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Thread: GREAT GREAT GREAT BOOK EVA

  1. #1
    JEN
    Guest

    I LOVE DARCY

    I LOVED THIS BOOK AND I LOVE ALL THE CHARACTERS

  2. #2
    sheila
    Guest

    No Subject

    Did you just copy and paste a frickin' essay on P and P? lol If not i think you should move on and discover the other numerous classics out there, who knows you may find one which give Austen a run for her money.....then again the word's 'Mission Impossible' come to mind. = )

  3. #3
    Neil
    Guest

    Woah

    Dear god, how can you write so much on such a bad, bad book. wow.

  4. #4
    Bob
    Guest

    pride and prejudice

    What a load of crap. i REALLY hope there are not people out there who actually enjoy reading pride and prejudice. Because that is sad. I found more intelligent social comment in the Daily Star. For gods sake, this book makes me want to stab my self repeatedly with something rusty. It makes me wanna scratch out my eyes. Jesus christ. Reading it gives me the slow numbing sensation of bleeding to death.

  5. #5
    Sikandar
    Guest

    No Subject

    Women seem to love Darcy. Yet what they dont realise is that there are many men like Darcy in the world but yet no one recognises them as truly good looking ( personality wise or looks). Why is Darcy not appreciated in the "real world".

  6. #6
    *ali*
    Guest

    GREAT GREAT GREAT BOOK EVA

    THIS IS A BRILL BOOK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!<br> Jane Austen uses satire in many characters such as Lady Catherine de Bourgh and Mr Collins to show a use of ridicule or irony about the social content of that time. Pride and Prejudice deals with various qualities of social satire and irony. The opening line of the book is an unforgettable satirical thrust; it gives you an insight into the social and marriage issues of Jane Austen’s time,<br> “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife”. The irony in this reference suggests that Jane Austen isn’t in agreement with this statement, which appeared to be the standard of her time. <br> Lady Catherine de Bourgh is a very satirical character, she is satirised for her riches and in particular, her social position. She is extremely egoistic and wealthy and likes to let others know of their inferiority to her. Lady Catherine is presented as a female version of Mr Collins, but without his obsequiousness. She loves to her flattery from others and hates to be contradicted; she always gives her own opinion and doesn’t expect to be contradicted. Lady Catherine de Bourgh epitomises class snobbery especially in her attempts to order the middle class Elizabeth away from her well-bred nephew, Darcy. She is Proud and does not let the other characters forget their inferior rank. Lady Catherine de Bourgh and Elizabeth Bennet’s conversations are very comical, their conversations illustrate Elizabeth’s strength in standing up to Lady Catherine, compared with Collins imitative behaviour. Lady Catherine de Bourgh is constantly surrounded by flattery, especially received from Mr Collins; he excessively praises her. Lady Catherine has a habit of speaking her mind and is often displays a manner of incivility, lack of respect and rudeness. I think that Jane Austen uses Lady Catherine as an example that high rank doesn’t really mean that you will be well mannered and courteous. I think that Jane Austen is trying to bring across the point that people of high rank have no right to judge or look down on people of a lower rank. Many of Jane Austen’s comments on the character and her views about society are made through gentle mocking irony. Lady Catherine is a display of Jane Austen’s irony in her writing; she displays Lady Catherine as a stupid and ridiculous who thinks to highly of herself. I think that Jane Austen is using Lady Catherine to symbolise the conduct and behaviour of wealthy aristocrats of her era.<br> The Bingley Sisters are another good example of the social satire in pride and prejudice; Jane Austen shows this through their pride and arrogance. Both Bingley sisters are enormously snobbish and stuck-up. Caroline Bingley in particular scorns the Bennet family for their extreme lack of sophistication because they had relations in trade; Caroline Bingley bears inordinate disdain for Elizabeth’s middle class family for this reason. We soon learn that the Bingley Sisters “Were of a respectable family in the north of England; a circumstance more deeply impressed in their memories than that their brother's fortune and their own had been acquired by trade” This is a direct example of irony and satire because although the Bingley sisters criticise The Bennet’s, trade is actually the source that created the Bingley’s wealth; as their ancestors were in trade. The satire shows the snobby nature of the Bingley sisters and that they criticise others for the things that they too share. The Bingley sisters are very aware of what society expects of them and act in an improper and offensive way towards people of a lower rank. Caroline Bingley is superficial and selfish; she has all of Darcy’s class prejudice, but none of his respect and virtue. She pretends to be a friend of Jane’s but is extremely bad mannered towards her when she goes to visit in London. Throughout the novel she is constantly trying to win Darcy’s affections, she tries to prevent Darcy’s attachment towards Elizabeth by constantly ridiculing the poor manners of Mrs Bennet and her personality. They are both very snobbish, but are shown to be not as high as they think to be. This is another example of the irony in Jane Austen’s writing, The Bingley sisters are being gently mocked because of their attitude towards the Bennet’s because; their ancestors are in trade, when the Bingley’s ancestors were too in trade.