Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: How is Macbeth a tragic hero?

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2

    Post How is Macbeth a tragic hero?

    Hi
    I know that macbeth is a ragic hero. But how does he show it, I would go and watch the play but its pointless since the essay am doing is not completely focused on it.
    thanks

  2. #2
    Word Dispenser BookBeauty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Norway.
    Posts
    719
    You could always find a summary on the web, if you're not willing to read or watch the play. But, that's just laziness in my opinion. Immerse yourself, learn and enjoy the self-improvement.
    There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written or badly written. ~Oscar Wilde.

  3. #3
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    The USA... or thereabouts
    Posts
    5,815
    Blog Entries
    78
    If it is pointless for you to waste your oh so precious time watching a video of the play... or worse yet, actually reading the play... as you obviously have far more important things to do such as play Angry Birds, browse through Facebook for the latest juicy gossip, and download YouTube videos of Lady Gaga, what makes you think that the people here who actually find reading to be something more than "pointless" will not find it pointless to do your homework for you?
    Beware of the man with just one book. -Ovid
    The man who doesn't read good books has no advantage over the man who can't read them.- Mark Twain
    My Blog: Of Delicious Recoil
    Link URL:
    Only the registered members can see the Link URLs. Please Login OR Register.


  4. #4
    Registered User Delta40's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Condescending Wonka
    Posts
    9,626
    Blog Entries
    61
    Ok I've just spent my Easter Sunday reading Macbeth. At first I would ask myself the same question because it is easy to say 'what a treacherous bastard!' but then one considers with what reverence he was held and the other characters involved that influenced Macbeth. Lady Macbeth, the witches, perhaps even Banquo. His own knowledge of his treachery and his self-recrimination for such a foul deed are compelling and one can even pity him, even when the ghostly hauntings of his betrayed friend appear before him. His tragedy is furthered by having no choice but to secure his ill-gotten position as king by committing other deeds unbecoming of the hero that he was until ultimately, he pays the price for all that he has done.

    That is my understanding of why Macbeth is a tragic hero.

    Does anyone care to comment? I've finally submitted to Shakespeare and agreed to read his works and want to make sure I'm on the right track so I dug this old thread up and would appreciate any feedback.
    The Rotten Apple Injures its Neighbour

  5. #5
    In the fog Charles Darnay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    trapped in a prologue.
    Posts
    2,383
    Blog Entries
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Delta40 View Post
    Ok I've just spent my Easter Sunday reading Macbeth. At first I would ask myself the same question because it is easy to say 'what a treacherous bastard!' but then one considers with what reverence he was held and the other characters involved that influenced Macbeth. Lady Macbeth, the witches, perhaps even Banquo. His own knowledge of his treachery and his self-recrimination for such a foul deed are compelling and one can even pity him, even when the ghostly hauntings of his betrayed friend appear before him. His tragedy is furthered by having no choice but to secure his ill-gotten position as king by committing other deeds unbecoming of the hero that he was until ultimately, he pays the price for all that he has done.

    That is my understanding of why Macbeth is a tragic hero.

    Does anyone care to comment? I've finally submitted to Shakespeare and agreed to read his works and want to make sure I'm on the right track so I dug this old thread up and would appreciate any feedback.
    I agree with your analysis. When people refer to him as a "tragic hero," a term I try to avoid, it is due to the lack of control he seems to have over his own actions. Like the tragic figures of ancient Greek drama, Macbeth is a noble figure brought down by greater forces.

    However. This is not my personal view of Macbeth. I do not see him as a tragic hero. Shakespeare wrote this play during the reign of King James I, a man who claimed banquo as his ancestors, hence the witchws' prophecy to him. Why would Shakespeare glorify the man who murdered the king's ancestor? As a literary figure Macbeth is closer to Richard III or Brutus: we sympathize and even like them untill they achieve their goals partway through the play (act 2 for Macbeth). Then these characters no longer needing our love turn away from us, and we watch them fall from a distance. Look at the scene where Macbeth dies: the focus is turned o Young Seyward and then macbeth's head is brought in. This is not a hero's death.

    For my more complete analysis of the play, see http://drowningmybooks.wordpress.com...02/19/macbeth/
    Last edited by Charles Darnay; 04-08-2012 at 10:21 AM.
    I wrote a poem on a leaf and it blew away...

  6. #6
    the beloved: Gladys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,499
    Quote Originally Posted by Delta40 View Post
    His tragedy is furthered by having no choice but to secure his ill-gotten position as king by committing other deeds unbecoming of the hero that he was until ultimately, he pays the price for all that he has done.
    Macbeth begins as hero and, no matter how low he sinks, there is always a remnant of heroism is his bearing and manner. This remnant is a nagging reminder of the tragic outcomes of succumbing to grave temptation.

    It is said of the Macbeths that their marriage had been happier than any in Shakespeare. And while Macbeth's behaviour is way more vile than King Lear's or Othello's, his end is equally tragic: all three are great men sadly flawed.
    "Love does not alter the beloved, it alters itself"

Similar Threads

  1. what makes Macbeth a Tragic Hero?
    By AbbasM in forum Macbeth
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-10-2011, 11:13 PM
  2. Macbeth Essay Act 1 Scene 7
    By Little_Miss_:) in forum Macbeth
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-16-2010, 01:49 PM
  3. [mark please] Macbeth Essay
    By RishadNoori in forum Macbeth
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 04-05-2009, 09:27 PM
  4. April '05 Book: Brave New World
    By Scheherazade in forum Forum Book Club
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 04-03-2009, 11:05 PM
  5. 3 ways Macbeth is a Tragic Hero?
    By MolotovMan1263 in forum Macbeth
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-31-2008, 04:17 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •