Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Thomas Hardy Poetry

  1. #1
    Registered User BookWorm_x's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Bath, England
    Posts
    11

    Thomas Hardy Poetry

    For AS Level, we had to study Thomas Hardy's poetry in a lot of depth, and I must admit, though we found the poet himself interesting, the poetry lacked something. I found quite a few of them very pessimistic. Most of them full of doubt, cynicism. They got even worse after 1912, when his wife, Emma died. I mean it's understandable to be pretty distraught when suffering a loss like that, but he wrote so many poems depicting his own guilt (they weren't speaking much to each other, and he didn't believe she was that ill), which, to some extent is quite sweet, but to some, it seems a little over the top, and very depressing.
    I will say something for Hardy, he did write a terrific love poem not long after meeting Emma called 'When I Set Out For Lyonnesse' which is a lovely, happy, and optimistic, magical poem.
    Knowledge is Power

  2. #2
    Registered User Jassy Melson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,772
    Blog Entries
    1
    Hardy was a minor poet (minor in the sense of his output). He was first and foremost a novelist and short story writer. He did write some memorable poems, especially Channel Firing, Ah, Are You Walking On My Grave, and The Darkling Thrush.
    Dostoevsky gives me more than any scientist.

    Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world. - Albert Einstein

  3. #3
    Bibliophile JBI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    6,357
    Quote Originally Posted by Jassy Melson View Post
    Hardy was a minor poet (minor in the sense of his output). He was first and foremost a novelist and short story writer. He did write some memorable poems, especially Channel Firing, Ah, Are You Walking On My Grave, and The Darkling Thrush.
    I do not know if I agree with that. I think he is equally as well known as a poet amongst readers of poetry. The difference is that the readers of English 19th century literature are more numerous than those of poetry, thus the renown. IT has nothing to do with output, or quality. He probably was the best English (as in England) poetry of his generation, especially in terms of output - he marks a nice pivot from 19th century poetics into the more experimental works of 20th century poetry, something of a major figure in my eyes.

    Honestly, the notion that a poet can be "minor" because he wrote successful novels is absurd.

    Then again, just looking at something like the Norton Anthology of Poetry, one can see that they do not seem to esteem him as a minor poet, in contrast to somebody like Kippling. In truth, I do not even know where your argument is exactly coming from. It would make sense if his poems were not so well known and available, but they really are quite commonly known outside of the high school curriculum that would seem to dictate the bulk of poetic knowledge (I cannot say for how well he is known in British high schools though and I am generalizing over North America).

Similar Threads

  1. fragments of contemporary poetry
    By quasimodo1 in forum Poems, Poets, and Poetry
    Replies: 691
    Last Post: 11-09-2013, 02:28 AM
  2. Thomas Hardy
    By piglet in forum Far From the Madding Crowd
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-29-2009, 06:28 PM
  3. A brief history of punjabi poetry.
    By durlabh in forum Poems, Poets, and Poetry
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-11-2009, 04:47 AM
  4. The "State" of American Poetry Today
    By jon1jt in forum Poems, Poets, and Poetry
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-16-2006, 05:41 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •