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Thread: Poetry is not Prose, and Thus Should Not be Devoured as Such

  1. #16
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    Lets help wikipeadia to increase the number of access in their site.

  2. #17
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    Yes, I think your problem is extremely common. I think it is for nearly everyone who isn't an avid reader of poetry, and just like StLukes points out, it takes practice. Add to this that many English classes don't teach as much poetry as should be taught (a teacher at the school I student taught at only had one week of poetry for her whole year in her sophomore English class--one week--because she said she found it "boring;" outrageous). This is truly a travesty.

    As for reading poetry like prose, no, I don't think one should go about it like that (again, unless you're very well-read with poetry). Poetry is a completely different read. With prose, you can usually read it once, understand what's going on, and then move on. With a poem, I always try to read it at least five times, each time slowly, maybe a couple times out-loud, and than think about it. After five poems where I really read them, my brain is shot. Going through a whole book night after night would be grueling. To me, the only poetry to be read similarly to prose would be epic poetry.

    P.S. I had to look up who Cervantes was a couple months ago because I never heard of him, either. After public education and five years of college, not once was Cervantes even mentioned. I of course had heard of Don Quixote, but wouldn't have been able to tell you who the author was if my life depended on it.

    Also, many sections of Shakespeare's plays' dialogue are written in prose form.

  3. #18
    Registered User ScribbleScribe's Avatar
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    Hey, I learned something today (who cervantes was), I'm happy. ^_^;

  4. #19
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
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    Of corse JBI, JCamillo, and I NEVER EVER use Wikipedia.
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  5. #20
    Registered User ScribbleScribe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mutatis-Mutandi View Post

    P.S. I had to look up who Cervantes was a couple months ago because I never heard of him, either. After public education and five years of college, not once was Cervantes even mentioned. I of course had heard of Don Quixote, but wouldn't have been able to tell you who the author was if my life depended on it.
    Same so far here in college and high school he hasnt been mentioned.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScribbleScribe View Post
    Same so far here in college and high school he hasnt been mentioned.
    They may have changed his name to "Hyspanic-American" to not offende the new chicanos and make easier for people to understand.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScribbleScribe View Post
    Same so far here in college and high school he hasnt been mentioned.
    Quite amazing, him being the father of the modern novel and all.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by stlukesguild View Post
    Of corse JBI, JCamillo, and I NEVER EVER use Wikipedia.
    I use Wikileaks.

  9. #24
    Registered User kelby_lake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScribbleScribe View Post
    Personally, I just hate the idea of having read something and not giving it the wholeness and roundness it deserves. You can read the words which the author has written, but until you understand things like history, literary movements and the author's own personal history, the words remain just that, words.
    So glad that I'm not the only person who after finishing a books rushes off to do more research on it Context adds a whole new layer.

  10. #25
    Captain Azure Patrick_Bateman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stlukesguild View Post
    Of corse JBI, JCamillo, and I NEVER EVER use Wikipedia.
    I expected this to be the case to be honest

    For all its purported shortcomings, it is an extremely useful launching pad. Especially if you have absolutely no previous knowledge of a topic or author you are researching.

    It's like if you want to learn about the Russian Revolutions YOU DO NOT BEGIN WITH LEON TROTSKY'S MAMMOTH CHRONICLE. You start with something succinct and clear. (Sheila Fitzpatrick would be the wikipedia for the Russian Revolution for example.)
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  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mutatis-Mutandi View Post
    .... With a poem, I always try to read it at least five times, each time slowly, maybe a couple times out-loud, and than think about it......
    I think this is an excellent suggestion, MM - often the sound of the words is as important as the meaning. Thinking about the phrasing required to convey the sense of the line often helps to elucidate the meaning.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCamilo View Post
    They may have changed his name to "Hyspanic-American" to not offende the new chicanos and make easier for people to understand.
    No. He just hasnt been mentioned at all in any form.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mutatis-Mutandi View Post
    Quite amazing, him being the father of the modern novel and all.
    I guess if you think about it, maybe they dont focus on him because he is SPANISH. Theyre mostly teaching american lit and english lit these days, not spanish lit translated into english.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick_Bateman View Post
    I expected this to be the case to be honest

    For all its purported shortcomings, it is an extremely useful launching pad. Especially if you have absolutely no previous knowledge of a topic or author you are researching.

    It's like if you want to learn about the Russian Revolutions YOU DO NOT BEGIN WITH LEON TROTSKY'S MAMMOTH CHRONICLE. You start with something succinct and clear. (Sheila Fitzpatrick would be the wikipedia for the Russian Revolution for example.)
    There is no problem on using Wikipedia. Encyclopedias are a form of literature after all. When I was a kid I used to sit and read them. Anyways, Wikipedia is an easy source for correct names, dates, maybe a quick text source. And In my case, it is useful for me to find the english name of some books, when I do not feel lazy and wnat to written them.

    Anyways, any literature teaching who does not mention Cervantes every now and them is just unworth of being called teaching. Perhaps people in Canada know Cervantes.

  15. #30
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
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    ...any literature teaching (which) does not mention Cervantes every now and them is just unworth(y) of being called teaching.

    I must agree. There are certain figures you cannot avoid: Shakespeare, Dante, Milton, Chaucer, Montaigne, Racine, Moliere, Hugo, Baudelaire, Goethe, Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, the Bible, Tolstoy, Joyce, Cervantes... and a good many more. Skipping over any of these writers is a travesty.
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