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Thread: Is poetry a dead realm?

  1. #1
    Haribol Acharya blazeofglory's Avatar
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    Is poetry a dead realm?

    If not why few persons read it and the fact that some people speaking in defense of poesy has to roam fruitlessly for the epoch of poetry is over and we are descending upon a new eon poems can no longer be epochal and poets no more epoch makers.

    Today we live in an age of the Net and we are wired emotionally and what goes on inside you gets transmitted to me gets wired to me invisibly and inconspicuously. You have no fire for poems, if you speak sincerely.

    The day is gone, the altitude of it has liquefied and the colossal monuments our composers, defenders or sponsors of poetry has broken down into the pieces of something which cannot be rewoven into any valuables that can reawaken human feelings and passions.

    “Those who seek to satisfy the mind of man by hampering it with ceremonies and music and affecting charity and devotion have lost their original nature””

    “If water derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind! The mind of the sage, being in repose, becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation.

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    Registered User Delta40's Avatar
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    Are you suggesting that the pursuit of new means of artistic expression have gone by the wayside or are you lamenting the passing of a craft which is destined to evolve?
    Before sunlight can shine through a window, the blinds must be raised - American Proverb

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    riding a cosmic vortex MystyrMystyry's Avatar
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    First time I've encountered a troll thread...

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    Haribol Acharya blazeofglory's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MystyrMystyry View Post
    First time I've encountered a troll thread...
    Why this prejudice? That lowers you lower than the lowest. Sense the spirit of it or else you cannot qualify for commeents, my dear.

    “Those who seek to satisfy the mind of man by hampering it with ceremonies and music and affecting charity and devotion have lost their original nature””

    “If water derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind! The mind of the sage, being in repose, becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation.

  5. #5
    I disagree compleatly.
    As an aspiring poet I think that being in the "age of the net" has given me more encouragement to write and put my works out there. That ability to keep your identity a secret while sharing the deep parts of your emotions and souls.
    But this, I suppose is a matter of perception, but so is poetry being dead.

  6. #6
    Haribol Acharya blazeofglory's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by poetindisguise View Post
    I disagree compleatly.
    As an aspiring poet I think that being in the "age of the net" has given me more encouragement to write and put my works out there. That ability to keep your identity a secret while sharing the deep parts of your emotions and souls.
    But this, I suppose is a matter of perception, but so is poetry being dead.

    A few loners like you cornering oneself and musing. The rest are in their in rat races in pursuit of something different. In those days, at least 3 decades ago quite a large mass of people relished poetry. I myself had never got a day unspent without poetry. But for the last 15 years not a single day was devoted to versification. Just a few people in isolation engaging in the pursuit of a poetic venture does not mean that poetry is alive in the same degree and intensity as it did a long time ago.

    It is dying out though the heart beat is still there.

    “Those who seek to satisfy the mind of man by hampering it with ceremonies and music and affecting charity and devotion have lost their original nature””

    “If water derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind! The mind of the sage, being in repose, becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation.

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    Maybe YesNo's Avatar
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    I recently read John Gardner's Grendal. The reason I bring this up in this thread is because it talked about language and specifically poetry. (Of course, I might have totally misunderstood it.)

    Anyway, Grendal is captivated by the new poet that sings for Hrothgar. This poet uses language so well everyone is elated except for Grendal and the previous poet who leaves feeling that he was a failure compared to the new guy. The point to take from this: there is power in language when it is used well, but not everyone uses it well.

    Later, when Beowulf tears off Grendal's arm he uses language as his chief weapon. In a sense Grendal was killed by Beowulf's chatting. Now it is not that other people haven't tried to talk Grendal to death, but unlike those other people Beowulf succeeded. No doubt, ripping off the arm helped, but Beowulf's language positioned him to do that.

    How does this relate to poetry? Poetry is language that should be as powerful as Beowulf's words. Often it isn't. Language as powerful as Beowulf's is still being used, but rarely today in the context of what traditionally is seen as poetry. If you ever get bored when you read a poem, if the poem looks like a senseless literary sudoku puzzle, if the poem is dripping with self-righteousness, pity and egotism when it is understandable, it is basically a poem written by that poet in Hrothgar's court who was replaced when the real poet arrived.

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    Haribol Acharya blazeofglory's Avatar
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    Reading this thread some budding poets or posters may surmise that I have no passion for poetry. I am simply lamenting at the death of poetry. I personally want to revive it into its original beauty.

    I know with the death of this beautiful art our lives have been dryer and more numb. People are living robotic-ally and dryly, passionlessly. Man has been a heap of bones and his voices the rattles of them.

    We cannot be happy at the innocence of children, at the mystery of the universe and at the beauty of nature.

    Now we have a computer or a TV set and a few dry newspapers and the clinking cell phone.

    The whole community I turn around is messy. People have no time but too much of it to purse something meaningless but not for some creative persuasion.

    Tell me now is poetry still living?

    “Those who seek to satisfy the mind of man by hampering it with ceremonies and music and affecting charity and devotion have lost their original nature””

    “If water derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind! The mind of the sage, being in repose, becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation.

  9. #9
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    Philip Sydney published The Defense Of Poesy in 1595

    Percy Bysshe Shelley also published a Defense in 1821

    Methinks you overestimate the importance and uniqueness of our times

  10. #10
    Haribol Acharya blazeofglory's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YesNo View Post
    I recently read John Gardner's Grendal. The reason I bring this up in this thread is because it talked about language and specifically poetry. (Of course, I might have totally misunderstood it.)

    Anyway, Grendal is captivated by the new poet that sings for Hrothgar. This poet uses language so well everyone is elated except for Grendal and the previous poet who leaves feeling that he was a failure compared to the new guy. The point to take from this: there is power in language when it is used well, but not everyone uses it well.

    Later, when Beowulf tears off Grendal's arm he uses language as his chief weapon. In a sense Grendal was killed by Beowulf's chatting. Now it is not that other people haven't tried to talk Grendal to death, but unlike those other people Beowulf succeeded. No doubt, ripping off the arm helped, but Beowulf's language positioned him to do that.

    How does this relate to poetry? Poetry is language that should be as powerful as Beowulf's words. Often it isn't. Language as powerful as Beowulf's is still being used, but rarely today in the context of what traditionally is seen as poetry. If you ever get bored when you read a poem, if the poem looks like a senseless literary sudoku puzzle, if the poem is dripping with self-righteousness, pity and egotism when it is understandable, it is basically a poem written by that poet in Hrothgar's court who was replaced when the real poet arrived.
    This heralds a new dawn of poetry. Of course language is powerful. I am sure if a poet can use the beauty of language, in fact language is a beauty, I will withdraw this thread that claimed poetry is dead.

    Maybe this gives an indication that today poetry could not flow with the stream of language. Or our language could not advance to contain the beauty of poetry. AM I RIGHT?

    “Those who seek to satisfy the mind of man by hampering it with ceremonies and music and affecting charity and devotion have lost their original nature””

    “If water derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind! The mind of the sage, being in repose, becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation.

  11. #11
    Haribol Acharya blazeofglory's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alexander III View Post
    Philip Sydney published The Defense Of Poesy in 1595

    Percy Bysshe Shelley also published a Defense in 1821

    Methinks you overestimate the importance and uniqueness of our times
    Maybe I will write something in defense of poetry. Poetry is indeed a curative, an antidote to this sick world.

    Alas! it has lost its earlier sheen.

    But as the previous poster has marvelously said poetry can be revived by means of the beauty of language and I will be proved wrong then.

    “Those who seek to satisfy the mind of man by hampering it with ceremonies and music and affecting charity and devotion have lost their original nature””

    “If water derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind! The mind of the sage, being in repose, becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation.

  12. #12
    Poetry will never die. Not as long as at least one person still holds passion for the verse. I know that it is dying and dying fast but as long as I still have passion, and other loners such as myself continue to write it can never die. And even if no one is left who writes, if the words of past poets are still here then poetry is still alive.

  13. #13
    Haribol Acharya blazeofglory's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by poetindisguise View Post
    Poetry will never die. Not as long as at least one person still holds passion for the verse. I know that it is dying and dying fast but as long as I still have passion, and other loners such as myself continue to write it can never die. And even if no one is left who writes, if the words of past poets are still here then poetry is still alive.

    Your reciting of poetry will not resound with the rest or your tone cannot be reverberated and the fire you have kindled will go dimmer and dimmer since the fuel is draining.

    With that said do not desperate. Just a few loners musing it cannot make poetry alive and all you must do is to reinvent.

    “Those who seek to satisfy the mind of man by hampering it with ceremonies and music and affecting charity and devotion have lost their original nature””

    “If water derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind! The mind of the sage, being in repose, becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation.

  14. #14
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
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    Is poetry a dead realm?
    If not why (do) few persons read it...(?)


    Since when does one measure artistic worth or relevance by numbers? How many readers did Virgil have? Were his poems commonly read across the globe? In India, Persia, China, Japan, Africa, South America, North America? In all reality, poetry and the more well-known poets are read today by a larger audience than they ever had at any time in history. Contemporary poets like Anne Carson, Geoffrey Hill, Charles Simic, W.C. Merwin, and Seamus Heaney sell more books and are available through publication in magazines, newspapers, and the internet to a larger audience than William Blake, Keats, John Donne, Shakespeare, or Dante ever had during their lifetime.

    Poetry admittedly remains an area of minority interest in comparison to prose and the whole of the writing... but again, of what relevance is this? Opera has but a limited audience... as does classical music as a whole, the ballet, the theater, painting, sculpture, etc... Are we to assume that only that which speaks to the masses is of any worth? Honestly, even the huge entertainment conglomerates of American professional sports and Hollywood films reach but a limited audience when one considers the population of the world as a whole.

    The day is gone...

    Again... what day exactly do you refer to? When and where was poetry a voice of the majority or the masses?

    In those days, at least 3 decades ago quite a large mass of people relished poetry.

    Three decades ago? The 1980s... the 1970s... the 1960s...? These were a time when poetry filled the lives of the masses? Really?

    Reading this thread some budding poets or posters may surmise that I have no passion for poetry. I am simply lamenting at the death of poetry.

    And yet the facts contradict you. More people than ever write and read poetry. More books and magazines on poetry are published than ever. The leading poets of today reach audiences that dwarf that of a majority of the greatest poets of the past. You notions of the past are based upon an illusion.

    Shakespeare may have been the towering figure of his time... but he did not live during the "age of Shakespeare"... an illusory era when the masses recognized the voice of poetic genius and when the man on the street was reciting the words of the bard. He lived in a time when he was a successful playwright... but still competed against vulgar exhibitions of bear-baiting and was unknown by most of his fellow countrymen... to say nothing of the whole of Europe and the world.

    Where and when was this "golden age" of poetry and the arts that you imagine existed in the past?
    Last edited by stlukesguild; 04-13-2011 at 09:03 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by blazeofglory View Post
    If not why few persons read it and the fact that some people speaking in defense of poesy has to roam fruitlessly for the epoch of poetry is over and we are descending upon a new eon poems can no longer be epochal and poets no more epoch makers.

    Today we live in an age of the Net and we are wired emotionally and what goes on inside you gets transmitted to me gets wired to me invisibly and inconspicuously. You have no fire for poems, if you speak sincerely.

    The day is gone, the altitude of it has liquefied and the colossal monuments our composers, defenders or sponsors of poetry has broken down into the pieces of something which cannot be rewoven into any valuables that can reawaken human feelings and passions.
    Picking this apart piece by piece:

    Your first paragraph underscores the vast audience of poetry. I read and write poetry daily. So do countless others in my neighboring schools and city. Internet makes poetry much more accessible, video links record live performances, and poetry performances are more frequent, especially at our school where we host regional exhibitions. Poetry has perhaps never had a larger audience. Man's life and his society have evolved; only because there are more amenities and mediums for entertainment does not suggest that poetry is less relished or less read. It is just less prominent in a more-diversified world. But less-prominent does not mean less-read.

    Paragraph two simply overestimates the influences of the web on our life. Man manipulating technology does not suggest Man is manipulated by it.

    Paragraph three is utterly predjudiced, as is the other post I quote. Why ask about the state of poetry if you've already determined it has ended? The world today has a far greater literacy rate than ever before, and yet will still be lower than future rates will hold. More people read poetry today than ever before. Just because our current era lacks a prominent poetic giant (a statement either JBI or StLukes will contest) that contends with a Whitman, Byron, Blake or Shakespeare (something probably a true statement) does not insist that our poetry is diminished. Becoming a prominent poet today is perhaps harder than ever before. There are more and more precedents and illustrious figures who have defined the many genres. To escape their influence and create something innovative is far more difficult today than before, when less giants defined less genres.

    Quote Originally Posted by blazeofglory View Post
    A few loners like you cornering oneself and musing. The rest are in their in rat races in pursuit of something different. In those days, at least 3 decades ago quite a large mass of people relished poetry. I myself had never got a day unspent without poetry. But for the last 15 years not a single day was devoted to versification. Just a few people in isolation engaging in the pursuit of a poetic venture does not mean that poetry is alive in the same degree and intensity as it did a long time ago.
    It is dying out though the heart beat is still there.
    I'd argue that literature has no golden era. In the times of Dickens, literacy rates were in the teens, maybe. Few people could read; fewer probably committed to poetry. The fact is, the population is growing larger instantaneously. The amount of people able to read is growing too. Only because versification and memorization are less prominent does not suggest poetry has declined. Man's life and modes of entertainment have expanded, and poetry must compete with more options. This does not degrade poetry, just suggests it isn't as central to life.

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