Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Alyosha, the 'hero' of the novel

  1. #1
    Registered User coboyle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Northern Ireland
    Posts
    7

    Alyosha, the 'hero' of the novel

    Dostoevsky says in his preface that Alyosha is his novel's 'hero'; he's obviously meant to be (at first sight) the 'nice guy' out of the three brothers.

    But do you think it's the case that he was created for this purpose, as a 'traditional' hero, the good guy whom we should like and be behind? Personally, I think - given Alyosha's religious convictions, and the fact that Dostoevsky was not a religious man but would have liked to be able to have faith - that he's the sort of guy FD wishes he could be.

    Perhaps also FD based Alyosha on the person he wanted his son* to grow up to be. Certainly there must be some significance in the fact that he named him after him.

    But those are just some thoughts of mine

    * I'm sure most people know this, but Dostoevsky's son, Alexei died at a young age just as FD was starting to write BK.

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    27

    Alyosha

    I also think that Alyosha is Dostoyevsky's dead son. I feel his love for his son and for Alyosha on every page and yes, it's as though he's resurrected him and had him grow up. I'm only half way through the book but I feel this very strongly. He plays with this idea. Alyosha is an "angel" he delivers messages.
    He helps and loves. And he loves as only a 3 year old loves. Christ said to be like a child and Alyosha has no concern for practical matters, he loves and is loved by all.

    When he meets up with the children we're told that Alyosha has a special attraction to children, especially 3 year olds. Dostoyevsky lost Alexie at 3, just when he was writing this book. He loved this son beyond anyone else and felt that he'd inherited his gifts. Dostoyevsky did not live much longer himself, having died soon after completing the book.

    The scene where a woman goes to Zossima after having lost the son adored was taken straight from Dostoyevsky's life. He was inconsolable after the loss of his son and his wife took him to see an elder. The elder told him to return home and grieve and live his life, just as Zossima advised that woman.

    Alyosha is the hero. A hero is a model of the ideal.

  3. #3
    Ataraxia bazarov's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    In spleen
    Posts
    2,219
    There were 4 brothers, not 3.
    At thunder and tempest, At the world's coldheartedness,
    During times of heavy loss And when you're sad
    The greatest art on earth Is to seem uncomplicatedly gay.

    To get things clear, they have to firstly be very unclear. But if you get them too quickly, you probably got them wrong.
    If you need me urgent, send me a PM

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    231
    I feel Alyosha is the greatest of all dostoevskys 'heores'. The russian monk is an incredible character,and i think alyosha as his student has exceeded him by going outside the monastery. Dostoevsky shows a real hero doesnt have to intellectualise or be physically dominant but achieves results through active love. The epilogue with the boys (though phenomenally sad.) and the way he deals with his brothers and friends at the end is awe inspiring. 'Hurrah for Karazamov'. The one ending of dostovskys that i really enjoyed.

  5. #5
    The caffeinated newbie SFG75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    139
    Blog Entries
    1
    Of all the brothers, Alyosha is the one who is most likely not to gain your attention as the leader, the prevailer. Towards the end of the novel, we see that his quiet strength and stoic disposition wins the day. Likewise, you have Christ's inconspicuous birth and youth to contrast with his actions for mankind towards the end of his life.

  6. #6
    Watcher by Night mtpspur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Fairborn OH, USA
    Posts
    815
    Blog Entries
    394
    I made the mistake of reading this book with the idea that it would basically be an adventure story with florid language. Once I realized we were NOT in Stevenson or Scott territory or even Tolstoy I settled in for the long haul. I actually thought there would be an escape for Dmitri and the real murderer exposed at last. The ending was rarely unsettling. Frankly Alyosha does NOT impress as a hero. He delivers messages, makes no judgments unless asked and the part I can't get around is leaving town which Ivan's condition unresolved. No one grieves for the father though this highly understandable and it barely seems to bother Alyosha. Nothing really seems to phase him other then Elder Zossima's passing and he seems to get over that pretty good as well.

  7. #7
    Registered User kev67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Reading, England
    Posts
    2,281
    I read on Wikipedia that Dostoevsky planned to write a sequel about Alyosha, but sadly died before he could. I thought there were some loose ends in the book. In particular, I wondered whether Alyosha ever married that girl, Lise. It seemed like she was suffering from some ghastly wasting disease.

    Wikipedia also says Alyosha was played by William Shatner, aka Captain Kirk, in a 1958 American film adaption.
    According to Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence once said that Balzac was 'a gigantic dwarf', and in a sense the same is true of Dickens.
    Charles Dickens, by George Orwell

  8. #8
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Beyond nowhere
    Posts
    6,192
    Unfortunatelly Dostoewsky couldn´t finishThe Brothers Karamazow. It is even difficult to guess if the novel was nearly finished or if he intended to add many more parts. I should like to have known how the brothers developed.
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

  9. #9
    Registered User kev67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Reading, England
    Posts
    2,281
    It seemed to me that the book had reached the end. The trial was over and then there was the three chapter epilogue. Most of the action in the four parts happened over two or three day periods. If Mitya was going to escape, or Ivan get better, or Alyosha finish his education, perhaps marry Lise, and continue his adventures then that would all take place in another book. BK is long enough as it is.
    According to Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence once said that Balzac was 'a gigantic dwarf', and in a sense the same is true of Dickens.
    Charles Dickens, by George Orwell

  10. #10
    On the road, but not! Danik 2016's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Beyond nowhere
    Posts
    6,192
    I must check if my edition of the book has got the epilogue. According to my remembrance the novel ended with the trial so it was a sort of open ending. I love the novel but I feel that important issues were left unresolved.
    "You can always find something better than death."
    Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, The Bremen Town Musicians

Similar Threads

  1. The Quest For The Greatest Hero Ever: Beginnings-476 AD
    By Lord Macbeth in forum General Literature
    Replies: 87
    Last Post: 11-04-2010, 05:31 PM
  2. April '05 Book: Brave New World
    By Scheherazade in forum Forum Book Club
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 04-03-2009, 11:05 PM
  3. Atticus Finch: A Hero
    By willumcrowther in forum General Writing
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-08-2007, 02:06 PM
  4. The Real Hero
    By Stiffeny Brown in forum Shakespeare, William
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-15-2007, 01:47 AM
  5. Gilgamesh a Hero?
    By Gozeta in forum General Chat
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-22-2004, 04:00 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •