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Thread: Faulkner Does It

  1. #16
    Registered User Jassy Melson's Avatar
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    Underrated by whom? you ask. Underrated by some I answered.
    I am going to stop getting involved in any discussion on this site. There are people who are just waiting to leap on something you say for the hades of it. I'm sick and tired of it. This is my last word on any extended discussion.
    Dostoevsky gives me more than any scientist.

    Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world. - Albert Einstein

  2. #17
    Vincit Qui Se Vincit Virgil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jassy Melson View Post
    Underrated by whom? you ask. Underrated by some I answered.
    I am going to stop getting involved in any discussion on this site. There are people who are just waiting to leap on something you say for the hades of it. I'm sick and tired of it. This is my last word on any extended discussion.
    I'm sorry Jassy. I wasn't jumping on you personally. I was asking a question.
    LET THERE BE LIGHT

    "Love follows knowledge." St. Catherine of Siena

    My literature blog: http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/

  3. #18
    Pro Libertate L.M. The Third's Avatar
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    (Sorry that it's been forever and a day since I've had time to come on Litnet and reply here.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack of Hearts View Post
    It seems you are saying that the value of the 'verities of the human heart' is to be felt in their overwhelming absence (the implied abscence from the quote above as well as the direct mentioning in Faulkner's speech). It seems you have a pessimistic view with a trend toward finding 'the silver lining.'
    Actually, the pessimism isn't inherent in me, but in my trying to reconcile a book that I found painful (but endlessly fascinating and artistic) with a personal belief that someday good must come of ill... far off, at last...


    It's been two years since this reader has visited the conclusion of The Sound and the Fury (though the middle chapter he revisits at intervals). In forgetting the actual events, he seems to remember finding it rather unhopeful, much as in As I Lay Dying. The reader attributes any such plea as something perhaps carried with you while you were reading it- not to say this is bad form. Literature and philosophy are intermingled like that, and it takes two to tango... whether Faulkner is giving the readers his or you're giving him yours.

    The only conclusion worth reading out of this response to you (one which you undoubtedly already knew) is the following: the way a person interprets literature is revealing of the values and perspectives that person holds. Our understanding is a reflection of ourselves and (normative statement warning) infinitely valuable to reflect upon.

    Perhaps one of the greater elements of Faulkner's work is it feeds no morality in any objective effort. It's up to a reader to fill that gap, and (blatant personal 'tell' warning) could there be anything more reflective of life itself?




    J
    I think that you're probably largely right here. My problem in seeing the book as a mirror is that it renders it amoral. As a mirror to the thoughts and intents of the heart, it can be used by a wise person to probe themselves, which might lead to change, but the book is not inherently uplifting. It doesn't have any power, apart from a faithful account of humanity, which only a few will be wise enough to rightly understand and apply to themselves and which even fewer will be changed by. It's still amoral, and I don't know if that fits into Faulkner's description or not. Perhaps I too much underestimate the power of a mirror. And, perhaps too, I'm placing too much bearing upon the sentiments expressed in the speech and should simply take the novel for its glory of narrative and art.

    Virgil, I read the thread you linked to and particularly appreciated some of your comments. Thanks.

  4. #19
    Registered User Jassy Melson's Avatar
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    I just have a comment to make about the form of Faulkner's TSatF. It was revolutionary for its time. It may be difficult for us to grasp the sensation that the novel caused when it was published in 1929. Nothing like it, in terms of form, had ever been seen before. In terms of form, it was a truly revolutionary novel,
    Dostoevsky gives me more than any scientist.

    Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world. - Albert Einstein

  5. #20
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    The original poster's intent was to curve this toward creating stories- so he thanks you all (especially L.M. III) and contentedly moves to start considering the human heart in conflict with itself for his own writing.




    J

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