<br> Mr Collins is too a satirised character, because he displays such a flattery for Lady Catherine de Bourgh, he praises her excessively. I think that Jane Austen shows Collins as a very comical character because has shows a personality mix of obsequiousness and pride. Mr Collins is a pompous and a generally idiotic clergyman who stands to inherit Mr Bennet’s property. Mr Collins own social status is nothing to boast about, but he takes great pains to let everyone know that Lady Catherine de Bough is his patroness. Mr Collins is very much aware of social class and status, and is seen as social climber, he is a classically represents what Jane Austen hated about the clergymen of her time.<br>Jane Austen makes Collins look very ridiculous seeing as he is a clergyman, but meanwhile is a very materialistic man. He tries to come across as a humble man, when in actual fact he has a very materialistic outlook to life, he values only the quantity or size of a house. This make him looks incredibly stupid, because he is meant to be a man of the church, but is unbelievably lacking in Christian spirit. Collins is a great example of how Jane Austen uses her character to portray satire, because he is a man who is constantly aware of society and what people think of him, this is what makes him proud. Meanwhile he also tries to put on a front that he is a humble man, who cares for people. Society has made Collins into a man who constantly feels the need to please everyone around him; this makes him a completely false character. Jane Austen uses Collins as a satirical tool to show a form of ridicule and sarcasm, he is a great object of the social satire of that time. Mr Collins is a mixture of obsequiousness and arrogance, self-importance and modesty, makes him appear as a fool. I think that Jane Austen uses Mr Collins in particular to satirise the image of the clergy during her period, especially in his lack of Christian spirit revealed in the letter sent to Mr Bennet about the news of Lydia’s fall. Jane Austen uses Collins as a satirical tool to expose what many people of the clergy were like during that period.<br> Wickham is another good example of how Jane Austen uses her characters to bring out the satire of that time. Wickham is initially shown to be a good amicable man; he had the appearance of goodness and virtue. He is stylish and handsome and therefore is extremely attractive to the young ladies of Meryton, he displays “all the best part of beauty, a fine countenance, a good figure, and very pleasing address” His true nature begins to show itself later in the novel, due to several revelations about his past. I think that Jane Austen uses Wickham’s character to warn that good looks and politeness may hide what is very unpleasant about someone’s character. She shows Wickham as an example that some people may not appear what they really seem to be. <br> Mrs Bennet is too a very much satirised character by Jane Austen throughout the novel for her shallowness. Society has put a burden on Mrs Bennet’s shoulders that she must marry off her five daughters whatever the cost. She is a foolish, frivolous woman. Mrs Bennet isn’t very intelligent the issue of marrying off her daughters at any cost permanently distracts her. She lacks all sense of virtue and has no real concern for the moral or intellectual education of her five daughters. Mrs Bennet is in a society, which demands that very decent woman should be married, which has made Mrs Bennet into what she is. From the beginning of the novel, we can see that Mrs Bennet’s sole obsession is to marry off her daughters. She is more concerned with marrying daughters preferably into money rather than happiness. Jane Austen is using Mrs Bennet to show what society had turned many mothers into.<br> Overall I think that Jane Austen has used many of her characters as satirical tools, to criticise the society of her time. She used it to show what she didn’t like about the society. Jane Austen does use characters like Elizabeth Bennet in a positive way to expose the satire used in many of Jane Austen’s characters. I think that Elizabeth Bennet is like a reflection of Jane Austen; she uses Elizabeth’s character to express her ironic views about the society of that time. I think that Jane Austen was very much like the character Elizabeth in her time; this can be seen in what Elizabeth says, <br>"I hope I never ridicule what is wise or good. Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can." There is a lot of witty play of language in many of Elizabeth’s conversations, especially between characters like Lady Catherine de Bourgh and Darcy.<br>Many of Jane Austen’s comments of the characters and her views about society are made through gentle mocking irony throughout the novel. Jane Austen's sense of humour and intelligence allowed her to show the reader the, "follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies," of her characters. The way she writes about characters such as Lady Catherine de Bourgh, Collins, the Bingley Sisters and Mrs Bennett are good examples of this. She also does so without being unreasonable, as she laughs not at them, but at what they do.<br>

