Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 18

Thread: Who have read Arthur Rimbaud`s poems ?

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2

    Who have read Arthur Rimbaud`s poems ?

    WHO have read the poems ,please just say sth about your feelings of that,for communication,haha!!!

  2. #2
    Registered User Jassy Melson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,772
    Blog Entries
    1
    I read Rimbaud's two collections of poetry--Illuminations and A Season in Hell--about 35 years ago. My reaction to Rimbaud was one of utter amazement. How could a 19-year-old write like that? What a genius! He was amazing, and his life was amazing too.
    Dostoevsky gives me more than any scientist.

    Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world. - Albert Einstein

  3. #3
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    The USA... or thereabouts
    Posts
    6,076
    Blog Entries
    78
    I've read Rimbaud quite a few times. His Illuminations is among my favorite books of poetry. Your suggestion that we discuss Rimbaud's poetry, however, is a bit vague and considering that you have only 2 posts to your name and we wouldn't want to think that you are just fishing for someone to do your homework for you, what exactly are you looking to discuss in Rimbaud and what poems or what aspects of his poetry strikes you?
    Beware of the man with just one book. -Ovid
    The man who doesn't read good books has no advantage over the man who can't read them.- Mark Twain
    My Blog: Of Delicious Recoil
    http://stlukesguild.tumblr.com/

  4. #4
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    University or my little estate
    Posts
    2,386
    Quote Originally Posted by Jassy Melson View Post
    I read Rimbaud's two collections of poetry--Illuminations and A Season in Hell--about 35 years ago. My reaction to Rimbaud was one of utter amazement. How could a 19-year-old write like that? What a genius! He was amazing, and his life was amazing too.
    What he said.

    (except I have read all of his poetry, and read it very often, the writer I turn to most actually, him and Shelley)

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    32
    He was a genius indeed! His poem "Ver Erat" that he wrote when he was about 12y.o proves that he was extremely talented! (In Latin of course), His consciousness of his greatness (12 y.o. man!!!) are expressed here:

    "Meanwhile the doves returned; in their beaks they bore
    A crown, a laurel garland: crowned thus, Apollo
    Delights to strike with his finger and sounding strings.
    And when they had bound my brows with the laurel crown,
    Lo, the heavens opened before me and suddenly
    To my astonished eyed, hovering in the golden cloud
    Phoebus! Hid divine hand offered me the sounding lyre,
    And with fire from heaven he traced these words on my brow:
    YOU WILL BE A POET...."

  6. #6

    Lightbulb

    I read some of Rimbaud's poem. Some of them are figurative that make use of nature.

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    32
    brilliant!

  8. #8
    Registered User laymonite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    152
    I can't think of an enfant terrible with more depth in any field! When I read Rimbaud, I cannot believe I'm reading poetry and prose-poems all written by age 21! I've read the Complete Works edition of the Wallace Fowlie translations, and I'm currently re-reading Rimbaud in the original.
    J'ai seul la clef de cette parade sauvage.
    - Rimbaud

  9. #9
    Freed by your indulgence deryk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    Posts
    486
    Blog Entries
    2
    I sleep with Fowlie's bilingual version. He really was standing on the fulcrum between classicism and modernism. He's one of the few poets I can read on a regular basis and actually feel myself changing from the reading. That's power!

  10. #10
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    University or my little estate
    Posts
    2,386
    Well instead of everyone just saying yea he is great! Lets get some discussion going. Here is a topic off the bat - Trough his youth to when he quits writing his poetry has dramatic changes. I would personally divide his poetic maturation in three periods.

    First there is the classical period, where he writes beautiful verse following standards of rhyme and meter. Ophelia and Sleeper in the Valley, to me are his greatest achievements in this period.

    Then he produces The Drunken Boat, using the classic conventions yet also moving towards the surrealism of his latter Illuminations.

    The Illuminations for me are his poetic peak, where he abandons poetry as legible communications and attempts to break free from the confines of ineffectual language, here he attempts to make poetry and imitation of music. No meaning, no purpose no sense, simply pure aesthetic sensation. Words are no longer chosen for their meaning but for their evocativeness, images are created for ambience to attempt to communicate and express what Rilke would later call "The Unsayable".

