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Thread: unbiased grading

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbebooks View Post
    I taught English for twenty years. A rubric has its pros and cons. Some kids liked them because it told them exactly what "I" was looking for.
    I've had experience with students (usually softball players) knowing how to play the school game and how to get by with the C. I don't believe a rubics is enough structure for a 15 year old.

    The best advice I've been given is: "You are the adult. You are standing in front of teenagers. Be the adult." So if I don't see a 15 year old doing enough-- I nag. I put some effort into my role as an adult, so the student knows I'm there.

    But it's become common for students not to have parents, food, clothing, or a place to live. These are the tough ones to grade.

  2. #17
    All are at the crossroads qimissung's Avatar
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    It is interesting to read people's opinions on rubrics. At my school we have, at times, been pushed to use them, as though we would not be teaching as well if we didn't. I like the idea that it gives students at least an idea of what I'm looking for, but unless they have done a fair amount of reading, and unless there is a lot of writing going on in the class using a rubric is somewhat useless in my opinion.

    What I hope to do, and struggle to do is find something for my students to write about that has meaning for them. Unless that happens writing is kind of a slog, and they of course, resort to just slapping something down on the paper just to say they completed their assignment.
    "The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its' own reason for existing." ~ Albert Einstein
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  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by qimissung View Post
    What I hope to do, and struggle to do is find something for my students to write about that has meaning for them. Unless that happens writing is kind of a slog, and they of course, resort to just slapping something down on the paper just to say they completed their assignment.
    Maybe my comment should be disregarded considering I am a student (albeit a passionate one) but I am not sure that I have even enjoyed writing a paper about something that has meaning for me. I like finding meaning in something that does not yet have meaning for me. I am a Lit student and, almost unhealthily, enjoy beginning at a paper with only a vague idea on something that I read once and coming out on the other end with an entirely new perspective on the work.

    Most kids will always just slap something down on the paper. But those who will not, I think, will be more inspired to do hard critical thinking with the latter writing process, I think. I know I was.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by motherhubbard View Post
    I'm having a hard time, even with a rubric. I'm finding that even my most advanced kids are not getting advanced scores in writing. I wonder if I'm being too hard, then I wonder if I'm being to easy. Sometimes when I know a child has really improved and done their best I have to make myself consider how I would feel if it were another child's paper.

    I think grading is the most challenging part of teaching. Well, maybe not the MOST challenging part, but's it's much harder than I thought it would be.

    What do you do to overcome bias and insure even handedness?
    I agree that still there are certain teachers who are biased when it come to grading of their "Favorite Pupil" rather than some other kid. I have made myself clear that although some of the students are in my favorite list but i still give them marks according to what they have written in their paper.The best thing about this behavior is that the child will ultimately work on his writing skills rather than buttering the teacher for good grades!!
    http://www.flashpapers.com/

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