be something you go, "I could make a book on this cool idea." My answer is, no, you really shouldn't. Get that idea plus 3-4 more equally good ideas you can blend in. That is stagecraft to me. Like Gypsy town in Wolfman. That is a lot of housekeeping word count to 'describe gypsy caravan town'. Having described it, you should have a couple of scenes there. If you are going to build a set out of words, make use of it.
    But I have a question, how can you write about being in a WW1 trench. Personally I was born in 1992, never fought in any war, and have never had to shoot men and be shot at by men. I know the power of imagination and all that stuff, but I find it extremely difficult to write about something I have never experienced.

    For instance once I wrote a piece about cocaine, and then a couple of months later I actually tried it, and I looked back on the piece and it was ridiculous because it was so detached from reality.

    Were I or you to write a piece on WWI, any person who has actually been a soldier would most likely find it ridiculous.

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