    After the Illuminations he composes his last poet work - A season in Hell. Yet this work is not merely and extended piece based on the same techniques he used in the Illuminations. In the illuminations every words is precise, every image perfect - Now he moves away from making poetry into music; he appears to go from music to madness. In my opinion this is his poetically weakest stage. It is speculated that a reason for this change in style may be his opium abuse. While composing the Illuminations he used hash extensively ( not to create poetry, but rather recreationally), in the period where he wrote The Season in Hell, he abused opium to a large extent, being on the verge of classification as an addict, this may have temporarily caused mental degeneration. This along with his final break with Verlaine and his loss of faith in poetry ( as he would soon abandon writing all together) may be the reasons for the madness and loss of the aesthetic greatness of his previous efforts.

    So what do you guys think on this?

  11. #11
    Freed by your indulgence deryk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    Posts
    486
    Blog Entries
    2
    Well, I think it's interesting that his stylistic transformation also accompanies his journey from child to adult in many respects. His earliest work at the age of a small child basically involved emulating deeply classicist poetry. He literally shrugged off many of those conventions or outgrew them rather, as he physically developed as a human being. I feel as though I can identify with his early-to-mid works perfectly, because despite my physical age, that's the cognitive/emotional age I still occupy. I'm drawn to my own inability to totally synthesize his later Illuminations into my personal realm of experience, because it reflects on my inability to grow up in some ways. Does that make sense?

  12. #12
    Freed by your indulgence deryk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    Posts
    486
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Alexander III View Post
    Now he moves away from making poetry into music; he appears to go from music to madness.
    Or decadence rather, which arguably, was a step back for him.

  13. #13
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    University or my little estate
    Posts
    2,386
    Quote Originally Posted by deryk View Post
    Or decadence rather, which arguably, was a step back for him.
    Yes that is what I said, his Season in Hell, appears and aesthetically weaker work compared to his Illuminations. However A Season in Hell does have glimmers of true excellence, for instance I believe this short piece from the poem is one of his finest creations:

    Elle est retrouvée.
    Quoi? - L'Éternité.
    C'est la mer allée
    Avec le soleil.

    I Suppose I would translate that into english as

    It is found.
    What? - Eternity.
    It is the sea, gone
    With the sun.

    Now while I do agree that the illuminations were his poetic peak, I should note that some of his earlier poems can stand head to head with pieces from the Illuminations. Ophelia, Le Batteau Ivre and Sensations - stand equal to any set poem from the Illuminations.

  14. #14
    Freed by your indulgence deryk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    Posts
    486
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Alexander III View Post
    Yes that is what I said, his Season in Hell, appears and aesthetically weaker work compared to his Illuminations. However A Season in Hell does have glimmers of true excellence, for instance I believe this short piece from the poem is one of his finest creations:

    Elle est retrouvée.
    Quoi? - L'Éternité.
    C'est la mer allée
    Avec le soleil.

    I Suppose I would translate that into english as

    It is found.
    What? - Eternity.
    It is the sea, gone
    With the sun.

    Now while I do agree that the illuminations were his poetic peak, I should note that some of his earlier poems can stand head to head with pieces from the Illuminations. Ophelia, Le Batteau Ivre and Sensations - stand equal to any set poem from the Illuminations.
    I got hung up on those lines a lot as well. It may not be possible to exhaust them in my mind. Sort of an elliptical and brutal epiphany, understanding that our concept of fate is a paradoxical mistake.
    Last edited by deryk; 03-10-2011 at 01:10 AM.

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    10

    Rimbaud - Boy Genius

    Elle est retrouvée.
    Quoi? - L'Éternité.
    C'est la mer allée
    Avec le soleil.


    These lines are actually from an poem written earlier than A Season in Hell. Rimbaud is in fact quoting himself.

    I realise this discussion is rather old and there may be no one taking any notice of it but I'm a great fan of Rimbaud. I've been obsessed with him for close on 40 years.

    It may also be the case that some of the Illuminations were written later than A Season in Hell - and while this is considered his farewell to poetry he cared enough about it to have it published privately - so hadn't completely given up at that time.

    I'm writing a book about a lost work of Rimbaud's and am always interested in a discussion about the Wonder Boy.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Poems where you're not really trying.
    By NikolaiI in forum Poetry Games & Contests
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 05-23-2015, 11:46 AM
  2. Harry Potter
    By jessw in forum General Literature
    Replies: 550
    Last Post: 12-03-2011, 12:12 PM
  3. Harry Potter
    By goldenbee in forum General Literature
    Replies: 320
    Last Post: 06-23-2011, 02:34 PM
  4. How many members of this Forum have read Jane Austen?
    By Celine Field in forum Austen, Jane
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 06-22-2011, 10:47 PM
  5. Comparing and Contrasting the Poems by Shakespeare and Allan Poe
    By David_42 in forum Poems, Poets, and Poetry
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-11-2010, 10:45 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •