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View Poll Results: TV dinners?

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  • Aye.

    10 43.48%
  • Unwilling aye.

    2 8.70%
  • Nay.

    10 43.48%
  • Who cares?

    1 4.35%
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Thread: TV Dinners: Aye or Nay?

  1. #16
    Piglet RJbibliophil's Avatar
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    I don't suppose frozen peas count?
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  2. #17
    BadWoolf JuniperWoolf's Avatar
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    Cheap food, yes please. I have a problem eating the meat sometimes, although I prefer not to eat any meat that wasn't killed by someone I know. I'm spoiled in that way.
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  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JuniperWoolf View Post
    Cheap food, yes please. I have a problem eating the meat sometimes, although I prefer not to eat any meat that wasn't killed by someone I know. I'm spoiled in that way.
    That would be an ideal situation for me, as I do eat meat. Having the beef and chicken come from someone who I know humanely killed the animal would be much better.

  4. #19
    Internal nebulae TheFifthElement's Avatar
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    Sometimes. I generally prefer home cooked food, but my husband does most of the cooking and he does a bit of a blend. So we will sometimes have fish fingers (which I love - fish finger butties with red sauce. Yummee) and frozen burgers but not much else in frozen foods, and sometimes we'll get one of those ready meal curry takeaway thingies from Tesco which have a couple of curries and rice and naan and onion bhaji, but we don't have those very often. Actually since we moved house 8 years ago, we don't often have takeaway either, though we've developed a mean range of home takeaway food - I do pizza (including home made base), my hubby does an excellent chicken fried rice, and I make a decent curry but to do it properly can take a lot of time unless you make a bit batch of curry sauce base and freeze it all. I'm not that organised for all that.
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  5. #20
    Pièce de Résistance Scheherazade's Avatar
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    I understand why many are against the idea of frozen meals as I share their concerns; however, there are extreme situations that I end up opting for a quick and easy dinner. I usually plan the meals weekly and shop accordingly in advance and I do enjoy cooking (and do so regularly) but sometimes I simply could not manage so there are always couple of frozen emergency packages ready in my freezer.

    Truth be told, I don't see why frozen meals are worse than beans-on-toast or take aways. Some of those meals are rather wholesome. They are not my first choice but I'd prefer them to fish and chips.

    I also tend to freeze pasta sauces and ground beef to defrost on lazy days and would like to hear other ideas... Which reminds me: Papaya had given me an excellent recipe for a chicken dish which could also be frozen and I lost it. :-/
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  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Paulclem View Post
    In the supermarkets I go to they're called "Ready Meals". They have a dinner for 1 or 2 in them, and some of them look pretty good.

    The Old Auntie orders them from a company that supplies frozen ready meals to old folks who can't get about, or who can no longer stand to do cooking etc. She says they are very good, but also tries different ones from Marks and Spencers.

    I'd certainly eat them, but you can probably guess that I'd eat most things bar the meat. They do look as though they've improved though. I was looking at a pasta one with a sauce and cheese today for 2. It looked really nice.

    It's worth remembering that it's fine to be picky whilst you're mobile and independant, but there may well come a time when ready meals will be the hot food you eat. Hopefully not for a long long time yet.
    Does someone come over and cook (heat up) those ready meals for the old folks then or do they just come through the post? I don't really see the difference with such ready meals over something you could get for much cheaper in the supermarkets. Is it just a case of this company being a sort of 'middle man' ready meal dealer if they don't come over?

    I still can't see why someone couldn't stick a potato in the oven or heat up some beans though. Can't be any harder than operating a microwave with the ready meals, if they don't come over that is (and if they do why can't they cook?).

    I don't suppose frozen peas count?
    Definitely not, there's nothing wrong with frozen veg, in fact the odds are they contain more nutrients than fresh veg if it's not that fresh. Some veg can lose up to half of its goodness within an hour or two, as is commonly known.

