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Thread: Anyone read the whole of an author?

  1. #46
    Registered User the facade's Avatar
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    Very close to reading all of Orwell!

  2. #47
    Registered User Mallorie's Avatar
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    Ive read everything several authors have to offer but its usually pulpy garbage.

    I am almost ashamed to admit how much junk I have read.

    All of Edgar Rice Burroughs
    All of Orson Scott Card including his Mormon / Christian works
    All of Stephen King (for shame!)
    All of Dean Koontz (again for shame, but I love pulp)
    All of Chuck Palahniuk
    All of Terry Goodkind
    All of Ayn Rand's non fiction (not much, I know)
    Almost all of Vladimir Nabokov
    All of Franz Kafka, What we have that is, and I know thats not much


    I think that is it. I am somewhat indiscriminate about what I read, I love the classics and I always hope to discover some bright and glittering novel, but when I cant I am not above reading churned out pulp, if the writing style suits me.
    Last edited by Mallorie; 09-16-2010 at 09:56 PM.

  3. #48
    I've read the whole of Tolkien's bibliography, including a number of his edits for the Silmarillion and Lord of the Rings. Most of this came about for my undergraduate thesis, but he writes with such a meticulous wholeness, it was often like reading a history rather than a story.

    I've also read the whole of Neil Gaiman's solo works (he's so varied and does so many collaborations, it's hard to keep track) and am working through Cormac McCarthy's novels.

  4. #49
    λάθε arrytus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mallorie View Post
    Almost all of Vladimir Nabokov

    All of Nabokov? It is probably rude of me to do so but I find this claim dubious. Most people don't realize he wrote a ton of novels in Russian before he moved to France and Cornell, and they are pretty hard to find [e.g. 'Glory'; 'King, Queen, Knave']. He also has a bunch of his lectures on literature at Cornell and it's quite an expensive but brilliant collection. And his poetry is nearly impossible to find.

    As for myself I consider myself a well rounded reader and try to read everyone at least twice and yet have I to finish an oeuvre, whether it be Plato [some of the early dialogues] or even Shakespeare [a few of the histories, and more notably I've never read 'A midsommer night's dream']. However I'm pretty close with authors like Hesse [thought I was done but then found a bunch of strange books by him], Faulkner, McCarthy, Joseph Conrad, Goethe, Camus, Chekov, Aristophanes, Kant et al.

    -The only things I know of which I've yet to read by Dostoevsky and Kafka are their journals [I do own a first edition translation of the former].
    -I've read I believe everything by O. Henry [the two volume complete works].
    -Everything by Katherine Mansfield [not that hard of course]
    -Sylvia Plath
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  5. #50
    Registered User B. Laumness's Avatar
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    When I like an author, I usually read everything he/she wrote. Firstly I buy one book, and if I love it, I acquire the complete works in a good edition, even the letters and journals if available. Useless to cite the ones I read thus. You cannot fully appreciate a writer with a fragmentary insight. A good library is not composed only of paperbacks or selected pieces.

  6. #51
    Registered User Hyacinthine's Avatar
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    I have not read all of anyone's works, or at least not all of the works of anyone "great". (I somehow don't think J.K. Rowling counts). I feel rather guilty spending too much time on one author because, no, honestly I do not have an interest in being an expert on specific authors. I want to be as educated as possible about literature as a whole, and that involves reading widely. I want to read the most representative works of as many authors as possible.

    There are a few authors I think I'll eventually make exceptions for. Joyce. David Foster Wallace. Maybe some others I can't think of right now.

  7. #52
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    Reading all of their works.

    Your question really made me think about if I had read all of the works by a given author. I could think of a few none of which could be considered classical in any sense, but it is really intersting to see how a writer's work can either evolve with the writer or reflect what is going on in a writers life. The writer that I found this transition to be most apparent in is Laurell K. Hamilton. From her earliest books to where she is now are vastly different places. If your not familier with her she writes vampire books for grown-ups.

  8. #53
    Artist and Bibliophile stlukesguild's Avatar
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    I've read all of Kafka's writings that are available in translation, including his Blue Octavo Notebooks and his diaries. Only the letters remain unread. I've also read everything by J.L. Borges available in English, the same with Rimbaud's and Baudelaire's poetry. Others that I might be close on would include William Blake, Eugenio Montale, Hermann Hesse, and Poe. I've also read all in existence by Sappho, Homer, Virgil, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and several other early Greeks and Romans.
    Beware of the man with just one book. -Ovid
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  9. #54
    I've read all of Dostoevsky that is fictional, all of Kafka (including letters, had to read them for a paper I was writing last semester), most of Shakespeare, especially since I transferred schools and took two Shakespeare classes, the second part of a chronological British Literature series which included some of his sonnets, and a course on Elizabethan theatre. I believe I've read everything by William Faulkner but I've yet to confirm that. Unsure of James Joyce, as well. Haven't read much poetry by him, but I tackled all his books.

  10. #55
    Registered User ScribbleScribe's Avatar
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    I've read all of Edgar Allan Poe's works and am currently working on reading all of Dean Koontz's works.

  11. #56
    Registered User WyattGwyon's Avatar
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    I don't think reading all of the novels of a particular author is all that unusual. I've read all of Cormac McCarthy, William Gaddis, Dostoyevsky, Hugo, and probably a few more who aren't coming to mind immediately.

  12. #57
    λάθε arrytus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WyattGwyon View Post
    I don't think reading all of the novels of a particular author is all that unusual. I've read all of Cormac McCarthy, William Gaddis, Dostoyevsky, Hugo, and probably a few more who aren't coming to mind immediately.
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  13. #58
    BadWoolf JuniperWoolf's Avatar
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    I've read all of Ovid (except for the stuff that we don't have, obviously), and I think that I've read all of Rimbaud (letters included). Is there anything of his that isn't available in English?
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  14. #59
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    Sappho and Homer for me. I guess I could say Anne Carson too, I think I've read all of her published works except Odi et Amo Ergo Sum which was her PhD dissertation and Wonderwater which was a collaborative project. I think I'm getting there with Keats and Tolstoy too.

  15. #60
    Our wee Olympic swimmer Janine's Avatar
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    I think it's good to concentrate on one author for a time, because you really get to know that person and how they thought and lived; which I found to be very interesting and rewarding. I read the majority of D.H.Lawrence's work and also the majority of Thomas Hardy's....at least the novels: all the major ones and minor ones, as well. I have read all the short stories of Lawrence and many of the poems. I have the Posthumous works - "Phonenix" and hope to accomplish those stories and writings, as well. I also need to read all his commentary work and get back to Hardy and his poetry and short stories eventually. Mainly my focus has been on Lawrence and I hope to read nearly all of what he wrote and several new biographies of the author, as well. At least, that is my lifetime goal.
    Last edited by Janine; 01-11-2011 at 01:59 AM.
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