  7. #7

    Pride and Prejudice

    I'm sorry, it is above any of you to label a book rubbish. The point is while that may be your opinion, the far majority of the world thinks otherwise and, yes, it is great. We may find things wrong with it, yes, but that is merely our own opinion. The far majority of people love it, so those who cry their eyes out when they see somebody loving it, grow up, because the world is not all about you and what you think; stop being so petty and childish.

  8. #8
    Registered User Aunty-lion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brendan Madley View Post
    I'm sorry, it is above any of you to label a book rubbish. The point is while that may be your opinion, the far majority of the world thinks otherwise and, yes, it is great. We may find things wrong with it, yes, but that is merely our own opinion. The far majority of people love it, so those who cry their eyes out when they see somebody loving it, grow up, because the world is not all about you and what you think; stop being so petty and childish.
    I totally agree, thankyou Brendan. This thread was really getting on my nerves until I read this post.

    Sure, I think it's a great book, and other people don't, but why are you bothering to post if you aren't going to say something that might be of worth to someone else?? "It's good" "it sucks" "its good" etc is not a very remarkable argument.
    Women and men(both dong and ding)
    summer autumn winter spring
    reaped their sowing and went their came
    sun moon stars rain

  9. #9
    [QUOTE=Aunty-lion;372681]I totally agree, thankyou Brendan. This thread was really getting on my nerves until I read this post.

    Sure, I think it's a great book, and other people don't, but why are you bothering to post if you aren't going to say something that might be of worth to someone else?? "It's ooooooooogood" "it sucks" "its good" etc is not a very remarkable argument.[/QUo OTE]

    I am merely telling such people who see enjoying Pride and Prejudice or such books horrific and worthy of treason etc. that it is childish for them to display such horror and put others down to such a degree when it is merely their opinion. I'm standing up for those who like it, and those with any real sense of decency or reason.

  10. #10
    Registered User Aunty-lion's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Brendan Madley;373140]
    Quote Originally Posted by Aunty-lion View Post
    I totally agree, thankyou Brendan. This thread was really getting on my nerves until I read this post.

    Sure, I think it's a great book, and other people don't, but why are you bothering to post if you aren't going to say something that might be of worth to someone else?? "It's ooooooooogood" "it sucks" "its good" etc is not a very remarkable argument.[/QUo OTE]

    I am merely telling such people who see enjoying Pride and Prejudice or such books horrific and worthy of treason etc. that it is childish for them to display such horror and put others down to such a degree when it is merely their opinion. I'm standing up for those who like it, and those with any real sense of decency or reason.

    I hope you realise Brendan that the second part of my post was not aimed at you, but rather at the people who had posted before you. Sorry if I was unclear. I totally agree with you
    Women and men(both dong and ding)
    summer autumn winter spring
    reaped their sowing and went their came
    sun moon stars rain

  11. #11
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    I enjoy the varied satirical characters, but the writing style is slightly too foppish for my tastes.

    Most of my students always seem to like it, though.
    Currently Reading:

    Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky

    Invisible Man - Ralph Ellison

    "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" - Edward Albee

  12. #12
    the beloved: Gladys's Avatar
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    But isn't it so funny towards the end?

  13. #13
    Registered User black butterffl's Avatar
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    well the thing is i still didn't read the book, however i'm going to , anyway what i wanted to ask is, why do u guys hate it so much?? several people told me that it's a great book and i should read it... so why many of you hate this book???

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