    A good general rule of thumb when it comes to packet food is to look at the list of ingredients. If it contains more than 50, 000, avoid. Same with bread, if you happen to be one of those heathens who by branded sliced bread take a look at the ingredients right now and then compare them with what should be in bread: flour, water, yeast and salt. It's not even the ingredients in heathen bread that's the issue though, it's in the way it's processed which erodes both taste and nutrients. Cavemen ate better. No offense.

    Truth be told, I don't see why frozen meals are worse than beans-on-toast or take aways. Some of those meals are rather wholesome. They are not my first choice but I'd prefer them to fish and chips.
    Have you taken the 50, 000 test?

    True take aways can be bad, fattening, but at least they are freshly prepared and are fine on rare occasions. Personally I only eat fish and chips on the coast which is once or twice a year.
    Last edited by LitNetIsGreat; 02-24-2012 at 02:54 PM.

  7. #22
    www.markbastable.co.uk MarkBastable's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JuniperWoolf View Post
    I have a problem eating the meat sometimes, although I prefer not to eat any meat that wasn't killed by someone I know.
    That sentence is a lot more fun to read if you skip 'killed by'.
    Last edited by MarkBastable; 02-24-2012 at 05:35 PM.
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  8. #23
    riding a cosmic vortex MystyrMystyry's Avatar
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    Definitely not, there's nothing wrong with frozen veg, in fact the odds are they contain more nutrients than fresh veg if it's not that fresh. Some veg can lose up to half of its goodness within an hour or two, as is commonly known.

    Are you suggesting the pickers are towing a vat of liquid nitrogen amongst the vines so that the second they're picked they're dropped in and deep frozen?

    This is the actual argument against - you don't know how many days they've been sitting around the factory floor before they've been dipped, and for the privilege of this 'convenience', a little overpricing.

    1 grocers potato: 20 cents, 1 pack of frozen chips (containing about two potatoes): 3 bucks 50 (give or take). It's a rip off industry which along with frankenstein food should be boycotted back to hell.

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by MystyrMystyry View Post
    Definitely not, there's nothing wrong with frozen veg, in fact the odds are they contain more nutrients than fresh veg if it's not that fresh. Some veg can lose up to half of its goodness within an hour or two, as is commonly known.

    Are you suggesting the pickers are towing a vat of liquid nitrogen amongst the vines so that the second they're picked they're dropped in and deep frozen?

    This is the actual argument against - you don't know how many days they've been sitting around the factory floor before they've been dipped, and for the privilege of this 'convenience', a little overpricing.

    1 grocers potato: 20 cents, 1 pack of frozen chips (containing about two potatoes): 3 bucks 50 (give or take). It's a rip off industry which along with frankenstein food should be boycotted back to hell.
    Not if you buy frozen peas that are frozen within 1-2 hours of being picked. That way they retain all their nutrients. I thought this was common knowledge. Many of the top nutritionists recommend frozen peas above fresh peas because the pea is one veg that quickly loses nutrition. Yes better to pick them from the garden and serve them immediately if you are lucky enough to grow them (my small pea crop failed this year), just one minute in boiling water, but other than that on this occasion, frozen is better than fresh if it is over 2-3 hours old.

    I agree with your last point.

    Edit: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...her-fresh.html
    Daily mail article on the subject.
    Last edited by LitNetIsGreat; 02-24-2012 at 05:43 PM.

  10. #25
    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neely View Post
    Does someone come over and cook (heat up) those ready meals for the old folks then or do they just come through the post? I don't really see the difference with such ready meals over something you could get for much cheaper in the supermarkets. Is it just a case of this company being a sort of 'middle man' ready meal dealer if they don't come over?

    I still can't see why someone couldn't stick a potato in the oven or heat up some beans though. Can't be any harder than operating a microwave with the ready meals, if they don't come over that is (and if they do why can't they cook?).
    The meals are delivered weekly by a friendly delivery person who will pop it into the freezer for them. They make, pack and deliver.

    It's true that the supermarkets are cheaper, but the old Auntie - who's 89, (though she claims to be 84), has difficulty walking now and so can't get out to the supermarket with my wife much. My wife still picks up frozen meals for her - usually from Marks. The extra cost is no problem for the Auntie - the conveniance compensates and she spends very little on much else. She likes them, and that's the main thing.

    Until the last couple of years she used to cook, but her hands are weaker and she can't hold a knife to peel. We've recently got her an easier microwave to use, as bending down to the oven is now a problem for her. The microwave is at least on an easy level.

    She remains a private person with just a cleaner coming twice a week, and us doing the shopping for her. The ready meals, which she chooses herself, help her to retain a bit of independance, as all she has to do is pop them in for a few minutes. All things considered, she's doing well.

    It looks like we'll be living until our 90s/100s with improved health etc. I wonder if we'll be as independant, or whether those extra years will be stuck in a bed like Charlie Bucket's Grandparents. (We often threaten the Mother in Law with this and take great glee in selecting "suitable" people to share the big Bucket family bed).

  11. #26
    Registered User Emil Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neely View Post
    Not if you buy frozen peas that are frozen within 1-2 hours of being picked. That way they retain all their nutrients. I thought this was common knowledge. Many of the top nutritionists recommend frozen peas above fresh peas because the pea is one veg that quickly loses nutrition. Yes better to pick them from the garden and serve them immediately if you are lucky enough to grow them (my small pea crop failed this year), just one minute in boiling water, but other than that on this occasion, frozen is better than fresh if it is over 2-3 hours old.

    I agree with your last point.

    Edit: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...her-fresh.html
    Daily mail article on the subject.
    What amazes me is why anyone born north of Watford would quote the Daily Mail.
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  12. #27
    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
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    Have you seen this in the news today? Apart from the spin on veggies and meat, it's an interesting development. Cultured meat. It's coming your way soon in a bun.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17113214

  13. #28
    riding a cosmic vortex MystyrMystyry's Avatar
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    Interesting that that study was commissioned by gasp Birdseye who at last glimpse were the originators of the snapfrozen procedure. Must be scared of falling marketshare - any publicity etc, probably a paid advertorial thingy...

    It's a crock!

    Frankenstein meat is a horror - I think I'll wait until they adopt Douglas Adams idea of breeding an animal who sincerely wants to be eaten.


    [Edit: sorry, my sympathies for your pea crop Neely]
    Last edited by MystyrMystyry; 02-24-2012 at 06:36 PM.

  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Emil Miller View Post
    What amazes me is why anyone born north of Watford would quote the Daily Mail.
    Yes yuck, it was the first thing that came up.

    Quote Originally Posted by MystyrMystyry View Post
    Interesting that that study was commissioned by gasp Birdseye who at last glimpse were the originators of the snapfrozen procedure. Must be scared of falling marketshare - any publicity etc, probably a paid advertorial thingy...

    It's a crock!
    Look, I'm not making this up. Why would veg that is 2/3 weeks old have more nutrientional value than somehthing which has been quickly frozen within two hours, thereby retaining freshness? Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall, Jamie Oliver and stacks of other people have said the same thing, I've read this over and over again. What part of this can't you understand? Not all veg loses its value so quickly true, root veg is quite good at retaining value in particular, but certain veg does. Fact.

  15. #30
    TobeFrank Paulclem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MystyrMystyry View Post

    Frankenstein meat is a horror - I think I'll wait until they adopt Douglas Adams idea of breeding an animal who sincerely wants to be eaten.


    [Edit: sorry, my sympathies for your pea crop Neely]
    Saves a lot of trouble. I bet the cheaper meat will be replaced by this pseudo-meat. In the future it will feature on the snobbery thread as richer purists will disdain tank meat whilst poorer people will think it's ok. I'd give it 10 years to get established.

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